Macbook Pro Causing lacerations

Fasailmac

macrumors member
Original poster
Jun 20, 2009
71
0
My macbook pro keeps creating marks on my wrists. They last for about 2 days and there pretty deep. I only have 3 days left for my return period. Should i go and get it exchanged or is this unavoidable.
 

Fasailmac

macrumors member
Original poster
Jun 20, 2009
71
0
my posture isnt perfect but couldn't this be considered as a design flaw. I mean i like to put my palms on the palm rests.
 

NT1440

macrumors G5
May 18, 2008
12,141
13,999
my posture isnt perfect but couldn't this be considered as a design flaw. I mean i like to put my palms on the palm rests.
Ur only gonna be able to have ur wrists laying on the edge if you have bad typing form.

That said, i know a good amount of posters here have used very fine sandpaper to smooth out the edge a bit with good results, try that.
 

ozreth

macrumors 65816
Nov 5, 2009
1,297
60
I've seen a few posts like this and just don't get it. When I type my wrists are in between the bottom row of keys and the edge of the laptop, I cant imagine how anybodys wrists could be laying on the edge while typing. Also, It seems like youd have to go through a lot of trouble to have your wrists just resting on the edge.
 

Sedulous

macrumors 68020
Dec 10, 2002
2,326
1,579
Are you using a 13"? Otherwise, as others have pointed out, I don't see how you could type while your wrists rest against the bottom edge of the computer.
 

nj-mac-user

macrumors 6502
Jun 1, 2009
438
61
TX
No, it's a user flaw.
Definitely user flaw otherwise you'd hear reports of this everywhere. Even so, can the edge actually even cause a laceration? I mean its not like its sharp enough to cut through the skin. What are you leaning your whole body into the edge when you type??
 

zipa

macrumors 65816
Feb 19, 2010
1,442
1
No, it's a user flaw.
No, it's a design flaw, and a really silly one at that. Fortunately it can be easily fixed by a file/dremel/whatnot. There are millions of guides on the Interweb that'll show you how it's done...
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
No, it's a design flaw, and a really silly one at that. Fortunately it can be easily fixed by a file/dremel/whatnot. There are millions of guides on the Interweb that'll show you how it's done...
It's not a design flaw. It's just that Apple didn't design a notebook around people who have poor typing posture/habits. There's a handful of people who have a problem with it, due to their incorrect hand position. The millions who know how to type on a notebook don't have a problem, or you'd see thousands of posts about it... even news articles or (in this lawsuit-happy world) a recall.

To blame Apple for this is to have the childish viewpoint that "the world revolves around me, and if something isn't to my liking, it's someone else's fault... never mine!"
 

jjahshik32

macrumors 603
Sep 4, 2006
5,259
1
You know I've used the unibody macbook pro since it was first released and the only way I found out about these wrist issues was by reading about it on the forums.

I've never had any issues with the wrist. And I didnt know it was a problem either.
 

zipa

macrumors 65816
Feb 19, 2010
1,442
1
It's not a design flaw. It's just that Apple didn't design a notebook around people who have poor typing posture/habits. There's a handful of people who have a problem with it, due to their incorrect hand position. The millions who know how to type on a notebook don't have a problem, or you'd see thousands of posts about it... even news articles or (in this lawsuit-happy world) a recall.

To blame Apple for this is to have the childish viewpoint that "the world revolves around me, and if something isn't to my liking, it's someone else's fault... never mine!"
Which cave do you live in? The net is full of posts complaining about this. If there was nothing wrong with it, nobody would Dremel down a $3000+ notebook, would they?

Also, as a user, can I influence the sharpness of the edge? No. As a designer, can I influence the sharpness of the edge? Yes. Yet you somehow manage to think that the user is at fault?

The fact that someone manages to "lacerate" their wrists on the edge sounds a tad weird, I'll give you that.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
The net is full of posts complaining about this.
Add up all such posts and you'll find they're a fraction of 1% of MBP users.
If there was nothing wrong with it, nobody would Dremel down a $3000+ notebook, would they?
Why do people do all sorts of stupid things? Who knows?
Also, as a user, can I influence the sharpness of the edge?
http://www.apple.com/feedback
As a designer, can I influence the sharpness of the edge?
You're not the MBP designer.
Yet you somehow manage to think that the user is at fault?
Absolutely not! I don't think the user is at fault. I know the user is at fault!
The fact that someone manages to "lacerate" their wrists on the edge sounds a tad weird, I'll give you that.
On that point, I agree.
 

highscheme

macrumors regular
Jun 10, 2009
182
3
My macbook pro keeps creating marks on my wrists. They last for about 2 days and there pretty deep. I only have 3 days left for my return period. Should i go and get it exchanged or is this unavoidable.

