Macbook A1534 Thermal Paste replaced, runs a bit hotter?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by Bioshock.Rocks, Jan 18, 2016.

  1. Bioshock.Rocks macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2016
    #1
    Hey guys,

    I purchased this laptop about 2 weeks ago and I am pretty much in love with it. I have a 2011 Macbook Pro but I'm thinking about selling it because I don't feel the need to have another Macbook.

    This whole 'fan-less' system on laptops kind of freaks me out. I'm used to my laptops running hot due to the gaming I sometimes do on my Macbook Pro. I felt this Macbook get a bit warm and though - What if I changed the thermal compound on this unit to some Antec FORMULA 7 Nano Diamond Thermal Compound that I have laying around that was for my Macbook Pro?

    I went ahead and changed the paste without any issues. I was watching some youtube videos and I felt the laptop get a bit warm. I surfed tumblr and I REALLY felt the Macbook get warm near the CPU area.

    My question is would the heat be that the compound that was applied transferring heat faster from the CPU to the heatsink or did I not apply it right thus the amount of heat coming from the bottom of the unit? As I'm typing the laptop isn't hot - it's just cold/warm.


    Thank you for your help and I hope you have a great day!
     
  2. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

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    #2
    I really wouldn't have messed with it, but since you already have, do you have any before/after temperature data? Why you "feel" on the bottom case isn't accurate at all.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #3
    I'd look to get what temps you're actually running. And as T5BRICK stated, I personally wouldn't have messed with it.

    Odd are, that if the CPU is running hotter then before, you misapplied the compound or even maybe using the wrong one compound.
     
  4. Queen6, Jan 19, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2016

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #4
    Without before and after CPU temperature with exact same load and conditions, there is no real way to tell. Personally I doubt it makes any significant difference. Elevating the rear of the notebook will likely be more beinificial allowing the base to radiate heat more efficiently.

    Q-6
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #5
    I've done it before, and in only one case did I notice it having some positive results. Even so, that positive result was I think if memory serves me (its been several years) only 5c.
     
  6. Algus macrumors regular

    Algus

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    #6
    Laptops that don't have fans can't really get hot enough to need them. They're also relatively low power. The Core M in the rMB and the Rockchip ARM CPUs used in some chrome books are examples. You don't need much CPU power at all to power even 1080p video playback these days.

    You will want the thermal paste on that thing but I don't think using a more expensive gaming paste is going to make much of a difference. If it wasn't applied right, you might actually hurt it! Monitor your temps as you use the system and repaste if things are out of whack.

    It's not uncommon for the cases on Macs to get fairly warm. The aluminum spreads the heat out and the entire device gets hot but not dangerously so. I've seen before where someone said Apple markets their computers as notebooks and not laptops because of this :p Dunno if that is true but the aluminum heating up is definitely true, normal, and not particularly hazardous to your device. but maybe to your bare legs if you're using the computer on your lap
     
  7. Queen6, Jan 19, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2016

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #7
    Unless changing the TIM is done in a highly methodical manner, odds are you will never really know. Apple`s portables tend to run hotter than their PC counterparts as that`s how Apple designs them, rather than the TIM or application. Personally unless the system is throttling or shutting down due to thermal overload, there is no need for user intervention, other than periodic cleaning of the (active) cooling system.

    Q-6
     
  8. MrAverigeUser, Jan 19, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2016

    MrAverigeUser macrumors 6502a

    MrAverigeUser

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    #8
    You didn´t even communicate the CPU-temperature after the re-pasting….

    Me, I think the limiting factor (= bottle neck for heat transfer) is primarily the tiny (insufficient?) little metal piece for "cooling" and less the transfer of heat between CPU and cooler. And one more reason perhaps the too thin aluminum case around which does not let diffuse the heat in it more than just locally and so limits the surface area for exchange with the ambient air - plus too less space between MB12" and the surface under it …. and less the not-so-good-applicated thermal paste… (put onto separate mounted cpu and gnu with one flash.. the chinese way...arrrggg…)

    as you can see here:

    https://de.ifixit.com/Teardown/Retina+Macbook+2015+Teardown/39841
     
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #9
    Even then, you may be better off taking it to Apple having them deal with it. Macs are more and more sealed and opening them up poses higher risk of damaging something, At least for me, the risks are not worth the reward.
     
