MacBook Pro Issue/Apple Care

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by scoobierules, Apr 29, 2011.

  1. scoobierules macrumors member

    scoobierules

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #1
    I sent my Macbook Pro in for repair this week due to heating issues. My CPU and GPU were running around 173 degrees and the fans ran non stop(around 2500 RPM). Apple replaced the mother board, the superdrive and a optical cable. They said they fixed it and tested it all day before it was sent back to me today.

    I open the box up today and had the computer on for about 5 minutes and the same issue with heat started up again and the fans were running at about 3500 rpm.Needless, to say, I was not happy.

    Apple wants me to send the unit back again. I have an issue with the fact they said they did all of this work. However, they received the unit at 5:30am and it was repaired and ready to be sent back to me by 11:00 that day. Is that right?

    Is this issue with heat something I should worry about? Apple stated they tested everything and it was fine. I ran Tech Tool pro and it came back with issues. I am very frustrated with the situation now. Any advise?
     
  2. AlphaDogg macrumors 68040

    AlphaDogg

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    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Boulder, CO
    #2
    Not to go all GGJstudios on you, but 173 degrees and 2500RPM is perfectly normal. I know this isn't what you wanted to hear, but it's just how it is.
     
  3. Al Coholic macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Why then would Apple replace the motherboard?
     
  4. altecXP macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    #4

    No it's not. The machine should idle at 2000 RPM. I have two Core i based laptops and both unless I'm watching a video, or have a VM open run at 2000 RPM. 173* is almost 80*, that's way high unless he's putting a load on the computer.
     
  5. AlphaDogg macrumors 68040

    AlphaDogg

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    #5
    Honestly, I have no idea.
     
  6. scoobierules thread starter macrumors member

    scoobierules

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #6
    Thanks for the response, that is the thing, I am not doing anything on the computer when it happens other than surfing the internet. I do not have any additional programs opened other than safari. I could see if it was being used for Gaming. But, just every day stuff? I do not remember the fans running constantly and I feel the heat coming through the keyboard. Any other Macbook pro users have similar issues? I really do not want to send it back if they are not going to do anything with it.
     
  7. scoobierules thread starter macrumors member

    scoobierules

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #7
    Here is a snap shot of the reading using istat
     

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  8. iStudentUK, Apr 30, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011

    iStudentUK macrumors 65816

    iStudentUK

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    London
    #8
    Fans will always be on, but should be at 2000rpm when nothing is happening.

    Don't use your crazy farenheight scale, but in civilised speak somewhere in the 50-60oC range is good when nothing much is happening. Under load 80oC is fine, it will shut itself down before becoming dangerously hot.

    Edit- ignore the thumbs down, no idea how I accidentally pressed that button!
     
  9. iMackPro, Apr 30, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011

    iMackPro macrumors 6502

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    #9
     
  10. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #10
    78C, the temp you reported in Fahrenheit, is fine for the 2011 MBP. Especially if the fans are running at 3500RPM. And especially if the computer is running under load.

    Under light/moderate use, the temps shouldn't get above 50~65C.

    Number crunching apps - 80C is the upper limit for my taste, and most laptops under heavy load don't get above 80C. The i7 does run hot, but the documented reports of poorly-applied thermal paste are sufficient evidence: http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook-Pro-15-Inch-Unibody-Early-2011-Teardown/4990/2

    When idle, my MBP hovers at 40C. That's fantastic. Under light use, it gets between 48~52C. When I have Parallels running XP, 48~61C is reported. (that's the CPU temp, not the temp of any individual core, which would be slightly (~8C) higher...)

    Playing UT2004 in Parallels, the MBP gets to 76C. Fair. Add in Prime95 to stress the system WHILE playing, to simulate full load and multitasking between game and background render, the temp jumps up to 93C. That's too high; I can recreate the same conditions on my little token PC notebook with an i7 quad processor and temps remain at 76C.

    To me, anything over 80C is a cause for concern, with being over 90C a massive cause of concern. (the CPU is said to run up to 100C, but that's beside the point. There's a reason companies have special rooms, temperature controlled, for their servers - or why any computer has fans and other cooling mechanisms. Heat damages over time. The more the heat and the more the constant level of it, the sooner the electronics fail. Nobody is immune from the laws of physics, which is genuinely unfortunate...)

    Competing notebooks with the same CPU and comparable GPUs do get in the mid-70s at full load, which includes synthetic benchmark/test apps. (Though 3D and fractal rendering apps would push the system very high too.)

    Suggested recommendation: Use the following sources to compel them to work on your machine:

    http://my2011macbookpro.com/replacing-thermal-paste-on-the-cpu-and-gpu-results/

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2764570?start=345&tstart=0
    (the Apple store that one person referenced was able to apply Arctic Silver compound)

    Always get AppleCare - any laptop owner should get extra warranty coverage (and treat the laptop with respect as well!)

    Now, under MANY scenarios the high temps are okay (think limited use.) If you do a lot of number crunching and the CPU stays over 90C for long periods of time, its lifespan will go down.

    The Intel CPU will throttle at 100C, and if it gets too hot the computer will shut down - fans and all. That's ANY Intel-based computer, Mac or Windows. (And it's pathetic; if the whole thing shuts down, fans and all, it would take far more time to get the hot air out of the laptop than to turn all off except the fans. Which means greater chance of residual damage despite the purported failsafe. Oops! Somebody should hire me as an engineer, for crying out loud... quality is important IMHO. )
     
  11. scoobierules thread starter macrumors member

    scoobierules

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #11
    Thanks again for all of the help! Wouldn't they have to redo the thermal paste when the motherboard was replaced? I am still not sure what the issue is for my machine. Some people say it is normal, while other say there is an issue. Even the apple tech over the phone said it was an issue. I have Applecare now. So, I should not worry about it. But, if it is going to shorten the life on my mac, I want it fixed.
     
  12. scoobierules thread starter macrumors member

    scoobierules

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #12
    Sent my mbp back today. I spoke with someone at AppleCare and he stated that the temps. Were runningbtoo high. So, we will see what they do to fix the issue. He seemed a little clueless. Hopefully they will get it right. I requested they replace it if they can not fix it and it was escalated to two different levels. So, we will see. Thanks for all the help
     
  13. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #13
    They might not necessarily re-do the thermal paste. (If I choose to have mine done, I'll go in with my own tube of Arctic Silver 5).

    They might re-do it, but it depends on how they receive their logic boards. Do the boards contain soldered chips and heatsinks pre-applied, or do they manually have to move the CPU, GPU, etc, from the old board to the new one? If the latter, then they will obviously re-apply compound. If the former, then there's really nothing for them to do by default. :( It depends on how cognizant a particular technician is.

    I re-read your OP. It doesn't really say if you're running apps, or if it's sitting there idle. My own 17" MBP, running idle, in a 22C environment, runs at an awesome 35C. Under load, or as much as I can right now, it gets up to 88~89C. If it's getting up to 175F ( 80C) while idle (or even under light usage (e.g. file copy, web browsing with a couple of open windows)), then there's a big problem.
     

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