Waiting for Arrandale MBP updates keeps creating marks on my wrists. Is this unavoidable?
 

Jazwire

macrumors 6502a
Jun 20, 2009
896
115
127.0.0.1
I've seen a few posts like this and just don't get it. When I type my wrists are in between the bottom row of keys and the edge of the laptop, I cant imagine how anybodys wrists could be laying on the edge while typing. Also, It seems like youd have to go through a lot of trouble to have your wrists just resting on the edge.
How do you use the trackpad, without resting your hands (palms)on the sharp edges?
I love my MacBook Pro but using the trackpad for browsing isn't very comfortable. Not sure how you can deny that.
 

Gorilla Power

macrumors 6502
Mar 19, 2010
478
0
You could use a simple notebook elevating stand. Not only does it let you have a much better rest for your wrist and keyboard reach, it also helps keep the notebook cool by circulating air underneath.

I've used a Logitech Alto Express stand for a long time with excellent results. It comes very cheap and has fantastic acrylic build quality and finish. If you don't feel like investing at all, just put and center-align the edge of a thick book on the base of the notebook to angle it up from behind. Hope this helps.

 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
You could use a simple notebook elevating stand.
That looks like an excellent solution..... if you want to accelerate the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome! :rolleyes:

From one of many, many sites (and doctors) that say the same thing:
Computer Workstation Ergonomics
  • A padded wrist rest will help to keep your wrist in a straight and neutral position while typing and keep your arms off the sharp edges of the work surface.
  • Do not rest your wrists or hands on a palm or wrist rest when you are keying. These rests are designed to provide support only during breaks from keying.
  • The slope of the keyboard may need to be adjusted so that it is flat in order that your wrists are straight, and not bent back while you are typing.
 

JaZzMaN251

macrumors regular
Nov 2, 2009
107
2
Apple Order Status page
You could use a simple notebook elevating stand. Not only does it let you have a much better rest for your wrist and keyboard reach, it also helps keep the notebook cool by circulating air underneath.

I've used a Logitech Alto Express stand for a long time with excellent results. It comes very cheap and has fantastic acrylic build quality and finish. If you don't feel like investing at all, just put and center-align the edge of a thick book on the base of the notebook to angle it up from behind. Hope this helps.

Actually, this is the nightmare of ergonomics. If your laptop is seated like that, no way you can type in a way that is comfortable for a long time. Hands, wrists, and forearms should be straight, in-line and roughly parallel to the floor.

Don't take this wrong, but I personally wouldn't recommend to type on a laptop that is in such a stand. Put a keyboard in front of it and you're fine (for long periods of typing time that is... It's still a laptop ofcourse...) :)
 

Gorilla Power

macrumors 6502
Mar 19, 2010
478
0
Actually, this is the nightmare of ergonomics. If your laptop is seated like that, no way you can type in a way that is comfortable for a long time. Hands, wrists, and forearms should be straight, in-line and roughly parallel to the floor.

Don't take this wrong, but I personally wouldn't recommend to type on a laptop that is in such a stand. Put a keyboard in front of it and you're fine (for long periods of typing time that is... It's still a laptop ofcourse...) :)
That looks like an excellent solution..... if you want to accelerate the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome! :rolleyes:

From one of many, many sites (and doctors) that say the same thing:
Computer Workstation Ergonomics


With such a stand you don't bend your wrist from the radius-ulna joint, you rest your whole arms from elbow below. The arms then remain straight. That couldn't cause carpal tunnel.

I have big bear like hands and paws and I personally find typing much more comfortable with such a stand. :) Anyways, the primary motive here was to avoid deep 'lacerations'..
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
With such a stand you don't bend your wrist from the radius-ulna joint, you rest your whole arms from elbow below. The arms then remain straight. That couldn't cause carpal tunnel.

I have big bear like hands and paws and I personally find typing much more comfortable with such a stand. :) Anyways, the primary motive here was to avoid deep 'lacerations'..
The point is, you shouldn't be resting your arms on anything while you type. And trading lacerations for carpal tunnel syndrome (which typing with your wrists bent up like that WILL cause) is hardly an improvement! If the OP uses proper posture and arm/wrist/hand position, they won't have to worry about lacerations OR CTS.
 

Gorilla Power

macrumors 6502
Mar 19, 2010
478
0
The point is, you shouldn't be resting your arms on anything while you type. And trading lacerations for carpal tunnel syndrome (which typing with your wrists bent up like that WILL cause) is hardly an improvement! If the OP uses proper posture and arm/wrist/hand position, they won't have to worry about lacerations OR CTS.
I understood he was saying that the MBP edges are too sharp ? Either that or he must have very delicate skin.. anyhoo, I'm praising a stand from my own experience, just saying it was very comfortable as long as I used it.