MacBook Pro getting very hot on bootcamp as fans are not turning up

T1M_MC

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
England
I have installed windows on my Macbook pro 2018 though bootcamp to try and play the casual games but I have noticed the fans are simply not kicking and the temperatures are very dangerously near 100 degrees Celsius.
Currently Mac fan control does don't support models with the T2 chip so is there any way to make the fans kick in more as I do not hear them even when gaming.
 

Thysanoptera

macrumors 6502a
Jun 12, 2018
732
727
Pittsburgh, PA
Set the speed to constant value under MacOS and reboot to bootcamp, the fans will continue on last value. If you have macsfancontrol set to auto with some custom curve they will stay on last value, auto will not work, so if you rebooted while they were at 2k rpm, they will stay at 2k rpm under Windows no matter what.
 

zshane1125

macrumors regular
Jul 16, 2018
113
142
I was having the same issue, ended up just deleting bootcamp lol.

My Mac was scorching hot idle, was anxious as hell.
 

T1M_MC

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
England
Set the speed to constant value under MacOS and reboot to bootcamp, the fans will continue on last value. If you have macsfancontrol set to auto with some custom curve they will stay on last value, auto will not work, so if you rebooted while they were at 2k rpm, they will stay at 2k rpm under Windows no matter what.
I always have
I was having the same issue, ended up just deleting bootcamp lol.

My Mac was scorching hot idle, was anxious as hell.
I didn't realize my CPU was basically at 100 degrees celsius for 15 mins do you think this will have permanent damage some of the internals?
 

leman

macrumors G4
Oct 14, 2008
10,155
4,680
I didn't realize my CPU was basically at 100 degrees celsius for 15 mins do you think this will have permanent damage some of the internals?
This is expected temperature for a machine running under high load (of which gaming is a prime example), it’s designed to run like this and will not have any noteworthy negative impact on its internals or lifespan.

Calm down and just use your laptop. It’s fine.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
64,089
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Boston
I always have


I didn't realize my CPU was basically at 100 degrees celsius for 15 mins do you think this will have permanent damage some of the internals?
It can't be good and i disagree that is normal to incur 100c. My windows laptop comes no where near 100c under load
 

T1M_MC

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
England
It can't be good and i disagree that is normal to incur 100c. My windows laptop comes no where near 100c under load
Do you think even for a short period it will be very bad I mean the cpu should be able to withstand temperatures of 100 degrees before it shuts down.
 

maflynn

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May 3, 2009
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Do you think even for a short period it will be very bad I mean the cpu should be able to withstand temperatures of 100 degrees before it shuts down.
My personal opinion no. Other posters are correct that the CPU is designed to incur 100c, my contention is other components are not as hardened and over time the high temp will cause issues.

Its true that the CPUs do run hotter then prior generations but many other computer makers have accounted for this and improved the thermal design of their laptops. Sadly, not so with Apple, they're using an enclosure that doesn't evacuate the heat efficiently. In bootcamp they only provide a passing attempt to provide drivers and support so the issue is exacerbated imo.
 

leman

macrumors G4
Oct 14, 2008
10,155
4,680
It can't be good and i disagree that is normal to incur 100c. My windows laptop comes no where near 100c under load
Your laptop is a gaming-optimised machine and its manufacturer limits the upper thermal range of the CPU to 90C instead of the default 100C. This occurs at the expense of being larger and having higher external temperature under load. There are plenty of laptops that use the default Intel threshold of 100C.

Do you think even for a short period it will be very bad I mean the cpu should be able to withstand temperatures of 100 degrees before it shuts down.
The 100C is a safe operating temperature according to the CPU manufacturer and Apple's laptop are designed to make the full use of the ranges permitted by the specs. This has been the case for quite a time now. If you want to avoid your CPU getting this hot, you have to manipulate the specs artificially, by throttling the CPU power draw (there are software tools to do this).

P.S. Yes, running at higher temperatures does negatively impact the life of electronic components but tis nothing that you will notice in normal operation. These chips can run at 100C for years of continuous operation. This will cut their expected lifetime, but it's not like you expect your machine to be usable for 15+ years...
 

maflynn

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Your laptop is a gaming-optimised machine and its manufacturer limits the upper thermal range of the CPU to 90C instead of the default 100C. This occurs at the expense of being larger and having higher external temperature under load. .
Since when are Thinkpads gaming laptops :rolleyes: They are anything but, Thinkpads are marketed to enterprise and what not.

