MacBook Pro 13-inch questions

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by doubledee, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. doubledee macrumors 6502

    doubledee

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Arizona
    #1
    I want to get a replacement laptop for my circa 2008, white MacBook and am looking at the current MacBook Pro 13-inch laptop.


    Some questions:
    1.) Some pimply kid at an Apple Store told me last night that I could NOT put a 750GB 7200RPM HDD in it, because it would overheat (and blowup)!

    True or not?

    (I have been running a 500GB 7200RPM Seagate in my white MacBook for the last few years with no noticeable issues...)


    2.) How hard would it be to change the HDD in this MacBook Pro?

    The same kid tried to scare me away, saying it would take "special" tools...


    Unfortunately, Apple's website says virtually nothing about the MacBook Pro... :confused:


    3.) Is it true that the body is now Aluminum?

    Is that good or bad or neither?


    4.) Does it come with a DVD RW so I can still burn CDs/DVDs for backup or whatever?


    5.) I assume it has basic things like...

    - USB ports?
    - Slot for Cable Lock?
    - Jack for 1/8" Headphones?


    6.) Is there anything else I should know about the MacBook Pro - either Hardware or Software related - that might change my decision to buy it??

    (This kids REALLY was trying to get me to buy a "modern" Retina, SSD Mac instead...) :cool:

    Thanks,


    Debbie
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
    Not true, you can put any 2.5" S-ATA HDD with a maximum height of 12.5 mm in it, currently there are 1 TB HDDs fulfilling that requirement, probably even 1.5 TB HDDs.

    Special tools like normal screwdrivers.
    MacBook, MacBook Pro: Replacing the Hard Disk Drive, transferring data to the new HDD

    the guide includes:
    • 0. Identify your MacBook or MacBook Pro
    • 1. Getting a new HDD
    • 2. Guides to replace the internal HDD with a newer one
    • 3. Transferring data from the old HDD to the new HDD
    • 4. Using the optical disk drive (ODD) slot for placing an SSD or HDD inside the MB/P (OPTIBAY)


    Specs are listed here: http://www.apple.com/macbook-pro/specs/

    Since late 2008, the 13" Unibody MacBook and since 2009 the 13" Unibody MacBook Pro is made of aluminium.

    Better at conducting heat, which makes many people think, the MBP is overheating.
    Those Macs in their heat - a sine of over-heating? - a short story by Mister GGJstudios
    Worse at not getting scratches, but more than okay, unless you handle it without care.

    The specs list an optical disk drive (ODD) with DVD and CD read and write capabilities.

    The specs list two USB 3.0 ports, a Kensington lock slot and a headphone port, amongst other ports.

    An update is expected in late summer, early autumn.

    ______________________________________________________
    This should answer most, if not all, of your battery questions:
    Apple Notebook Battery FAQ by GGJstudios
    The F.A.Q. includes the following topics:
    • BATTERY INFORMATION
    • BATTERY LIFE FROM A CHARGE
    • AC POWER
    • CALIBRATION
    • BATTERY LIFESPAN
    • CHECKING STATUS AND HEALTH
    • CHARGING
    • WHAT IS A CYCLE?
    • BATTERIES ARE NOT COVERED
    • BULGING OR SWELLING BATTERY


    ______________________________________________________
     
  3. A Hebrew macrumors 6502a

    A Hebrew

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #3
    If you are considering the normal (non-retina) 13" MBP I have one piece of advice for you:

    Don't.


    The current air is about the same price and performs at the same quality with faster storage speeds (Granted, it is less.)

    I would strongly recommend looking at the 13" rMBP first if you can afford it and if not the 13" air.
     
  4. wonderspark macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Oregon
    #4
    I think a 13" non-retina MBP is a fabulous deal for upgraders.

    I got a 2012 base model for $1019, then added 16GB RAM for $125 and 256GB Crucial M4 for about $200.

    $1344 for more performance *and* I can burn discs. I strongly recommend that choice over an Air or Retina for anyone that can use a screwdriver.
     
  5. maxosx macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2012
    Location:
    Southern California
    #5
    I agree completely.

    The way you've upgraded yours makes it an excellent laptop. Very fast, quiet & durable, it'll remain relevant & highly enjoyable for years. Not to mention that you've kept the price very modest in relation to its superb performance.
     
  6. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Location:
    Arizona
    #6
    Except for the fact that the SSD is *soldered* onto the motherboard!!

    Until forced to, I would NEVER, own a computer where I cannot easily remove the HDD myself.


    Debbie

    ----------

    I thought that the MacBook Pro - see link in OP - had a limitation of 8GB of RAM??


    That must be a SSD?



    Debbie
     
  7. B... macrumors 68000

    B...

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    #7
    No, it is not. It is simply in a proprietary form and OWC sells replacements. The only *soldered* part of a rMBP is the RAM.
     
