macbook pro 13' 2012 high cpu temp and fan problem

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ssttaal, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. ssttaal macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    #1
    My macbook gets cpu temp at 98C and then the fan starts raising speed from the default rpm(2000rpm).
    with heavy cpu usage and cpu temp at 96-101C, tha fan waits about 2-5 minutes and then kicks in and increase the rpm( the higher rpm i saw was 4000rpm at 101C cpu temp). all the other time the fan speed is between 1995-2004rpm.
    For example when i am just browsing and downloading an app, the cpu temp is close to 70C and the fan speed is between 1995-2000rpm,sometimes if it stays too long on this temp, it spins close to 2100rpm(and never higher than that). If i try to convert a video the cpu temp raises to 98C-100C in about 2 minutes but the fan remains at 2000rpm and starts kick in(spin up to 2700-3000rpm) after another 1 or 2 minutes.
    Is this delay normal?
    Is this the way that fan control on macbooks pro 13' works? Or my MBP has a faulty fan control?


    I've already tried SMC and PRAM reset and clean OSX installation.
    Thank you
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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  3. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #3
    do all the MBP's operate the same way?
    I think that this delay of the fan controller to react in high cpu temps will burn the cpu eventually.

    thank you for your respond
     
  4. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

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    #4
    I'm not familiar with that model of computer, so I don't know if the temperatures that you're describing are normal or not. They seem high to me... but the behavior that you're describing is normal. The system doesn't increase the fan speeds based on processor activity, but instead on temperature. It takes a little while for the processor temperature to rise, thus it follows that the fans won't rev up until a bit after the processor has been active and increased its temperature.
     
  5. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #5
    They all act that way. No, it will not burn up the CPU. Don't forget Apple adheres to Intell's CPU specifications and has done much testing. And those temperatures are normal as well.
     
  6. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #6
    thank you for your answer.
    that is the problem, the fan won't speed up even if the cpu temp goes high!
    it waits for about 1-3 minutes and then increase the rpm.

    are you sure that all the MBPs act that way? So there is no need for me to worry about it?right? thank you again!!
     
  7. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #7
    Very sure. This is how it has been since 2006 and the first Intell based Apple laptops.
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #8
    Yes, Intell is right. It's quite normal. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)

    If you're not already using it, iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level.

    If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC.
    (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  9. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

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    Hawaii, USA
    #9
    I find it weird that he's getting that close to the maximum temperatures. Just for reference, my early 2008 Macbook Pro (2.4 Ghz "Penryn" Core2Duo) would get up to the mid-80˚C's when I strained the processor over a long period of time, but I never saw it go over 90˚C. At idle it would be somewhere between the 40's and 60's (depending on how warm or cold the room was). Now I'm using a late 2011 Macbook Pro (2.2 Ghz quad-core Core i7) and the temperature story is similar, except that its idle temperatures are about 5-10˚C cooler than the 2008 system. On both systems, the fans seem to start revving up around the high 60's to 70's.

    Both of my computers are 15" systems. It makes sense that the 13" systems would have different cooling characteristics, but my wife's Macbook (13" Core2Duo) seemed to be similar in terms of its temperature ranges.
     
  10. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #10
    thank you for your respond.
    All these measurements i wrote above is from istat menus.

    my concern is about the time that the fan waits before increase the rpm.
    as i wrote in the first post:
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #11
    You don't have to worry about it. Fans won't always spin up immediately when there is a spike in temps. They may not spin up at all. They may spin up when you don't think the temps are that high. Your Mac knows how to manage temps and fan speeds, without you being involved. Just relax and enjoy your Mac and forget about temps and fan speeds, unless your Mac is shutting down due to temps.
     
  12. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #12
    yes, i have the same opinion that this is the correct way for the fan control to act.
    but my MBP isn't working that way...
    I don't know if i should consider it as a hardware problem or not...
     
  13. calvol macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 3, 2011
    #13
    Although 95C is within spec, I wouldn't be comfortable running my MBP at those temps for extended periods if you're going to keep the machine beyond the warranty period. Heat reduces the life of any electronic component, particularly CPUs, but it may not be significant if you intend to sell the machine before a failure occurs (e.g. running a machine at 95C may reduce the cpu life 20%, but 20% of 10,000 hours is 8,000 hours of usuable life).

    If you're concerned, I would install one of the manual fan control programs, and crank the fans up manually when you're using apps that tax the cpu,. Also, I would consider applying ArticSilver cpu paste to the heat sink to ensure that it has adequate heat dissapation.
     
  14. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #14
    so i don't have to worry if this delay of the fanto speed up will eventually burn the cpu?

    ----------

    if i make sure that this is the "normal" way that the MBPs operate, i will surtenly do that. thank you
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #15
    It won't. Relax. As I said before, the CPU will automatically shut your computer down to avoid damage if temps get too high. Are you reading the replies, or are you just asking the same questions repeatedly without taking the time to read the responses?
     
  16. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #16
    ok..
    thank you for your help guys.

    if anyone btw have a MBP 13 ' 2012, he might tell me how his MBP works with the fan so i could compare it with mine.
     