My thermal range is not 90c, but rather I live comfortably in the 50 to 60c range, push the laptop hard and I see the 70s. Its has approached the 80c range on occasions but that's rarity.

There are plenty of laptops that use the default Intel threshold of 100C
Yup and they trottling, Dell XPS 15" is another laptop that struggles with thermal management and throttles like the MBP, but please don't excuse apple's inefficient design as the norm, not every laptop is hitting 100c that simply is not the case.
 

leman

macrumors G4
Oct 14, 2008
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Since when are Thinkpads gaming laptops :rolleyes: They are anything but, Thinkpads are marketed to enterprise and what not.
From Lenovo's own website:

From multi-monitor support to a rich MR/VR experience and even to intensive gaming, the ThinkPad X1 Extreme handles demanding computing tasks without a hitch.
My thermal range is not 90c, but rather I live comfortably in the 50 to 60c range, push the laptop hard and I see the 70s. Its has approached the 80c range on occasions but that's rarity.
External reviews show that X1 Extreme goes to 90C under high load [1]

Yup and they trottling, Dell XPS 15" is another laptop that struggles with thermal management and throttles like the MBP,
Dell XPS thermal range fro the CPU is similar to your X1... and both XPS and X1 throttle heavily under stress test [1] - unlike the MBP with Vega. Throttling of this sort has nothing to do with the temperature limits or the cooling solution, it's all about power management and intelligent power distribution to components. And its application is also very niche, since you won't be running a laptop like that anyway.

but please don't excuse apple's inefficient design as the norm, not every laptop is hitting 100c that simply is not the case.
Depends on your definition of "efficient". The standard use of the term often revolves around "using less to achieve more". Apple's design is hard to beat in terms of efficiency — they use the entire spec range available to them to design a minimal thermal solution that allows for spec-compliant performance of the machine. Cooling the CPU to 90C instead of 100C at 45W power consumption is not necessarily efficient — its more conservative and "safe", sure, but it's not free to get. You pay for it in some other way, be it higher fan speed, open air vents or a larger chassis. As I wrote in the other thread, I'd rather have a CPU that runs 10C hotter than a chassis that runs 10C hotter. As a user, I don't notice the former at all. I do notice the later since it burns my knees and destroys my desks.

Apple's cooling is certainly not as effective as that of X1 Extreme and other laptops, but it's extremely efficient, since it gets the job done very well and allows within 5% of X1 Extreme's sustained performance despite being 25% smaller and not using an open bottom case for air intake.

[1] https://www.notebookcheck.net/Lenovo-ThinkPad-X1-Extreme-i7-4K-HDR-GTX-1050-Ti-Max-Q-Laptop-Review.335608.0.html[/QUOTE]
 

maflynn

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No matter how you slice it, and defend apple, the fact remains that there are models that run a lot cooler then the MBPs, and even the rumored 16" MBP is being developed because apple designed themselves into a corner with such a thin corner they painted themselves in.

Regardless of it being efficient or effective (I think we're being a bit pedantic) the MBP runs hotter then many other laptops. Apple also seems to prefer quieter laptops and so the fans don't ramp up until temps are higher then other laptops. Internally hot temps are not good for electronics and the long term health of a laptop is in question in my opinion. I know many other people disagree and that's fine. You or others should use your own laptops the way you're comfortable, I'm more conservative and prefer cooler temps.
 

Ma2k5

macrumors 68020
Dec 21, 2012
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London
Although the chips are designed to operate at 100c according to Intel, it is anyone's guess as to the end result of the laptop itself having that much heat in the machine for prolonged use. I mean it might be completely fine but it might also make it more likely that a hardware failure occurs somewhere. The failure is unlikely to be that the CPU has fried itself, but the fact that their is a very hot environment inside the laptop itself.

I would caveat to say that it is unusual for the fans not to be on in Bootcamp though, when I did some gaming on my 2014 MBP under boot camp, the fans were out full blast and quite noisy. I wonder if it is driver issues?
 

Thysanoptera

macrumors 6502a
Jun 12, 2018
732
727
Pittsburgh, PA
Dell XPS thermal range fro the CPU is similar to your X1... and both XPS and X1 throttle heavily under stress test [1] - unlike the MBP with Vega. Throttling of this sort has nothing to do with the temperature limits or the cooling solution, it's all about power management and intelligent power distribution to components. And its application is also very niche, since you won't be running a laptop like that anyway.
Just wanted to point out, that your i9/Vega 20 had lower 3dmark physics scores than my i7/555x, thus I wouldn't by so certain about that intelligent power distribution since Vega is almost 20% faster than 555x at the same TDP and throttles down to about stock 555x power levels when stressed together with CPU. XPS15 on the other hand maintains max GPU clocks when stressed and thus you get lower CPU clocks like in the notebookcheck review. The difference is, if you don't like such priority, you can change it.

