MacBook Pro using Solidworks CaD

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by guideme, Aug 11, 2014.

  1. guideme macrumors newbie

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    #1
    Hello hi forum members,

    I am new to the forum as you can see and have some or more questions and answers i am seeking in order to make the right choice of purchase in the hardware of the macbook pro laptop 15 inch.

    firstly i am a windows user and never really liked/used to apple/ios and to be honest i dont like iphone (apologies to anyone on here reading this) and since windows has been constantly disappointing me from time to time i thought why not try out the macbook pro.

    I will be using this mainly to run solidworks CaD at university for an upcoming project as well as home to practise. Now i know very well after some research and speaking to the customer service mac book pro comes with bootcamp pre installed which i can use to run windows if not then use software such as parrallels to run both operating systems at the same time. looking at the requirements for Cad the laptop meets the criteria, however i want to know from you guys if this a wise option to go for not just to use CaD but for also further along the lines especially since it cannot be upgraded and spending quite a bit on this.

    i can certainly see some members suggesting to go for windows and purchase a workstation tower and build from scratch which will be very beneficial, however since i am always on the move i want something which i am able to just freely use and practise where/whenever i want to. I have looked the workstations such as;
    the dell m3800 and
    m4800 (http://configure.euro.dell.com/dell...-m4800-workstation&c=uk&l=en&s=bsd&cs=ukbsdt1)

    but as mentioned even though dell is a workstation suited for Solidworks, the only problem is viruses and windows causing issues as well as dell which i have read is not good at times (its customer service and hardware) not to forget how heavy the actual deal will be compared to a macbook pro.

    all i want is you're honest advice and recommendations for something that will be worth while for the money spent and last longer for years to come until i consider a new hardware.

    thank you very much for taking you're time to read this and also comment on it.

    thanks
     
  2. leman macrumors 604

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    Oct 14, 2008
    #2
    If Solidworks is the only reason why you need a computer, you will be better of with a Windows-based laptop. You will have higher performance for less money. A Macbook Pro is a very good all-round mobile workstation, but it just becomes an overpriced machine if you can't utilise its strong points.
     
  3. guideme thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3

    i dont mind paying the price especially since it offering me 15% student discount which bring its down to £1700 (still very pricey) but looking at windows laptop is roughly around that price if not more too.

    what would you say the strong points for Macbook pro is?
     
  4. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    #4
    I currently am a Solidworks user on the 15" rMBP.

    Bootcamp would be the best option for the full potential of solidworks. But Im going to be honest, but I hate having to restart 20 times a day to keep switching between OS. Parallels was my alternative. Its much better having both OSs up at once. It performs well. And I believe the hardware of the rMBP will last you a good 4-5 years.

    Though do note! The main complaint I have about solidoworks on a mac is that there is not native "delete" button on the keyboard. So you will need to make another key function as the delete.
     
  5. guideme thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #5
    i see exactly what you mean pal. if i do purchase it, i will use a mouse where possible when using solidworks which i could just use to delete. so you reckon with the new mac book pro retina it is a great investment over any windows laptop yes.

    also is bootcamp and parrallels free or does it need to be purchased too
     
  6. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    #6
    Oh dont get me wrong, you'd still NEED that mouse, otherwise rotating and zooming are VERY difficult. But yeah right clicking and deleting is definitely an option also. Its just my preference having that keyboard button.

    I personally would say yes, but that is because I grew to hate windows. Though when I first started with Macs, I bought a mac mini because it was the cheapest computer and I didnt know if I would like OSX. It turns out I LOVED OSX. Gave my self built tower to my mom to keep, and got the 15" rMBP last year.

    I would recommend visiting an apple store and playing around with it first for a bit. See the features and functions within the settings app. Because honestly it was my love of iOS that got me into OSX, but since you dont like the iPhone, I am hesitant to tell you to go out and buy one of Apple's most expensive computers out there. But if you are really wanting to get away with windows, there arent many alternatives.

    I dont at all regret my decision, I just wish there was a 13" version with the kick of a 15". And depending on your usage of solidworks, it is more compatible than you may think. Granted, I dont do very large models like the ones I do for work. But at home, the personal models I make for my home design arent very demanding. I was actually considering buying a surface pro 3 for my solidworks usage. And if it were cheaper, I would definitely have bought it just to test out.
     
  7. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #7
    I used my 15" rMBP under Bootcamp for Solidworks. Even works for RealView. Works great, battery life gives me about 3.5 hours which isn't horrible considering what was running.
     
  8. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    #8
    Bootcamp comes with your Mac.
    It's only purpose is to prepare a partition on the hard drive, ready to boot to some version of Windows that you choose to install on that prepared partition.
    Bootcamp (the utility) is a free utility provided by Apple.
    You would need a commercial install of Windows, which you will need to purchase.
    That would give you a second operating system on your Mac. It requires you to restart every time that you want to switch to the other operating system.