  17. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #17
    ofcourse i read them, but its not enough for the cpu to turn off the MP in too high temps. the point is that temps like 90-100C will reduse the cpu's life.
    anyway, as i understand after all these responds, this issue cannot be clearly defined as problem or not. so i will just keep an eye on it and do nothing for now.
     
  18. Hugh macrumors 6502a

    Hugh

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    Erie, PA
    #18
    I have a MacBook Pro 13' 2012, what are you doing on your machine that is making your CPU heat to go up? I have yet to hear the fan on this unit, and I've watching Flash videos like crazy. My MacBook Late 2007 fans come on full blast when I watch Flash videos. :/

    Hugh
     
  19. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    Dec 11, 2008
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    #19
    If you are concerned with the temperatures and want to reduce them elevation of the rear of the machine helps, as sitting flat on the desk only reflects the head back to the base of the Mac. You can buy passive aluminium coolers like Rain Designs Mstand or iLap. Most powered coolers are designed for PC notebooks and dont work overly well with Mac`s one cooler that does work efficiently is the Moshi Zefyr 2, as it`s principle of cooling is specifically designed for Apple portables, by blowing the air horizontally across the base of the computer, however don't expect miracles.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Link: Moshi Zefyr 2
    A cheap USB fan cab achieve the same if strategically placed, not as elegant mind, but they do help to reduce case temperatures.

    You can use software to override Apple`s own cooling algorithm by manually taking control of fan RPM and setting up power profile presets with SMC Fan Control 2.4, or here with UltraFan which allows you stipulate a preset temperature and the software will automatically raise and lower fan RPM`s to keep the system at the predefined temp, which i personally feel is a far more elegant solution, at the end of the day you want to control your system temperature, not your fan rpm`s. For me SMC is now pretty much redundant with the latest release of UltraFan having manual control of the fans, and i am starting to uninstall it from my own Mac`s. SMC FC is a great app, however although it`s recently updated functionality is limited compared to some newer apps.

    Strictly speaking Apple`s own cooling algorithm works, albeit at sacrifice of increased temps for quieter operation, this has always been the Apple way and is really nothing detrimental to the systems, i have one MBP from 2008 all original barring a recent fan change that has an uptime of over 30K hours. The latest MBP`s need less assistance in remaining cool; for some it`s simply disconcerting the heat generated and transferred to the case, although it`s perfectly normal as the aluminium acts as a heat-sync. i have to deal with elevated ambient temperature so at times a software solution is useful. Apart from the passive cooling the Mstands bring they also offer a very sound ergonomic solution. A passive cooler and UltraFan will maximise the cooling, there is little else you can do short of reducing the ambient temperature or the system load. If I know i am going to push a system i will close all apps that are not essential as this can and does make an impact to system temperature.

    High temperature in general is not overly harmful to your systems, what is far more detrimental is thermal stress, when temperatures rapidly fluctuate by significant margins in a short period of time. Anyone striving for great longevity should look to minimise rapid fluctuation of temperature.

    The old adage still applies; it`s easier to keep a system cool, than cool-down an already hot machine. This being said it`s not strictly necessary, equally it`s nice to know that there are options for reducing temperature out there.
     
  20. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #20
    hello, as i wrote in the first post when i try to convert a video the cpu temp raises to 98C-100C in about 2 minutes but the fan remains at 2000rpm and starts kick in(spin up to 2700-3000rpm) after another 1 or 2 minutes.

    Can you please write here your MBPs fan speed? specifically when your cpu temp is between 70-80C! I use istat menus for the measurements and i use "handbrake" to convert a video. i will be very thankful if you help me with this.

    ----------

    @ Queen6

    thank you for your time!!
    I will really could use some of your advices! :)
     
  21. angelsguardian macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    Location:
    North East Scotland
    #21
    If this is normal then my 2012 MBP 13" is VERY abnormal. When doing repeat video conversions (think 26 episode series) with CPU load at or near 100% iStat Pro reports and average heatsink temp of 60 and the fans get to about 5000. In normal use temp is around 40 and fans 2000 with no sound. In fact fan sound is low at 5000 too. This is MUCH cooler and quieter than the late 2011 13 I had before.
     
  22. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #22
    download "istat menus" and you will be able to see the cpu core temp.
    by the time you start a conversion, after how many minutes does the fan speed up to 5000rpm?
     
  23. angelsguardian macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    Location:
    North East Scotland
    #23
    I'll get that in the morning. I did directly compare with the 2011 machine and there was around a 35 degree difference. The fans ramp up quite gradually probably around five minutes when at 100% load. Video conversion is about the only thing that I've noticed brings the temp or fans up at all.
     
  24. MaxPower72 macrumors 6502

    MaxPower72

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    Chicago, Illinois, Crooks County
    #24
    everything is fine with mine, haven't heard the fan yet in 2 months that I had it.
     
  25. ssttaal thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 11, 2012
    #25
    can you tell after how many minutes the fan kicks in from 2000rpm?

    ----------

    what do you mean fine?
    your MBP acts just like mine?
     

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