MacBook pro with Retina, boot camp

XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
I'm definitely getting the MBP Retina. Question about the SDXC, though. Can I get a 64GB card and make that my boot camp partition for Windows 7? I just want to do it for gaming only. And I'd install things onto that card if it works like that... Does it?

Thanks in advance.
 

Wingsuit

macrumors newbie
May 29, 2012
13
0
I'm definitely getting the MBP Retina. Question about the SDXC, though. Can I get a 64GB card and make that my boot camp partition for Windows 7? I just want to do it for gaming only. And I'd install things onto that card if it works like that... Does it?

Thanks in advance.
Those cards are not designed to house an operating system and the constant read/writes wear down the drive significantly faster than conventional storage...
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
What about a USB stick? Same thing? Class 10 SD cards, maybe?

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Those cards are not designed to house an operating system and the constant read/writes wear down the drive significantly faster than conventional storage...
Well... What exactly is "significantly faster"? Wears out in 10 years instead of 20? Wears out in 5 years instead of 10?

I want the pro with retina, but I can only realistically afford a the $2199 model. And they don't have a stupid option for more SSD capacity! What to do, what to do?
 
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ladeer

macrumors 6502
Feb 15, 2007
391
10
gaming off SD card that runs Windows 7? Are you serious? Not only it's a terrible idea, I am sure you cannot do it. Have you used Boot Camp before? you have to go to "Drive" and partition your HD first. It won't even let you choose your SD card as Boot Camp partition
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
gaming off SD card that runs Windows 7? Are you serious? Not only it's a terrible idea, I am sure you cannot do it. Have you used Boot Camp before? you have to go to "Drive" and partition your HD first. It won't even let you choose your SD card as Boot Camp partition
Darn. Yeah, I've used Boot Camp... just didn't think about the limitations. I'm trying to figure out creative ways to get around the 256GB SSD. It's too low for me.
 
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ladeer

macrumors 6502
Feb 15, 2007
391
10
Darn. Yeah, I've used Boot Camp... just didn't think about the limitations. I'm trying to figure out creative ways to get around the 256GB SSD. It's too low for me.
i have been using 256gb w/ boot camp and the trick is to actively get rid of junks. you will be surprised by how much space you can get out of.

unless you have a lot of video/photo/mp3, i really don't think you will run out of space. and if you do have a lot of those files, you can always store them in an external hard drive, and only access the ones that you need for the time being (editing files). the 3.5 inch external hard drive does not require separate power source. i have one of those w/ a 128gb ssd in it (the original one that came w/ my MBP but I had to upgrade it to 256gb cuz 128gb was just not enough)
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
i have been using 256gb w/ boot camp and the trick is to actively get rid of junks. you will be surprised by how much space you can get out of.

unless you have a lot of video/photo/mp3, i really don't think you will run out of space. and if you do have a lot of those files, you can always store them in an external hard drive, and only access the ones that you need for the time being (editing files). the 3.5 inch external hard drive does not require separate power source. i have one of those w/ a 128gb ssd in it (the original one that came w/ my MBP but I had to upgrade it to 256gb cuz 128gb was just not enough)
Hrmm... I'm currently on a 250 HDD on my MBP 4,1 (early 2008). I guess I can live w/ a similar hard drive... although I like to hoard all my digital files. I guess I can move those to an external attached to the new Airport Express Base station!

I want to live the wireless lifestyle... wireless N will do a good enough job of transferring big files, right? And if I wanted to wirelessly access movies from my external HDD attached to the router, is it decent enough do to? And time machine backups? With a USB splitter, is it possible to attach two hard drives to the router? Would the bottleneck then be the USB 2.0 connection?
 
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nwc

macrumors newbie
Jun 11, 2012
2
0
What about a USB stick? Same thing? Class 10 SD cards, maybe?

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Well... What exactly is "significantly faster"? Wears out in 10 years instead of 20? Wears out in 5 years instead of 10?