  10. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #10
    For me the rMB`s cooling is fine, you just need to be mindful that the system is passive and what it`s sitting on. The cooling system also seems to be fairly effective given the TDP and the size of the baseplate.

    My own 1.2 rMB will run at 2Ghz all day long if sat on a small powered cooler, which rather indicates the TIM, heat sync and baseplate can efficiently remove heat from the CPU at 100% load. Where the rMB will struggle is flat on the desk, in high ambient temperatures, as will any passive cooled system of the same spec.

    Q-6
     
  11. MrAverigeUser macrumors 6502a

    MrAverigeUser

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    #11

    ok - but most people use it on a flat surface like a table , don´t they?

    and add a cooler underneath the MB12" is a good solution for you - but not at all elegant in terms of mobility for everyone, is it? ;)
     
  12. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #12
    I tend to elevate the rear of my notebooks for ergonomics, I am also mindful what the rMB is sat on, as the base is effectively the notebooks cooler. FWIW I have little if any issue with my 1.2 throttling, equally it`s usage spectrum matches it`s capabilities.

    Not a solution, more a factor of curiosity, for CPU intensive tasks, I have far more powerful hardware, equally in pinch it`s handy to know how to get the most out of such a diminutive system.

    Q-6
     
  13. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    #13
    I think it is more important on a fanless system to consider how (and where) you use it, remembering that the case is quite efficient for cooling, but there's physical limits. Running tasks at a high CPU/GPU level likely means the throttling unless you have auxiliary cooling available, such as a cool pad.
    If you want to stay "elegantly mobile", then be aware that throttling happens under some conditions - as it should.

    To the OP - re-doing the thermal compound, if it makes the cooling more efficient, would make the link to the heatsink better - more heat transfer, so the exterior, in turn, would also be warmer. So, you did a good job, and it now feels warmer to you - as it should.
    Better, as others here have suggested, is to compare the measured temps of the chipset, both before and after the re-grease. If you get better cooling, then the chipset should run cooler - and as a consequence, the outside case will be warmer. Does that make sense?
     
  14. MrAverigeUser macrumors 6502a

    MrAverigeUser

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    #14
    AGREE! this is an absolutely logical and convincing argument - as long as you show that it is now less or not more throttling than before under equal load-conditions.
     
  15. oneMadRssn macrumors 68040

    oneMadRssn

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    #15
    I've changed the thermal paste on a few Apple computers recently. At most I see a 5C drop, which is not something you would feel at all on the exterior. Most of the time the drop is just 1-3C, or within the margin of error as I see it. That said, thermal paste in the Macs gets dry and crumbly after 3 or 4 years. Recently the 2011 Macbook Air we had since launch started heating up more, and I suspect the paste just stopped being as effective. Changing it did the trick, as the temperatures seem to be back to normal now.
     
  16. Bioshock.Rocks thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 18, 2016
    #16
    Thank you for responding guys (and gals) I didn't know I was going to get these many responses. The bad thing about this that would of been helpful was that I did NOT get a temp reading before, I got too excited to even think about it.

    The reason why I changed the thermal paste was because on my Macbook Pro was running extra hot, changing the thermal paste helped stupendously - I thought by replacing the thermal paste on this Macbook without a fan would aid it big time.

    Also, I thought the less thermal paste you apply the better? I opened up the heatsink on this Macbook and I see exactly what is picture on the Teardown for this Macbook over at iFixit

    [​IMG]
    I added some of the Antec Formula 7 paste just to the 'reflector' part of the processor and not all over the processor like how its pictured.

    With Core M does the thermal paste have to go all over the processor (the green part as shown in the picture?) or do you think how I did it is just fine?

    Thank you :)
     

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