Macbook Pro set up

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jerrykannam, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. jerrykannam macrumors newbie

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    Aug 11, 2013
    #1
    Currently I have the mid 2012 15 in non retina display macbook pro 2.6Ghz 750gb HDD 8gb ram. I'm running OSX 10.8.4. I was thinking about upgrading and getting a SDD. I was wondering if i should set it up as a fusion drive with both the HDD and SDD or set it up as a hybrid drive and just have the SDD as my main hard drive and have the HDD as extra storage. I use windows with bootcamp so i'm wondering which set up it will work with. Any input would be appreciated.
     
  2. Phan0121 macrumors newbie

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    Mar 26, 2013
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    Minnesota
  3. jerrykannam thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 11, 2013
    #3
    Well I don't have one yet. I was thinking either 225 or 450GB.
     
  4. Phan0121 macrumors newbie

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    Mar 26, 2013
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    Minnesota
  5. jerrykannam thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #5
    ok so not fusion?
     
  6. yusukeaoki macrumors 68030

    yusukeaoki

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    Tokyo, Japan
  7. Quadra700 macrumors newbie

    Quadra700

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    Jul 9, 2013
    #7
    Hi,

    I`ve adopted Fusion on both my macbook pro 2007 and 2008. I use a apple 128gb ssd + 1TB on one and a 256GB SSD + 1TB on the second and it works very well.

    It`s all about what your workload is like but for most of us this serves as a very good solution to performance / capacity. No it`s not really RAID-0 but it`s a little like it in regards to requiring both drives up to operate, its a virtualised pool of storage that prioritises all writes to the ssd and then in turn to the sata hd, what you will find is that when you go above the ssd capacity things get a little slower but still quicker than with just a standard HD. It`s also imperative to ensure you have a backup, if you loose either drive you loose the pool so backups are critical.

    I like the solution and apple corestorage is a neat concept on virtualised storage.

    Cheers,
     
  8. Phan0121 macrumors newbie

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    Mar 26, 2013
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    Minnesota
    #8
    From my understanding of Apple's Fusion drive. It basically turns two drives into one big drive (SSD + HD). Essentially this is similar to Seagate's Hybrid drives.

    Someone keep me honest but I think that usually means that the computer will prioritize programs that you use often onto the SSD and keep the other stuff on the HD.

    In my mind, if I'm going to be using Bootcamp fairly often. Then it would be a good idea to just partition my SSD, so I could make sure my OS's are on the SSD.
     
  9. Quadra700 macrumors newbie

    Quadra700

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    Jul 9, 2013
    #9
    Depends how you want to play it but yes you are correct in that it has intelligence and will move blocks about depending on how frequently they are used or performing. I`ve since moved all my macbook pro`s over to it as a solution, i don`t need the superdrives so filling the bay up with the stock drive and replacing the main bay with an SSD / turning fusion on does me well :) Can i just quote that it is NOT like the hybrid setup, this is actually smarter and better performing that a hybrid, it`s a little more intelligent, a hybrid is just a buffer / cache :)

    Cheers,
     
  10. jerrykannam thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 11, 2013
    #10
    Well i'm doing this upgrade on a video i saw. They actually put in 2 450GB ssds and set them up as raids. Heres the video if needed. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRUeW7pVELs
    For financial reasons im only going to have one SSD. Is raid setting it up as a fusion system? Since i use windows for school programming i always want to to stay on the ssd and not be moved.
     
  11. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

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    Apr 25, 2012
    #11
    RAID is not Fusion.

    Fusion uses the SSD for all your frequently used files and pushes the rest to the spinning drive, improving response time.

    RAID takes multiple disks of the same size (and ideally exactly the same specs-wise, including the brand) and uses them together, either spanning the data across both drives for speed or mirroring one to the other for redundancy/backup.

    This is, of course, a high-level description, more can be found online.
     
  12. jerrykannam thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 11, 2013
    #12
    So what would be the ideal set up for me?
     
  13. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

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    Apr 25, 2012
    #13
    That depends on the risks you're willing to accept. Read up on your options (I know there's nots of RAID info online, there must be similar for Fusion by now) and make that decision.
     
  14. pppppenguin macrumors newbie

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    Nov 3, 2009
    #14
    fusion doesn't seem applicable in your case and with the dwindling costs of ssd's now I would go ssd main and mech drive as a standalone storage. Just remember to make regular backups of both :)
     
  15. jerrykannam thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 11, 2013
    #15
    Alright thanks for the input
     

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