Macbook pro heating up

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Scorcher, May 23, 2017.

  1. Scorcher macrumors newbie

    Scorcher

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    #1
    Recently i noticed that my Macbook pro is getting really hot. I have a 15 inch 2016 Macbook pro, and usually it's fine. I use it for streaming videos, light work and some gaming. When the laptop is in laptop mode (not connected to any peripherals) it heat level's are ok. but when I connect it to an external display it start's to really heat up. so hot that it heart to touch it.
    I use the official apple usb c digital multiport adapter (that has usbc c, usb a and hdmi) and an hdmi cable connected to a 27 inch monitor.
    Is this normal? did anybody experience something like this?
    I'm a little worried that the heat will damage my Macbook
     
  2. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #2
    It's fine. Plugging into an external monitor immediately activates the dGPU which will run pretty toasty.

    It's worth bearing in mind that although the system may feel hot to the touch, that's because the aluminium casing is partly used to displace heat, so the internal components are actually running cooler than they otherwise would be in a plastic enclosure which feels cooler to the touch.

    TL;DR: don't worry at all, it's perfectly normal. :)
     
  3. Scorcher thread starter macrumors newbie

    Scorcher

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    #3
    OK. Can you tell me what's a normal temperature for the Macbook? like what is too high?
     
  4. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #4
    Err, probably around 85C for the GPU, 95C for the CPU. But if either of them approach the thermal limit, they'll throttle to cool down. Worst case scenario it'll shut off to prevent damage.
     
  5. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #5
    The CPU is designed to run at temps up to 100C, the GPU at temps at around 80C (or a bit higher). Now, if you constantly observe these temps even with light workloads, then something is probably wrong with the cooling system.
     

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