    You CAN also use software, such as Parallels, or VMWare, that provide a way to run another operating system (could be Windows, could be a large list of other operating systems that you can use) in a virtual environment, so using OS X as the host for running Windows. The BIG advantage is - Windows (for example) runs as an OS X application, so you can do a lot of "windows" things, without needing to restart just to do that. You just run the Parallels app, and there you are, running Windows, at the same time! And, you can run other OS X apps, all at the same time as you use Windows. A Boot Camp system won't let you do THAT…
    And - bottom line - you have to purchase Windows, and you also have to purchase the virtualization software (Parallels/VMWare) (there's also VirtualBox, which is free, open-source software. It may have some compatibility issues, or just not be a good fit for your needs)
     
  9. TSE macrumors 68030

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    #9
    I run Solidworks 2013 and Keyshot regularly on my 2011 MacBook Pro with Parallels and have no complaints, save for the amount of RAM being used, but I'm upgrading to 16gb which should be more than enough for this year.

    Really, I find Parallels the best way to do it. Loading up Boot Camp is just so frustrating especially when my Adobe Suite is on OS X.
     
  10. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    #10
    Any windows based alternative is going to cost you just as much as a rMBP. Please. With it being able to run Windows natively out of the box, it makes it no more overpriced than any other windows laptop that is just thin, light, and powerful that costs just as much. [cough] XPS 15, Razor Blade [/cough]
     
  11. TSE macrumors 68030

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    #11
    Save for that Apple Boot Camp drivers for Windows are notoriously subpar compared to real PCs.
     
  12. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    #12
    But the form factor isnt a necessity. The OP never mentioned needing anything that thin. Mainly portability. And if laptops 10 years ago were portable, there can be no real complaints about any of today's laptops not being portable. There are many laptops that are both portable and able to run solidworks for around $1000. OP, I would recommend looking into some lenovo thinkpads if you are interested in going the windows route.
     
  13. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    #13
    He's going to a University, I'd imagine form factor being important, but ultimate its up to the OP. If we used your logic, laptops would still be 2" thick. This is also seriously the same PCs are cheaper than Mac argument. In general, I could get a $500-700 PC that's "portable" and runs programs as well as a $1000 Mac. Why get a Mac(or any high end PC like an XPS 15 for that matter) at all using your logic?
     
  14. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    #14
    Because the mac in question is about $2000... almost double the price and can perform well. Using my logic, just because there are lighter laptops around doesnt automatically classify the older ones as heavy. I had no problems carrying my 17" Asus G73 gaming laptop around school, a $1000 purchase about 2 years ago... If I hadnt sold it, it would still be able to do everything the OP would need.

    You are not being objective here. As a college student money is a serious issue and for that all laptops must be considered. And if he/she can get one that fits their needs and have an extra $1000 in their pockets, why consider something else?

    Your first post pretty much says that the OP has no other choice in laptops, which is quite false. I understand we are in a Apple forum, and I love and own macs, but allow the user to make an informed decision. Dont just say that any other laptop that can do what he wants will be the same price as a mac. You must know that isnt true.
     
  15. TechZeke, Aug 11, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2014

    TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    #15
    Just because 2.5" thick and 8 pound laptops came out, doesn't mean the behemoths from 1995 were heavy. We could do this all day.

    If money was so tight he wouldn't even be considering a 15" rMBP. The OP said himself "all I want is you're honest advice and recommendations for something that will be worth while for the money spent and last longer for years to come until I consider a new hardware."

    Last time I checked, worth while for the money =/= cheap.

    Where in my post did say he had no other options? You must be joking. He was looking a 15" rMBP, I stated that any PC that's in anyway shape form like a rMBP will cost just as much.

    I was also mainly refuting leman's claim about the 15" rMBP being overpriced for what he wants to do, and this simply false. Again, we could play the overpriced card in general. I never stated I had a problem recommending PC laptops.

    EDIT: Rereading my post, I think I see where you misunderstood what I was saying.

    I said:
    Any windows based alternative is going to cost you just as much as a rMBP

    I should have been more specific, I meant PCs like the rMBP, which is why I stated my examples at the end (XPS 15 and Razor Blade). I see where the miscommunication is now.
     
  16. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    #16
    Exactly, so you agree? If you could carry them then, you can carry them now. Your physical strength doesnt diminish when a lighter computer is available.

    True, but who is one to complain about saving money. And just because you arent spending $10000, doesnt mean your buying crap. A quality PC could easily be bought at $1500.