  8. azentropy macrumors 68000

    azentropy

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    #8
    Apple only sells it that way. It, and even the two generations before it, support 16gb.

    If you don't really need an internal ODD, I'd recommend replacing the ODD with a SSD.

    The retina is nice and I know many people really like their MBA, but the limited storage options and soldered memory of "only" 8gb is a deal breaker for me.
     
  9. wonderspark macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

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    #9
    16GB works fine. I bought Crucial's 1600MHz kit and (yes) SSD direct from their website. :)
     
  10. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

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    #10
    Wow, THANKS for all of the information!! :)


    I bought a Seagate 750GB drive, which I believe is just 9.5mm, so I should be okay. (I looked on NewEgg but couldn't find the "height" for any of the 1TB HDD...)


    So the kid was wrong when he said that I needed some special Torx or whatever screwdriver?

    Sincerely,


    Debbie
     
  11. azentropy macrumors 68000

    azentropy

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    #11
    You will need a #00 philips to remove the bottom and a standard T6 torx screwdriver to take out the HD cage, but it doesn't take the special screws the rMBP and iPhone require.

    iFixIt of course has great guides with MJ!
     
  12. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Location:
    Arizona
    #12
    Thanks for the response.

    I started a new thread called Questions about Soldered SSD's..., as to not detract from this thread.

    Sincerely,


    Debbie

    ----------

    Oh, I was looking at all those links by simsaladimbamba, and I was sure I saw something that said 8GB was the system limit for RAM?

    Regardless, why would anyone need that much RAM?! :eek:

    (I have a measly 2GB on my old white MacBook, and it still does pretty good.)


    Maybe next week I'll start another thread on this whole SSD thingy. Stay tuned... ;)


    What is "MBA"??

    Sincerely,


    Debbie
     
  13. johnnnw macrumors 65816

    johnnnw

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    Feb 7, 2013
  14. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

    Joined:
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    #14
    Not that it applies here, but can you buy the special screws and screwdriver that are need for iPhones and Retina MacBook Pros?


    Debbie
     
  15. simsaladimbamba

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    Location:
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    #15
    The RAM guide I linked to mentions, that the 2011 MBP model supports 16 GB RAM (and thus the newer models should too, but I will update the guide soon), it might even support 32 GB RAM, but no 16 GB chips in that form factor exist to try it out.

    I have 8 GB of RAM in my MBP and it is not enough. Sadly it is a 2009 MBP, thus 8 GB is the limit.
    My new Mac supports 32 GB RAM and currently has 16 GB RAM, and I will probably get another 16 GB RAM next week, as I use that much RAM quite easily.

    Anyway, there are many RAM hungry applications, most often Adobe After Effects and similar Digital Content Creation (DCC) applications are mentioned, but also many other scientific applications can use RAM quite easily.
    Access to RAM is hundreds of times faster than access to the HDD, thus temporary data gets stored in the RAM if needed and can be accessed much faster when needed.
     
  16. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

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    #16
    If I bought a 13" MacBook Pro today - either online or in the store - would it be safe to assume that it is either a 2012 or 2013 model?

    And about how much would it cost me to upgrade from 8GB to 16GB of RAM?

    Could I just add an additional 8GB, or is there maybe only one bay, thus forcing me to buy a 16GB card?

    Lastly, is it correct that changing the RAM in a MacBook Pro is on about the same level as changing the HDD?


    Interesting!


    Debbie
     
  17. simsaladimbamba

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    #17
    As you probably mean the cMBP (classic MBP with SuperDrive and without Retina Display), then you get a 2012 model, since there is no 2013 model yet, those will (if) be released in late summer, early autumn.

    80 USD.

    The MBP has two slots for RAM, both slots are occupied by two 2 GB or by two 4 GB modules, thus you have to get two 8 GB modules.
    No 16 GB modules exist yet.

    Easier, since no TORX screwdriver is needed.

    Plenty of guides on how to do that can be found on YouTube or the guide I linked to.
     
  18. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

    Joined:
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    Arizona
    #18
    (Sorry for all of the questions!!!) :eek:

    Yes, I am interested in the 13" classic MacBook Pro.

    I heard in the past that you no longer get the operating on disk?! :eek:

    If I drop $1,500 on a new cMBP, then how do I get something on a CD/DVD so WHEN I need to rebuild my laptop, I have something?

    The Apple Tech I spoke to said, "Oh, you just download it!"

    (Yeah, that would really help if my HDD crashed... ) :rolleyes:


    Also, can you explain a little more about this whole "cloning" thingy?

    Honestly, I'm a weenie, and I have always just built machines from the ground up when I install a new HDD. (This is probably due to year of experience with Windows, where you were safer to start from scratch!!)

    If I install my 7200RPM 750GB Seagate HDD, should I strongly consider CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper?

    Or to be safer, should I just start from scratch? (Assuming there is a way to get a "Install DVD" for Mountain Lion?!)