I bought the GS65, it is 5% larger footprint and 5% bigger height than MBP, same with weight, not noticeable. If I run Cinebench and Heaven together (looping Cinebech over and over again), I'm getting about 800 score in Cinebench and about 16% lower score in Heaven in such scenario (still 2x higher than Vega 20 in MBP running on its own - 1900 vs 950 or so), all the while the keys and palm rest area remain cool, as in significantly cooler than my skin temperature. On its own the CPU can maintain maximum turbo boost of 3.9 GHz indefinitely (Cinebench 1250, it is clock limited, actually i9 would make sense in this chassis), when stressed with Heaven it oscillates between 3.9 and 3.6 GHz (keep in mind Heaven also uses some CPU). I wish it had build quality of an MBP, or better yet, that Apple made a laptop with 5% larger dimensions that matches it, but honestly it is not that bad.

I meant I always have had the macfanscontrol set to a custom setting with a custom temperature curve so I get why the fans don't kick in on bootcamp
I can't game on MBP, the keys surface is too hot to rest fingers on them for longer than couple of seconds. Try the trick with settings fans to fixed value in MacOS and rebooting, it helps, like 4000 rpms on both, if you have 560/555x that will be all you need. If you have Vega set both to max.
 
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leman

macrumors G4
Oct 14, 2008
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No matter how you slice it, and defend apple
I do not defend Apple, I explain what lies behind their design and why its not per se "worse". All designs have advantages and disadvantages. Your X1 does some things better, but it comes with its own disadvantages. Users have to be aware of all this, plain and simple.

Personally, as a user, I would not buy a laptop like the X1 for two very simple reasons. First, I sometimes need to work in cramped environments and have the laptop on my lap, which doesn't work well with a bottom air-intake design (the MBp has a side air intake, which won't be blocked). Second, I do not want a laptop that reaches over 50C on its bottom under load since I have a rather nice desk which I would like to stay this way.

Internally hot temps are not good for electronics and the long term health of a laptop is in question in my opinion. I know many other people disagree and that's fine. You or others should use your own laptops the way you're comfortable, I'm more conservative and prefer cooler temps.
Exactly, what we talk about is opinions. The fact of it that neither me nor you know what is the exact effect of the temperatures on laptop longevity. What we do know however is a) there are studies that show that complex controller chips are expected to operate at 100C for as long as 10 years — that is assuming continuous 24/7 operation at that temperature, no less — and b) that Apple is confident enough to give you full warranty on these things. There are a lot of people who run these laptops under load — if that would be that detrimental to laptop lifetime, Apple would be ruining themselves with all those free replacement.

Hence, my recommendation for the normal user — it doesn't matter.

and even the rumored 16" MBP is being developed because apple designed themselves into a corner with such a thin corner they painted themselves in.
Oh come on, we know nothing about that 16". For all we know its just a screen with smaller bezels. I measured it, a 16" display would fit inside the current enclosure. Not to mention that the current design has better thermals than any of their previous MacBook Pros... It's not a Pro desktop where you might want to put a 500W GPU.
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Just wanted to point out, that your i9/Vega 20 had lower 3dmark physics scores than my i7/555x, thus I wouldn't by so certain about that intelligent power distribution since Vega is almost 20% faster than 555x at the same TDP and throttles down to about stock 555x power levels when stressed together with CPU. XPS15 on the other hand maintains max GPU clocks when stressed and thus you get lower CPU clocks like in the notebookcheck review. The difference is, if you don't like such priority, you can change it.
Exactly my point, its about balancing power budget allocation. I don't really think that is that important or interesting since again, nobody uses a laptop like this. It's mostly a rather pointless bragging thing in the end.

I bought the GS65, it is 5% larger footprint and 5% bigger height than MBP, same with weight, not noticeable.
Yes, GS65 has excellent thermals, better than most in the usual bunch. But as previously stated, I don't care for laptops with bottom air intake and I am fine with my performance suffering a bit as a result. Overall usability is more important than absolute performance in my book. The GS65 is great for its purpose though. I just wound't consider it a general purpose business notebook.