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Robertjan88

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 30, 2018
166
25
Yesterday, I bought a 13 inch MacBook Pro. When touching the MacBook, once it hits about 100%, I can feel static vibration (e.g. when swiping with my finger e.g. above the Touchbar).

The standard (default) EU USB-C charger has only 2 pins and does not seem to contain the additional iron grounding larger plugs have.

Is there a solution for this? Can static energy caused by lack of grounding damage the MacBook Pro in the long term when touching it (which would mean I can't charge and work at the same time)? I assume that the MacBook is working like a "cage of faraday", but rather double check. ;)
 
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jerryk

Contributor
Nov 3, 2011
7,059
3,937
SF Bay Area
Yesterday, I bought a 13 inch MacBook Pro. When touching the MacBook, once it hits about 100%, I can feel static vibration (e.g. when swiping with my finger e.g. above the Touchbar).

The standard (default) EU USB-C charger has only 2 pins and does not contain the iron grounding larger plugs have.

Is there a solution for this? Can static energy caused by lack of grounding damage the MacBook Pro in the long term when touching it (which would mean I can't charge and work at the same time)? I assume that the MacBook is working like a "cage of faraday", but rather double check. ;)

The static you feel is harmless. But, you always buy a grounded plug/extension cord from apple that will replace the 2 prong plug on the charger and that should get rid of the static. They should be listed on the Apple website.
 

jerryk

Contributor
Nov 3, 2011
7,059
3,937
SF Bay Area
Thanks. Why is such a plug not standard?

It used to be they came with both the 2 prong and the grounded 1 meter extension plug. But I suspect most people, like me, prefer to plug the charger directly in the wall and never used the grounded plug 1 meter long cord. So they quit shipping them. I know I never even pulled this cord out of the box of my last 2 MacBook Pros.
 
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Robertjan88

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 30, 2018
166
25
your installation ground is probably wired to neutral anyway
? What do you mean by that? :)
Spoke to a Genius over the phone. They also mentioned it isn't harmful, but if I don't also recommendes the extended cable (which is grounded) in case it was a problem for me.

Relieves it's not harmful, but will probably buy the extended cable anyhow. It will eliminate the static vibration and give me more room due to the additional cable. :)
 

Conutz

macrumors 6502
Oct 24, 2014
338
218
Joburg
? What do you mean by that? :)
Spoke to a Genius over the phone. They also mentioned it isn't harmful, but if I don't also recommendes the extended cable (which is grounded) in case it was a problem for me.

Relieves it's not harmful, but will probably buy the extended cable anyhow. It will eliminate the static vibration and give me more room due to the additional cable. :)
I’ve felt that vibration when moving my fingers across the aluminium - it feels weird, but it definitely felt mechanical rather than electrical. It doesn’t happen all the time and I’d guess it depends on the level of moisture on your hands...
 

Ploki

macrumors 601
Jan 21, 2008
4,202
1,475
? What do you mean by that? :)
Spoke to a Genius over the phone. They also mentioned it isn't harmful, but if I don't also recommendes the extended cable (which is grounded) in case it was a problem for me.

Relieves it's not harmful, but will probably buy the extended cable anyhow. It will eliminate the static vibration and give me more room due to the additional cable. :)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_and_neutral#Combining_neutral_with_ground
I’ve felt that vibration when moving my fingers across the aluminium - it feels weird, but it definitely felt mechanical rather than electrical. It doesn’t happen all the time and I’d guess it depends on the level of moisture on your hands...
it feels mechanical but it's electrical
 

mackiee

macrumors member
Mar 14, 2014
95
49
As said before, get the the extention cord with the grounded plug. I had exactly the same ”problem” and it went away (mostly if not all) when the charger is grounded.
 

Ploki

macrumors 601
Jan 21, 2008
4,202
1,475
As said before, get the the extention cord with the grounded plug. I had exactly the same ”problem” and it went away (mostly if not all) when the charger is grounded.
Grounding also works with children
 

magbarn

macrumors 68030
Oct 25, 2008
2,591
1,801
The sad thing is none of my MagSafe MacBooks did this. It’s a usb c charger MacBook issue. It bugs the heck out of me so thankfully had extension cords saved up from prior MacBooks which got rid of the problem
 

Ploki

macrumors 601
Jan 21, 2008
4,202
1,475
The sad thing is none of my MagSafe MacBooks did this. It’s a usb c charger MacBook issue. It bugs the heck out of me so thankfully had extension cords saved up from prior MacBooks which got rid of the problem
It's not a USB-C problem, and all MagSafe's did that without an extension...

it's a problem of apple being cheap
 
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y2jm14

macrumors newbie
Apr 7, 2019
1
0
I’ve felt that vibration when moving my fingers across the aluminium - it feels weird, but it definitely felt mechanical rather than electrical. It doesn’t happen all the time and I’d guess it depends on the level of moisture on your hands...


YES I FELT IT TOO. SOME vibration on the casing of MACBOOK PRO.

but is there any other way to prevent being grounded. I feel sometimes that there is static electricity,.
 

537635

macrumors 6502a
Mar 7, 2009
897
804
Slovenia, EU
That kind of installation is strictly illegal in Germany and probably in the rest of the EU as well...

Eastern Europe here. Anything built 1980 and later is definitely grounded. Before that it's a hit or miss. Might be properly grounded. Might be grounded to neutral. Might be grounded to lead water pipes and washing the dishes after turning on the stove will kill you (actually happened).
 

PinkyMacGodess

macrumors G3
Mar 7, 2007
8,269
4,352
Midwest America.
your installation ground is probably wired to neutral anyway

It's required by electric code. Weird, isn't it. I'm not a trained electrician, but have worked with enough of them over the years. Sub panels are not required, or recommended, to be 'bonded'. In fact it can cause serious issues. There is such a thing as a 'floating ground', and that is really bad too. My mom's house was build back in the, well WAY BACK, and it had some aluminum wiring, and also most outlets were just 2-wire, no ground. She went through several kitchen appliances, and computers. An APC power filter unit stopped the computer deaths, and some rewiring of specific outlets in the kitchen saved appliances too. Some of her wiring couldn't be replaced easily due to partial slab construction, and an attic that was just a hideous elevated crawl space, but I eventually got her house rewired and replumbed. (She had numerous sub panels, and still had screw in fuses!)

Yes, house electricity has a disturbing level of art in it, so it seems. But NEVER mess around in your mains circuit box. ESPECIALLY while energized! And, yes, get the extension cable. I have saved a bunch from dead Apple equipment, and they really come in handy since they have been cheating people out of them.

Working at a computer dealer, a guy comes in looking to 'buy a power cord'. The guy that talked to him was rather shocked. 'So let me get this straight, you want to *buy* a power cable?' Anyone with any amount of technology likely has a bunch of cables laying around. The manager told him to sell him 'any cable from 'the box'. Pick one with the wire tie still on it so it looks 'official'. Charge him ten bucks.' Apple charges, what, $15? But get it... When I was traveling, those things came in handy SO MANY TIMES!

EDIT: Apple charges $20 for the cable? Wow...
 
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