Macbook heating up

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by Natsu, Apr 29, 2008.

  1. Natsu macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    #1
    What are possible causes for a macbook to heat up? I'm getting a macbook soon and also wanted to know if this heating up problem is a big issue.
     
  2. Jeweller macrumors member

    Jeweller

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Denver
    #2
    Well, what are you planning to do with it? There are plenty of threads concerning what a MB can and cannot handle. I'd recommend you poke around the forum, or if you have one or more specific concerns, be more specific.

    I've had my MB for about two months now and the only time it gets hot or the fans crank up is when I'm doing video conversion. Rest of the time it's running silent, with the fans hovering around 1800rpms.
     
  3. Natsu thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    #3
    thanks for the tip. Ill poke around the forum....
     
  4. cogsinister macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Location:
    Fredericton NB Canada
    #4
    Just looking at my MacBook the wrong way makes it heat up.......
     
  5. lfc200 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    #5
    if you have a lot of applications open that can make the macbook heat up. Also if your using flash that will make the macbook heat up. But generally its not too big of a problem
     
  6. cogsinister macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Location:
    Fredericton NB Canada
    #6
    Yeah, flash, like youtube and streaming video are the killers....
     
  7. Surely Guest

    Surely

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #7
    I took this photo with my iPhone.

    I was wirelessly printing a large document (~180 pages) over my Airport Express, and look at how hot my MacBook got. It's never gone that high before!
     

    Attached Files:

  8. marbles macrumors 68000

    marbles

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    EU mostly
    #8


    Is that too hot ?

    I'm led to believe that the CPU's will shut down if there is an adverse amount of heat.
     
  9. Surely Guest

    Surely

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #9
    I'm not sure what "too hot" is.

    Keep in mind that my temps are in Celsius. However, 93°C is still very hot.
     
  10. Bobioden macrumors 68000

    Bobioden

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Location:
    Denver
    #10

    Turning it on.
     
  11. Matek macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    #11
    The biggest problem is always with the cooling, not with the applications. If you take a new MacBook and put it on a desk or some other flat surface, you can put full load on both cores and it will not overheat in any way.

    Problems start if you use it some place where it can't cool down properly, if you block the fans, if you get a lot of dust in it etc.
     
  12. Surely Guest

    Surely

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #12
    I can agree with most of that.

    My MacBook was on my dining room table (no table cloth) when I took the photo in my post above.
     
  13. Matek macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    #13
    That's pretty bad. Have you tried vacuuming your computer in case there's any dust in it? Perhaps it's some kind of a defect, it shouldn't get this hot if the cooling conditions are good.
     
  14. marbles macrumors 68000

    marbles

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    EU mostly
    #14
    Macbooks ship with a plastic cover over the vents ,if I remember correctly ... maybe worth checking your vents to see if they have any such plastic on them causing the heat.

    just a thought :)
     
  15. H$R macrumors 6502

    H$R

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    Switzerland
    #15

    hm. Yeah sure it's high, but the CPU could handle more temp (not that someone should try it), and it should shut down if it's too hot.

    I also have a new wireless printer, let's see what happens when I have to print some 180 pages sometime. But normally my airport card (which runs all day) is 72° C (62° when I start the MB up). You only got 70° :D


    To the topic: mine get's hot on the upper left side (where the power stuff is) and sometimes where the screen is connected to. But that doesn't bother me much.
    I sometimes have it on my lap or on the bed, but then I am not doing more than searching the web or using MSN messenger. I've never really had heating problems then.
     
  16. Natsu thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    #16
    what are RPMs, i saw it in the istat, whats the normal 'rpm' rate and whats the max. I dont wanna overkill my new laptop with just 'rmp's
     
  17. Wireless Buddy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Location:
    Baltimore, Maryland
    #17
    RPMs are the amount of times your fans spin per minute. RPM = Revolutions Per Minute.
     
  18. Surely Guest

    Surely

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #18
    No dust. All clean. All good.

    Um.... nope.

    Like you said, I figured it could handle more heat and that it would shut down if there was any risk. I've just never had such high temps since I got it back in November, and nothing since that day I printed that doc. I thought I'd share.

    My airport card is at 53°C right now- it usually hovers at around 58°C. I think it got up to 70°C because of the print job.

    When my MacBook gets hot, it does it in the same place as yours, the upper left side.
     
  19. jmmtn4aj macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Location:
    Singapore
    #19
    You sure those temps are accurate? Overclockers amongst us will recognise the stable limit of a C2D Conroe or Kentsfield is around 70, in the 70s it starts to produce errors. If anything mobile processors are supposed to run much cooler, but I don't know if Intel designed it for higher thermal limits too (maybe taking crappy laptop coolers into account).

    Anyway, the processor won't burn up, it'll automatically downclock itself past the thermal threshold, a safety feature that's been around in every computer processor since 3 years ago or so.. Other components might be affected though. In my Sony Vaio the processor never had to downclock itself, but I ran folding@home on it for a few days and soon the fan stopped working. You could pretty much fry an egg on the underside, even typing became painful :p
     
  20. Surely Guest

    Surely

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #20
    I can only assume that those temps are accurate based on iStat Pro's reputation. I have no way of really knowing, unless I get really anal and decided to download another temp reader program and run them at the same time.

    I'm not really concerned, as I know that the CPU will downclock or shutdown if it gets dangerously hot. I was just surprised to see 93°C.:cool:
     
  21. marbles macrumors 68000

    marbles

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    EU mostly
    #21
    did you say that you just got the machine back ?

    if so then and a repair was carried out then get the people who did the job to have a look see

    ...explain the situation and all should be good .

    could just be a simple human error upon rebuild ?!.

    just a thought .
     
  22. Surely Guest

    Surely

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #22
    Are you talking to me?

    No, I never said that. You are mistaken.
     
  23. marbles macrumors 68000

    marbles

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    EU mostly
    #23


    sorry , my mistake , I apologize .I got mixed up it was in another thread I meant to post that
     
  24. H$R macrumors 6502

    H$R

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    Switzerland
    #24

    rpm= revolutions per minute as someone said above.

    minimum on your MacBook is around 1800 rpm. I consider that as normal, when you only do a bit writing or surfing, or listen to music. You shouldn't here any noise then, at least not with the last generations.
    The maximum I ever got was 2600 rpm with video converting I think. But that's not the maximum. It can go well over 5000 rpm if not more. At least I've heard that somewhere (anyone correct me if he/she knows the real maximum)
    You will here your fan spinning and running then making much noise.


    at surely: my airport card is 68° C hot after a few minutes after I boot up the MB or wake it from sleep. And when I am transfering files over the WLAN to my server or download something from the net, then it get's to 72° C maximum. But my CPU is mostly ad 50° C.
     
  25. SupremeTeam macrumors newbie

    SupremeTeam

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Location:
    West Coast
    #25
    you can always use SmcFancontrol. it works like a charm
     

Share This Page