Mac vs PC for web development?

Discussion in 'Web Design and Development' started by sean00, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. sean00 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    #1
    OK so im a noob.... I have learnt HTML and looking to set a bit further into this. I know it will prob be a bit one sided on here but mac vs pc for web development? is there any restrictions doing it on a mac? What is the Industry moving towards ie what should I be learning to be at the forefront?
     
  2. André M macrumors member

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    Jul 17, 2009
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    #2
    I don't see any difference at all except what "special" programs you want to run for writing the code. since its just "text" you can just write it all in textedit if you wish.

    I, find that the programs for deving in mac, works better for me than it used to in windows but that might just be me preferrng mac but apps like CssEdit and Coda, i've never seen on windoze yet (except for dreamweaver which i used before).
     
  3. adamfishercox macrumors 6502

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    Aug 15, 2007
    #3
    The industry is decidedly moving *away* from IE. All in all web development is really just text so whatever computer you want will work. Windows has the slight advnatage of you being able to test IE, but then you can just install Windows on the Mac. Web development is really platform independent.
     
  4. TodVader macrumors 6502a

    TodVader

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    Sep 27, 2005
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    #4
    My workflow is much faster when using a Mac and expose than when using Windows.
     
  5. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #5
    there is really no difference when coding on different OS's.. the main difference will be for what browser you focus on, IE still has a very big footprint in the market and it requires different coding sometimes because it has been developed differently.

    when testing make sure that all aspects work on all different browsers and you will be fine, the computer you code on doesnt really make any difference - you can decide that for yourself :)
     
  6. sean00 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    May 3, 2009
    #6
    great thanks for all the replies. so just to set my mind at ease if i was to code in .net i could do that on a mac os?
     
  7. Ride9650 macrumors 6502

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    Jun 29, 2007
    #7
    You'd likely have to use bootcamp or one of the virtualization options for windows.
     
  8. TodVader macrumors 6502a

    TodVader

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    Sep 27, 2005
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    #8
    If you want to test locally on the environment it was made for, use Windows. Pro versions or better come with IIS.
     
  9. sean00 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    May 3, 2009
  10. Greenhoe macrumors regular

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    Dec 17, 2008
    #10
    I switched over to Mac because of web development. For some reason on my Vista machine my CS3 would always crash and would conflict with Microsoft Word 2007. I don't believe there is a problem with CS4 they conflict anymore but I hated Macs and the stereo type mac user before I switched and now I only use Macs and don't know how I could of ever lived with out it.

    As for Web Development Macs have a lot more software other then Adobe to use which windows doesn't. My favorite is CODA if your looking to start learning HTML / CSS coda is a great program that I couldn't do with out.

    You can do web development the same for both Mac and PC but using a Mac just gives you a much better experience this is coming from a guy who use to hate Macs
     
  11. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #12
    there's hardly any advantage to either platform.

    ...thus defeating the purpose of buying one.

    As usual, nothing to do with the question posed. Thanks for the daily dose of fanboy.
     
  12. adamfishercox macrumors 6502

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    Aug 15, 2007
    #13
    That would be the implication, yes.:confused:
     
  13. lamadude macrumors 6502

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    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Brussels, BE
    #14
    Urghh freakin' fanboys, they are this close to driving me away from macrumors.

    Back to the topic: I think both are equal, but of course the price can be lower on a PC since any low buget PC is powerful enough for web development. I guess it depends on in which environment you have the best workflow.
     
  14. memco macrumors 6502

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    May 1, 2008
    #15
    I do classic ASP development on my mac and it isn't really an issue. Fortunately, there's Mono, which is an open source environment for .NET that's cross-platform (runs on mac). With it you can serve .NET from your mac.
     
  15. savar macrumors 68000

    savar

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    District of Columbia
    #16
    That's a weird claim. Citations?

    IE is still the only browser that is included with every single copy of the most popular OS in the world. Until somebody breaks that stranglehold, I cannot agree that the "industry" is moving away from IE.

    Obviously, they all *want* to... but that's beside the point.
     
  16. adamfishercox macrumors 6502

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    Aug 15, 2007
  17. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

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    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #18
  18. adamfishercox macrumors 6502

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    Aug 15, 2007
    #19
    They haven't *moved* away, but they're *moving*
     
  19. sbauer macrumors member

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    Feb 7, 2009
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #20
    Which is useless if your client wants their product coded for the Microsoft version.
     
  20. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #21
    I think you missed the cross platform part. The code runs on either OS. I've used it myself following Microsoft tutorials and running them without modification on my Mac. So you can take what you create on your Mac and take it to Windows without needing to modify the code.
     
  21. sbauer macrumors member

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    Feb 7, 2009
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #22
    No, I got it. It just depends on the application. The most basic stuff will run without changes, but there are quite a few things that need porting (various asp.net hosting assemblies, some security code, webparts are not supported at all and updatable precompiled sites are not support at all). It's not as simple as "Oh, here's my application. Let me just run it using mono".
     
  22. a cat *miaow* macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    #23
    The best for developing would be whichever you're most comfortable with. There's not much difference so for me this would be a mac because I prefer working on it.

    For testing though... which is a huge part of web development, Windows is number 1 i'm afraid. Yes there's many similarities but if you just take the fact: The majority of visitors to your site will be using windows so therefor test on windows (unless your developing a site which only has mac downloads or something then that's not true :) )

    It is becoming less and less of a problem as software companies start to stick to standards but you should at least check any site out in windows before releasing it onto the web.
     
  23. sean00 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    #24
    thanks for all the answers guys... What i get from it is, The best option is to use a Mac with Windows installed as well there for you have the best of both worlds? :cool: Please tell me if i'm wrong.

    Is there any down sides in running Windows on Mac?
     
  24. wheezy macrumors 65816

    wheezy

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Location:
    Alpine, UT
    #25
    I think the tools provided on a Mac, for what I've discovered to use, are much much more powerful than on a Windows box for speed. CSS Edit alone is the major reason anyone should take a serious look at a Mac.

    Also, once you learn the few declarations IE just can't handle, there isn't much need for cross-browser checking. I've been pleasantly surprised several times when I've built up some intense CSS only to discover it looks A OK in IE - cause I stick to valid code, I don't create hacks to get my spacing right, and I avoid the few declarations IE can't handle. Rarely do I have to spend any time fixing for IE anymore. It just takes a little discipline.

    For me, Coda + CSS Edit is a fantastic, Mac only combo that I haven't seen a match for in the Windows World. There are several other text editors I could get cozy with ( to replace Coda ), but I'd lose so much speed in the process (thanks Clips!) and CSS Edit allows me to quickly create always valid stylesheets. Coda also validates on the fly so you can know right away when you've veered off course.
     

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