MacBook Pro or iMac for 1080p video editing

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ChristineMC, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. ChristineMC macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    #1
    Hi!

    I'm going MAC for the first time and I'm interested in buying a setup I can easily edit my Canon T3i 600d 1080 videos. This is personal use only, but I like to record my daughter's soccer games a lot and make small highlight videos out of them. I'd like a MAC that can first and foremost play my .mov files sooc without any choppiness as well as easy editing within the timeline on either premeire CS5 or FCP. I don't mind long rendering time as long as the actual editing time has no issue such as choppy playback which is my problem now on my crappy PC.

    I'm mainly looking at the 2012 (from specs I've found) 13" Mac Book Pro would this meet my needs? Thanks for any advice/help.
     
  2. heisenberg123 macrumors 603

    heisenberg123

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario
    #2
    well there isnt a 2012 release yet, are you sure you dont mean 2011?

    the 13" does not have the greatest video card, but im not sure that would effect your editing
     
  3. simsaladimbamba

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    #3
    My 2007 iMac and 2009 MBP can edit HD footage coming from a Canon 5D Mark II, if properly transcoded.
    iMovie will do just fine for you, as it imports the footage and transcodes it to an editable format.
    If you want more, you can also use FCP X (cheaper than Premiere Pro - you allude to CS5), which also imports and transcodes the footage for easier editing.

    In short, any current Mac will be able to edit 1080p footage if properly transcoded.

    Transcoding > changing the format and encoding of a file
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Location:
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    #4
    I'd consider either the 15" MBP or an iMac and the choice of either one would boil down to your mobility needs. If its just going to sit on your desk, then get the iMac, otherwise get the 15" MBP.

    The 2012 version of the MBP (and iMac) have not been released but is rumored/projected to occur May or later with the release of Ivy Bridge (Intel's new chipset).
     
  5. ChristineMC thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 24, 2012
    #5
    Thank you! Yes I plan to wait for the new 2012 version to come out.
     
  6. ChristineMC thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 24, 2012
    #6
    I currently use Premeire CS5 on my PC so I'll probably use that as my editing software since I'm familiar with it. I would rather not have to transcode and add another step if at all possible. Would that be the only way to edit 1080 HD footage on a MAC? TIA
     
  7. simsaladimbamba

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    #7
    No, Premiere Pro can edit H.264 encoded video (the Canon stores its video using that codec), but it is very CPU intensive and you might not get around transcoding it.
    H.264 is NOT an editing codec, it is meant for delivery and distribution. An editing codec stores all frames of a video, H.264 does only store keyframes, and the images in between are interpolated, meaning they have to be calculated during playback, thus the high CPU usage, which also makes frame exact editing a bit difficult.
    As you said, you don't mind long rendering times, editing H.264 footage will introduce long rendering times, if you apply several effects or export the finished video.

    But as I have a video editing background, I just don't like to edit highly compressed footage, thus I rather take the time to let the computer transcode it properly to an editing format and me having a better editing experience.


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  8. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

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    Jan 20, 2010
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    Terra
    #8
    My PowerBook G4 can do this as well, and it's far older and slower than either of those Macs. Exporting was a PAIN, though.

    Transcoding to an intermediate codec is the best way to go because, unless you're using a really high-end HD camera (in which case you wouldn't be asking this question), the video you're getting from the camera is highly compressed. While Premiere will accept and work with AVCHD (I'm assuming this is what you'll use) in its native format, it will work MUCH faster with the video transcoded to an intermediate codec. Additionally, you'll be able to layer far more effects and audio layers and still play back in realtime when editing than if you never transcoded to begin with.

    You don't HAVE to, but you really should. If all you're doing is a single video and audio track with a color correction filter, don't bother. But, I imagine you're not considering purchasing a MBP just for something as simple as that.

    Trust me, intermediate codecs make the life of a video editor MUCH easier.

    EDIT: Sim and I posted at the same time, his points are quite good. If you're worried about the extra time it takes to transcode to an intermediate codec, let it go overnight. You'll be sleeping anyway, presumably.
     
  9. Paul2k12 macrumors newbie

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    Nov 3, 2011
    #9
    What codec would people recommend transcoding AVCHD to a format suited to CS5?

    Paul
     
  10. simsaladimbamba

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    #10
    Since Premiere Pro does not come with its own codecs, I would use the Apple Intermediate Codec, as it is already included with your Mac. ProRes would be the better alternative though, but it only comes with Final Cut Pro.
    Maybe ask Kevin Monahan.
     
  11. aaron580 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    #11
    Id go with a 15 or a 17" MBP just because if you want to take it somewhere you can. Heck Id even sell you mine LOL
     
  12. ChristineMC thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 24, 2012
    #12
    Great! The transcoding does make perfect sense. Oh would I also be able to play the .mov on the Mac without choppiness. On my current PC they play very choppy sooc although the videos are completely smooth watching them on TV or in camera.
     
  13. simsaladimbamba

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    #13
    Yes, they will play smooth. Can you watch 1080p trailers from http://trailers.apple.com on your Windows computer?
     

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