Macbook Pro Superdrive is loud!!!

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by psychotropic, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. psychotropic macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Location:
    Florida
    #1
    When I burn a cd using my Macbook Pro it sounds like an airplane taking off, does anyone else's Pro do the same thing? If so is there anything I can do to fix this problem? It also does it when I watch a dvd, its rather annoying.

    Thanks,
     
  2. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #2
    The disc spinning makes that sound, there is nothing you can do about it.
     
  3. cshen macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
  4. linuxophile macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    here
    #4
    Hi there,

    it is difficult to know exactly which sounds it makes: however I noticed that (on my imac) some dvd/cd's make a "rattling" sound which someone may describe as a propeller engine. My interpretation of the erratic phenomenon is that the media is (sometimes) slightly unbalanced and/or warped.
    Some level of noise is functionally unavoidable: but if you think it is not normal and it makes the noise for all dvd/cd's then it could possibly be a misaligned loading mechanism.

    Of course it is impossible for me to tell from a verbal description: bring it to a repair shop and ask them.
     
  5. lordthistle macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Location:
    Italy
  6. SnowLeopard2008 macrumors 604

    SnowLeopard2008

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #6
    The slot load drives make noise by nature. The loading mechanism and all. If it sounds VERY loud, test out the noise levels by checking a nearby Apple Store MBP.
     
  7. THX1139 macrumors 68000

    THX1139

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #7
    I see the OPs point. I was trying to watch a DVD on my Macpro the other day and it was so loud when seeking that it was annoying. I wound up watching it on my DVD player and that is virtually silent. Wonder why the difference?
     

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