Macbook Heating Up

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Tissue Paper, Apr 23, 2014.

  1. Tissue Paper macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    #1
    I went and bought the latest Macbook Pro with the highest specs just so that I finally play Nancy Drew games. Most of the old Nancy Drew games are not Mac compatible so I had to install windows parallel on my Macbook. I was ecstatic when I was finally able to install them game but less than 10 minutes through the game's introduction and the Macbook heated up to a scary point. I couldn't even touch it and the vent went crazy. I panicked and uninstalled the game. The told me the computer can handle anything and it's the top of the market but I'm really kind of disappointed.

    This is the model I got: http://www.amazon.com/Apple-MacBook...F8&qid=1398253911&sr=8-6&keywords=macbook+pro

    Is there a way to fix it once and for all or should I start saving for a PC? :(
     
  2. yjchua95 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
    #2
    It's normal. Whenever I play BF4 on my Mac (via Boot Camp), the temperatures run up with the fans too, but it's still at a touchable point.

    I think the biggest factor of your heating up was because you used Parallels. If I'm not mistaken, more CPU power is used because it has to emulate a GPU for the Windows environment.

    Try playing it in Boot Camp instead.
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    If you're not already doing so, use iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) to get accurate readings of your temps, fan speeds, etc., rather than relying on your sense of touch or sound. A forum member has posted a copy of iStat Pro that has been "tweaked" to enhance compatibility with Mountain Lion. You can download it here.
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)
    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.
    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis), or 1200 for the newest MBAs. Older iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range, while the newest iMacs have a single fan, spinning at a minimum of about 1400 rpm. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)
    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all notebooks in the MacBook line (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best. For Flash-related issues:
     
  4. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #4
    Here's a quick lesson in physics: Power generates heat.

    What you experienced was 100% normal and there is nothing to fix. You panicked for no good reason and were not damaging your computer. Go ahead and reinstall the game.

    You were running 2 operating systems on a single computer while gaming in one of them. There's just no way a notebook will stay cool under those circumstances, this has nothing to do with whether the computer is a Mac or PC.
     
  5. Tissue Paper thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    #5
    I see. Sorry I'm not very tech savvy, so what you're saying is that I can continue playing even if the fans go crazy and the computer heats up, it's perfectly okay?
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    Yes. As stated, your Mac will shut down before temps can reach a level that could cause damage.
     
  7. Tissue Paper thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    #7
    Ok. Will probably put me on edge but I'll try it tonight. Thanks!
     
  8. thundersteele macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Location:
    Switzerland
    #8
    Can you use a frame rate limiter or something to decrease the load on the system? I'm not familiar with Nancy Drew games, but to me they don't sound like games that would be very demanding on hardware...
     
  9. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #9
    Yes. A computer is a tool, and just like every other tool, it is meant to be used. And, like many other tools, it has safeguards built-in to prevent self-destruction.

    Go right ahead and make that puppy run, that's what it's meant to do.
     
  10. Tissue Paper thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    #10
    Thank you Snaky hehe.

    Thundersteel, the games are very light, that's why I was surprised. I'm actually playing the point and click old ones and the one I'm currently trying is only 357MB :|
     

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