    Well Im glad you see that, but why assume the OP only wants computers like the rMBP? I dont think the retina is overpriced, it is great quality and OSX is well worth it. But because the OP is willing to look at windows alternatives, we cant exclude the ones that will still meet the functional requirements of their needs. As I stated in my post of my usage of solidworks, not much is required to run it, but that will depend on what they are running. If the first gen surface pro's can run SW, then many many other laptops will be able to handle it.
     
  17. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    #17
    I'm tired of discussing this so this will be last post.

    That isn't the point. Like I said it's ultimately up to OP. Again, if we used that argument for everything, we would still have 2.5" laptops.



    Again, I never said there was anything wrong with suggesting cheaper PC laptops, but I was basing what I said off the fact that he's looking at a rMBP. My main point was at leman's post. There really isn't anything else to be said on this topic.




    See above.
     
  18. leman macrumors 604

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    #18
    In my opinion: excellent mobility (weight form factor) with no sacrifices on performance, great battery life, one of the best keyboards and the best trackpad in the industry, fast connectivity (3x3 WiFi, TB2 etc.). And of course, on the software side — a very functional OS, Unix, system-wide scriptability etc.


    I think you misunderstood me. I said: MBP is overpriced if you don't utilise its strong points. Suppose that someone does not need that much mobility (the computer is moved only rarely), uses an external mouse, almost never runs on on battery power, and does not care for a HiDPI screen (because they work with CAD, not with text or image design). Then, they are not using many of the functions which actually make the MBP (or comparable) laptops expensive. For such a person, a $1200 gaming laptop can be a better choice, because it delivers as much (or better) performance for less money. Of course, the gaming laptop won't have the screen, mobility, battery, connectivity etc., but they only matter if they are actually needed.

    On the other hand, it should be clear to anyone by now, that all other laptops comparable in configuration to the MBP cost more or less the same.
     
  19. guideme thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #19
    Thank you all the forum members

    After careful consideration and thought as well as the replies received from you guys I shall going forward with the purchase at the end of August for the MBP 15 inch new model and will also consider the options to use parallel for both windows and ios also.
    Just one more question should I upgrade the processor to 2.8 instead of 2.5ghz (additional £150 + if I am correct but is it needed if I stay with 512 ssd because 1t ssd is additional £££££££) ??? Would it make much difference and do you guys think it is necessary and needed or just stay with the standard 2.5ghz with 512 ssd???


    Overall I'd like to say a big thank you to guys and this means a lot to me, just disappointed I didn't come here before to get advice but at least now I where to go.

    Thanks again

    ----------


    Thanks pal, for the advice and information needed for to make sure I acquired the right reasons to opt into purchasing the laptop and will definitely get back to you once it is purchased. In regards to the windows tablet you spoke about, it's very handy and also very interesting piece of hardware too
     
  20. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    #20
    Honestly I don't think the 0.3GHz will make too much of a difference. I probably would go for the 2.5GHz.
     
  21. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #21
    I agree with you, the 0.3GHz difference is unnoticeable.

    The stock high-end 2.5/16/512/750M would suffice.
     
  22. guideme thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #22
    It's decided then the rMBP 15 inch will be ordered at the end of the month through the Apple site, I was considering bidding on eBay and maybe get it little cheaper but I feel uncomfortable since most are from the US and would need to purchase warranty again.
     
  23. austinpike macrumors 6502

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    MN
    #23
    I wouldn't necessarily discount the 2.8 so quickly... In the US it's a $200 bump on a $2500 machine which seems pretty reasonable to have the absolute fastest. Granted it is only a 10% bump in speed but if you do any rendering it will use every last .1ghz (across 4 processors...) I'm sure there are solidworks tools that will squeeze every ounce out of the single thread operations.

    No you won't "notice" it on a daily basis but there is something about that 4.0ghz turbo that sounds really nice....
     
  24. guideme thread starter macrumors newbie

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    UK
    #24
    Coming Soon!!!!!!!!!!!

    Hey Guys,

    I ordered my rMBP and it is coming soon.

    I just want some advice, in terms of what is the best accessories and protection for the laptop because i want to keep it in pristine condition and also how do i install windows 7 (which is going to be used for Solidworks CaD, since i have heard windows 8 or higher is not the best for using it. Also is there much difference with the microsoft word for mac and windows ? i am open for the best software's to help in me with university which i load easily.

    please let me know guys

    thanks
     
  25. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #25
    Microsoft Office for Mac is a complete joke.

    To install Windows 7 or later on your retina MBP, you will need an ISO image of a 64-bit version of Windows. After obtaining the appropriate ISO image, open up Boot Camp Assistant and follow the instructions.

    Boot Camp Assistant will image an empty USB stick for you with the ISO, as well putting Boot Camp drivers in it.
     

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