Macbook Pro 13, 8GB Ram?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ricksen24, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. ricksen24 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2011
    #1
    Hi Guys,

    Looking at replacing my current 2011 MBP which is running 16GB of Ram with an i5.

    Now was about to order a 13Inch with the 16GB ram upgrade before i checked the Refurb store on apple where i can save £200 on the standard 8gb model....

    Question is will i notice difference dropping to 8gb from 16gb?

    Any help appreciated as always guys!

    Oh and one more thing does the retina's run cooler than the 2011 models?

    Cheers:cool:
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #2
  3. ricksen24 thread starter macrumors member

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    #3
    General stuff bit of Photoshop, movies, browsing football manager etc.

    Thanks for the link my bad for not noticing the thread.
     
  4. cjmillsnun macrumors 68020

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  5. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #5
    No, I don't think you will notice any problems dropping to 8GB.

    If you are running Mavericks and Yosemite you can check your RAM pressure to confirm, I doubt whether you ever get into even Yellow.

    My MBP with 8GB only gets into Yellow when supporting 16GB of virtual, and I REALLY have to push things to get there...see screenshot. As the OS runs off an SSD there wasn't any UI or experience slowdown when swapping started to occur so if you occasionally really need 16GB, it will be fine.
     

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  6. ricksen24 thread starter macrumors member

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    #6
    Cheers for that.

    Pressures a solid green bar.

    Any downsides other than the packaging to using the refurb store?
     
  7. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #7
    None that I am aware of, you can purchase Apple Care, consumables are replaced (there is a list of what is carried out on which devices on Apple.com) and it is fully tested....
     
  8. Natzoo macrumors 65816

    Natzoo

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    #8
    I have 16gb of ram, and i use safari (10 tabs), powerpoint, and photo running at the same time and have around 4gb of ram left. But if you can find 16 gb of ram get it, its just nice to have
     
  9. johnnnw macrumors 65816

    johnnnw

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    Feb 7, 2013
    #9
    The RAM pressure is a terrible POS.

    I was regularly running out of RAM and paging out a ton with 4GB and the pressure was mid green, when I was clearly low on RAM.

    I have since upgraded to 8gb and it's better, but ram pressure is a bad way to judge if you need more ram.
     
  10. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    I'm sure you're just trying to be helpful by sharing your experience, but as has been discussed about 8 million times on this forum, that's not how RAM usage works. It's not like you only have 4GB "left". The usage you describe would have the same system performance on an SSD-equipped Mac with only 4GB of RAM total.

    Anyone want to suggest a good link that succinctly explains these concepts? (imo, the Apple link on memory management offers an inadequate level of detail even for noobs).

    I don't think I'd go that far - for the "average" user, it's a decent indicator. But I agree that some folks around here seem to miss the subtleties of what's actually going on to keep things in the green. There can be momentary slowdowns in performance as memory management pages out to swap and/or compresses memory, in order to relieve RAM pressure. Swap, along with memory compression is a more "accurate" indication.
     
  11. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #11
    Can you please post a screenshot of your RAM usage?
     
  12. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    I'm curious what you think there's is to be gained by looking at his present memory usage on an 8GB Mac?
     
  13. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #13
    Just out of interest and comparison. Below is a deliberate worst case on mine, pushed into the red and coming back down into yellow and green. Interestingly if you compare to the all-yellow graph, there is about twice as much swapping gone on compared to the graph peaking in red.

    Obviously Memory Pressure doesn't equate swapping with automatic Red pressure, nor can it tell the future, only the user can tell if they are likely to run a Red-inducing workload regularly and therefore make an upgrade decision.

    For an OS designed to fill memory, there has to be another way to advise on whether more RAM is needed, the pressure graph does the job pretty well for most users I think.
     

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  14. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    Honestly, at first, I was having a difficult time understanding what you were trying to say, so I wrote the following below as a way to explain how I see it. After finishing, I re-read what you had wrote, and I realized that a lot of what we're saying is the same thing, maybe just from slightly different perspectives...

    There's a difference between needing additional RAM, and benefiting from additional RAM, just like there's a difference between literally "starving" and just being "hungry". When RAM pressure increases due to applications requesting more RAM than is currently available, there is a dip in performance as memory is compressed and/or paged out to swap. How noticeable that is depends on the computer hardware and duration of memory pressure until the memory manager can free up RAM. In most situations, for average users, minor moments of memory pressure aren't going to be very noticeable, particularly on an SSD-equipped system.

    The Memory pressure gauge indicates duration and intensity of memory pressure at the current moment in time (and shows the last few minutes of recorded memory pressure). So as you suggest, swap by itself is not an indicator of memory pressure at any given moment... there are scenarios where a small amount of swap is needed here and there, that accumulates over an extended period of time, but never having much perceptible impact on performance... or there could be a very large spike in memory pressure that results in a large amount of swap being used all at once, and system performance stalling, before memory management compensates and reduces the memory pressure back to green.

    So there's really a case to be made both ways: The Memory pressure gauge may not indicate "past" lags in performance at any given moment, and swap and memory compression may not indicate the severity of lags in performance. Unless observing in real time, it's hard to know.

    I think we can all agree that too many unknowledgeable users either equate performance issues with lack of RAM (when it's often some other issue) or look at their memory usage and misinterpret what they're looking at. When there are spikes in memory pressure, it's really up to each user to determine whether lags in system performance are noticeable to them, and whether they're really worth addressing (sometimes with a little help of more knowledgeable users).
     
  15. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #15
    Yep to all of what you said :cool:
     

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