I want the pro with retina, but I can only realistically afford a the $2199 model. And they don't have a stupid option for more SSD capacity! What to do, what to do?
Perhaps this will help shed more light on things.
From Wikipedia:

"Another limitation is that flash memory has a finite number of program-erase cycles (typically written as P/E cycles). Most commercially available flash products are guaranteed to withstand around 100,000 P/E cycles, before the wear begins to deteriorate the integrity of the storage...This effect is partially offset in some chip firmware or file system drivers...this technique is called wear leveling...For portable consumer devices, these wearout management techniques typically extend the life of the flash memory beyond the life of the device itself, and some data loss may be acceptable in these applications. For high reliability data storage, however, it is not advisable to use flash memory that would have to go through a large number of programming cycles. This limitation is meaningless for 'read-only' applications such as thin clients and routers, which are programmed only once or at most a few times during their lifetimes."
 
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eron

macrumors 6502
Dec 2, 2008
394
0
I'll be more worried about how Windows 7 display that Retina's resolution.
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
Perhaps this will help shed more light on things.
From Wikipedia:

"Another limitation is that flash memory has a finite number of program-erase cycles (typically written as P/E cycles). Most commercially available flash products are guaranteed to withstand around 100,000 P/E cycles, before the wear begins to deteriorate the integrity of the storage...This effect is partially offset in some chip firmware or file system drivers...this technique is called wear leveling...For portable consumer devices, these wearout management techniques typically extend the life of the flash memory beyond the life of the device itself, and some data loss may be acceptable in these applications. For high reliability data storage, however, it is not advisable to use flash memory that would have to go through a large number of programming cycles. This limitation is meaningless for 'read-only' applications such as thin clients and routers, which are programmed only once or at most a few times during their lifetimes."
Does that bring up the worry about the SSD in the MBP w/ Retina dying before the machine is ready to be replaced (maybe ~3 years)? AppleCare could take care of that, eh?
 
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nwc

macrumors newbie
Jun 11, 2012
2
0
Does that bring up the worry about the SSD in the MBP w/ Retina dying before the machine is ready to be replaced (maybe ~3 years)? AppleCare could take care of that, eh?
If that happened, I think AppleCare would definitely take care of it during the coverage period. But they wouldn't be able to assist with any data loss as a result of SSD failure, so the important thing is to back up with time machine.

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Does that bring up the worry about the SSD in the MBP w/ Retina dying before the machine is ready to be replaced (maybe ~3 years)? AppleCare could take care of that, eh?
BTW, I purchased the retina model yesterday as soon as it became available. I am considering using an SD card to host virtual machines. I've never tried that before, so it will be interesting to see how well it works.

Does anyone here have experience with VMs on SD cards?
 
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jsing100

macrumors newbie
Mar 31, 2012
7
2
Can you bootcamp from an external HD?

256 is very limiting if you're talking about running OSX and Windows 7. I'm actually mobile with my laptop and would prefer not to have to carry a bunch of stuff. Maybe some people enjoy micro-managing their HD space but a step down to 256 would hurt. If I go Retina it'll have to be 512.
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
If that happened, I think AppleCare would definitely take care of it during the coverage period. But they wouldn't be able to assist with any data loss as a result of SSD failure, so the important thing is to back up with time machine.

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BTW, I purchased the retina model yesterday as soon as it became available. I am considering using an SD card to host virtual machines. I've never tried that before, so it will be interesting to see how well it works.

Does anyone here have experience with VMs on SD cards?
I'm now debating on whether to go regular MBP or Retina MBP... :-/

I'll mainly use it for watching cat videos on YouTube and gaming. :-D

(and other forms of entertainment)....(and I'm a digital hoarder)...

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Can you bootcamp from an external HD?

256 is very limiting if you're talking about running OSX and Windows 7. I'm actually mobile with my laptop and would prefer not to have to carry a bunch of stuff. Maybe some people enjoy micro-managing their HD space but a step down to 256 would hurt. If I go Retina it'll have to be 512.
I wish I could get $2,799 for my kidney that I'm going to sell. Sadly, it's only worth about $42.
 