    Sincerely,


    Debbie
     
  19. johnnnw macrumors 65816

    johnnnw

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    #19
    You don't need a disk, if you were to install a new harddrive and boot the machine it would take you to either "Internet Recovery" which installs Mountain Lion from Apple's servers.

    Or you can use a USB stick that you put ML onto using the Assistant that you then boot from by holding "Option" after the bing noise on startup.


    You only need to clone if you have information on the old one. If the drive (that came with the computer) is brand new it will only have ML on it so you wouldn't have any reason to clone it. Just install the new one and install the OS and you're good to go.
     
  20. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

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    #20
    And when I have no Internet access, then what?!

    Sorry, but I always want a PHYSICAL COPY of the Operating System - especially after spending $1,500!!


    If I buy a new 13" MacBook Pro with Lountain Lion on it, and I open the box and turn it on for the first time, then what steps do I need to do to create a bootable "Recovery DVD" like there aways was in the past?

    In other words, is there some application that will help me in making such a DVD?


    Right, and if I don't have Internet access, then I'd need a "Recovery DVD"...


    Debbie
     
  21. simsaladimbamba

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    #21

    No Mac coming with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion or OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion has physical restore media included.

    OS X: About OS X Recovery

    If you want to make a bootable installation medium, you can follow these steps:

     
  22. wonderspark macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

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    Location:
    Oregon
    #22
    As I understand it, new Macs can use the built-in wifi to download the installation software from Apple's servers without even booting up to an internal disk, which is why you don't need a recovery disc. However, if you have no wifi available, then you'd need at least a bootable thumb drive installer.

    Apple assumes the world has wifi in order for their system to work like this.
     
  23. doubledee thread starter macrumors 6502

    doubledee

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    #23
    simsaladimbamba,

    Thanks for the links, but I feel like this is still a problem for me...

    1.) I am on the road a long ways from home and not returning. The only place I can do downloading is somewhere like McDonalds.

    Downloading 8GB on McDonalds Free Wi-Fi would never work.


    2.) I just got my first ever Mobile Hotspot from AT&T, but I am also paying about $70 with taxes for 6GB for the month.

    So downloading 8GB is not my first choice!!!!


    3.) I just don't see how anyone could download 8GB unless they are at home and can leave their Internet connection on for a day or two?!


    You mean to tell me that is my *only* option?!

    What are people supposed to do when their HDD crashes?!

    Really confused here... :confused:


    Debbie
     
  24. wonderspark macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
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    Oregon
    #24
    About cloning:

    I've been cloning my original, Apple-installed boot disk since I got it from Apple in 2009, using both Carbon Copy Cloner and SuperDuper! It was 10.6.2 if I recall, and I've since updated it to 10.6.8. Just recently, I took one of my clone boot backups and did a clean install from my thumb drive installer, just to verify it works, but then I re-cloned it back to my original boot clone. Since my boot is running perfectly with all my many, many programs installed, there is no reason to do a clean install, but knowing I can if I want is wonderful.

    I also cloned my 13" MBP 500GB HDD to an SSD and installed it in the laptop, rather than go through a fresh install. That's using Mountain Lion, so I can confirm that CCC and SuperDuper! work on that system as well. I use the original 500GB HDD (slow and painful as it is) as a backup clone, should the SSD have problems. For now, I'm keeping the CD/DVD Superdrive in the 13" laptop, as I do need to burn discs for people pretty often.

    Tuesday, I get my second laptop, a new 15" MBP. For that one, I'll be installing two SSDs, one of which will be the new M500... 960GB! I'm pretty excited about that.

    ----------

    Just keep a clone handy. Given your situation on the road, it's the best option. That way, you never have to reinstall any of your software in case of disk failure. It works.
     
  25. simsaladimbamba

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    #25
    What about using an Apple Store? Ask an employee for help, they offer this service and they probably have an updated version already lying around. It will only work for your new MBP though or if you provide prove of a previous purchase of OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, or they let you purchase it via one of the Macs there, though as a new MBP already has OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion on it, you do not have to pay for the download.

    It depends on the internet connection, I have a dial up service via wired modem and can download 8 GB, though the OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion installer DMG it is more like 4.44 GB, in under three hours (I have 1.2 MB/s download speeds, which are average, many have higher and even higher).

    For the installer, yes.

    Have a backup. I currently have a new Mac (Hackintosh), which has a 256 GB SSD for the OS and several HDDs in it. One HDD does have two partitions for cloning the SSD to it via CarbonCopyCloner (version 3.4.7 is still free and available for download here and works with Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion and OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion), and in the case of SSD failure, I can easily boot into one of those backups in a matter of minutes and go on working and restore to a new SSD in a matter of an hour.
    As for using a mobile MBP, you can always get a USB 3.0 HDD to clone and backup your primary HDD to, as backing up is vital anyways.

    (I backup my five HDDs inside the new Mac via a USB 3.0 dock and several bare HDDs).
     

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