Macbook Pro Retina - Very Cold Temperatures

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Akytarus, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Akytarus, Feb 6, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013

    Akytarus macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    #1
    Good to know that the MacBook Pro Retina 15" can run in very cold temperatures...

    All temperatures is fahrenheit...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. el-John-o macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Location:
    Missouri
    #2
    Pretty neat!

    Generally, components like the cold. Nothing particularly 'special' about the MBP. You'll note that big over-clocking teams use extreme measures (like liquid nitrogen!) to cool CPU's to sub-zero temperatures to hid ridiculous clock speeds (7GHz+). After of course sealing components to prevent condensation damage.

    You may already know this, but if not just a heads in case. Bringing a machine that cold into a warm environment (like your heated home or car) will cause very rapid condensation. Water will form on the components of your machine when it's cold (like a sweating soda cup). I would shut it down before bringing it inside and let it sit for a while and warm up before using it. Shut off, the condensation it'll get isn't likely to hurt anything. But if it's running the condensation could really wipe stuff out.
     
  3. davidjearly macrumors 68020

    davidjearly

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
  4. Akytarus thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    #4
    I guess its a matter of opinion... I kinda got use to it... :D



    ----------

    I am aware of the dangers of condensation... I'm alway careful to wait till my laptop climatizes before turning it back on... Being in northern canada it can be very cold...

     
  5. Sondrix macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2011
    #5
    WOW that is a neat monitoring tool, what is it? Also are you sure it's not celsius ...
     
  6. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #6
    If this is in Farenheit, your temperature sensors are broken. Actually, they are most likely broken even if its Celsius ^^ Are you keeping the laptop outside in the frost?
     
  7. Akytarus, Feb 8, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013

    Akytarus thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    #7
    I'm using iStats from http://bjango.com/mac/istatmenus/



    ----------

    Laptop was out in 3'F temperature in my research vehicle all day (Northern Canada). Had to quickly look something up. Laptop would not boot up on battery's had to use a charge pack to get it to boot up.

    P.S. Its in the warmth now of the research building. Probable wont let it get that cold again - probably not good for the battery

     
  8. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #8
    Ah, so it was shortly/immediately after startup? Then I can believe these numbers ;)
     
  9. el-John-o macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Location:
    Missouri
    #9
    That cold won't hurt the batteries. However, when batteries are cold, the amount of charge they can use is less. Some people say that it discharges batteries, that's not true. But the electrons move much slower so you cannot use some of the charge until it warms up. You'd actually be able to watch the battery life increase as the laptop warms up.
     
  10. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #10
    Can you explain then why my motorbike's battery charge drops to zero in January for the third year straight?
     
  11. yusukeaoki macrumors 68030

    yusukeaoki

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    #11
    To be honest, you dont want to get your batteries too hot or too cold.
    Apple recommends keeping your unit between 32~95F.
     
  12. el-John-o macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Location:
    Missouri
    #12
    That's a lead acid or acid glas-mat battery, not a LiPo battery like in a MacBook Pro. Totally different things.

    Actually, maintenance is the complete opposite between the two. With an SLA or AGM battery, you want it to ALWAYS be fully charged. If the battery drops below 12.4 volts, then sulphate crystals (from the sulphuric acid inside the battery) begin to form on the soft lead plates, impeding the batteries ability for electrons to flow. However, LIKE a LiPo battery, voltage will drop as the battery gets cold. That's because electrons move slower in the cold! That's why a battery tender is so important in the winter for vehicles that you don't drive at least every few days. As those sulphate crystals form, the battery will become useless. That's why some battery chargers will be listed as 'Desulphating', because they send short high-voltage pulses of electricity to attempt to dislodge some of the sulphate crystals from the plates.

    If it's dropping to zero, it's toast. I wouldn't ride that bike with that battery lest you find yourself stranded. If it just won't start or turn on, chances are it's actually down in the low 11 volt range. If you hit it with a voltage tester that's probably what you'd find. However, 12 volt electronics (like your lights, dash, starter, etc.) won't work with less than 12 volts. Each time your battery drops below 12.4v, sulphation begins. A battery tender (not a trickle charger, an actual tender that is automatic and will shut off around 12.6 volts) is an excellent investment. I have one for all of my bikes. But I have no problem leaving them out in the cold, in fact, for lead-acid batteries, the cold is good for them. Just as long as the voltage doesn't dip!

    The biggest concern with LiPo batteries (like in the MBP/MBA) is condensation. That's why Apple recommends a temperature range (though extreme heat can definitely kill it, or even cause it to catch fire or explode). Prolonged extreme cold could damage the battery, but once in a while being left in a car shouldn't hurt anything.

    The biggest reason for Apples temperature recommendation (on the LOW end) is performance. The HIGH end (above 95F) can cause damage, but the LOW end, will just cause a really short battery life, or no charge at all. LiPo batteries are a chemical reaction, chemical reactions slow as it gets cold. I'm not at all surprised that the machine wouldn't power on at 4F (well below freezing) as the reaction had STOPPED completely. But, it actually hadn't lost any charge, the charge just couldn't 'move'. It's the same reason Apple recommends occasionally cycling the batteries (though it's not nearly as crucial on a LiPo), the reaction needs to happen and the electrons need to flow!
     
  13. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #13
    Thanks, el-John-o, it was a very interesting read! Unfortunately, I am an absolute idiot when it comes to batteries :)
     
  14. el-John-o macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Location:
    Missouri
    #14
    Not many people are 'battery nerds' like me. Most of my information comes from flying model aircraft. Most of mine are nitromethane or gasoline powered (powered by small engines), but these days everyone running electric R/C planes (and these days they are so efficient people fly enourmous giant-scale R/C planes with several-foot wingspans powered by electric motors) is using Li-Po batteries, so you learn a lot there.

    The info on the lead acid batteries just comes from riding motorcycles, and dealing with storage and batteries, and learning the different types of batteries and tenders and trying to find out how make them last the longest. I don't like having to buy new batteries for my bikes!
     
  15. dma550 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2009
    Location:
    CT
    #15
    At that temp I would be afraid of all your liquid crystals freezing! :D
     
  16. robvas macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #16
    Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
    Storage temperature: –13° to 113° F (–24° to 45° C)

    You shouldn't use it at that low of temps.
     
  17. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #17
    This post made me laugh :) I came for the discussion on operating temperatures, and shortly after find a remark on browser skin aesthetics. Delightfully unexpected!
     

Share This Page