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Panini

macrumors regular
Jun 12, 2012
204
0
Palo Alto, CA
Why don't you just put the partition on your main SSD and put all those files that WOULD be on your SSD onto the 64GB card (such as videos, pictures, documents, etc.)
 
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Rudy69

macrumors 6502a
Mar 30, 2009
641
687
I remember running Windows XP on an SD card on an old Netbook, now the question is can the MBP boot of an sd (I would guess yes)
 
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Faux Carnival

macrumors 6502a
Aug 1, 2010
697
2
256GB is more than enough. Make sure you leave Windows 7 at least 50GB. Especially if you are planning on gaming.

I reserved 20GB for Windows 7 in my Macbook Air and I'm out of space. I can't even install Office or Photoshop. Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1 occupies almost all of the 20GB.

And, one more thing. SSD's are not for storage. Get a blazing fast 1TB USB 3.0 external. They are cheap as hell. And store everything there. (Movies, programs, tv shows, games) Just have program files in your Mac OS partition.
 
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TheMacBookPro

macrumors 68020
May 9, 2008
2,132
1
I reserved 20GB for Windows 7 in my Macbook Air and I'm out of space. I can't even install Office or Photoshop. Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1 occupies almost all of the 20GB.
Disable the hiberfile. You'll regain either 2 or 4GB depending on the amount of RAM you have installed and there's no functional loss, as long as you don't plan on hibernating or using the computer till 0%.
 
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mikepro

macrumors 6502
Sep 3, 2010
424
17
And, one more thing. SSD's are not for storage. Get a blazing fast 1TB USB 3.0 external. They are cheap as hell. And store everything there. (Movies, programs, tv shows, games) Just have program files in your Mac OS partition.
Ridiculous. That's exactly what they are for. Just use it, and don't worry about it at all.
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
256GB is more than enough. Make sure you leave Windows 7 at least 50GB. Especially if you are planning on gaming.

I reserved 20GB for Windows 7 in my Macbook Air and I'm out of space. I can't even install Office or Photoshop. Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1 occupies almost all of the 20GB.

And, one more thing. SSD's are not for storage. Get a blazing fast 1TB USB 3.0 external. They are cheap as hell. And store everything there. (Movies, programs, tv shows, games) Just have program files in your Mac OS partition.
Thanks for the advice!

I'll probably end up getting a new external with the RMBP for Time Machine - which is the equivalent of backing up all my important files, right? Or would I have to worry about it deleting the file once I run out of space? Perhaps I should do Carbonite instead?
 
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XFactorer

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 2, 2007
171
18
Eugene
Disable the hiberfile. You'll regain either 2 or 4GB depending on the amount of RAM you have installed and there's no functional loss, as long as you don't plan on hibernating or using the computer till 0%.
Oh, I plan on touching my computer at least once a day. It will get no hibernation!

On a separate note, you think I should hold off on buying an OEM copy of Windows until 8 comes out?
 
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TheMacBookPro

macrumors 68020
May 9, 2008
2,132
1
Oh, I plan on touching my computer at least once a day. It will get no hibernation!

On a separate note, you think I should hold off on buying an OEM copy of Windows until 8 comes out?
Slight warning: disabling the hiberfile means the computer will lose everything running as soon as it runs out of juice since the computer can't hibernate. If you plan on working on battery in Windows without the hiberfile make sure you constantly save.

Not sure about W8. There might be compatibility issues with some applications or games when it first comes out.
 
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ladeer

macrumors 6502
Feb 15, 2007
391
10
Hrmm... I'm currently on a 250 HDD on my MBP 4,1 (early 2008). I guess I can live w/ a similar hard drive... although I like to hoard all my digital files. I guess I can move those to an external attached to the new Airport Express Base station!

I want to live the wireless lifestyle... wireless N will do a good enough job of transferring big files, right? And if I wanted to wirelessly access movies from my external HDD attached to the router, is it decent enough do to? And time machine backups? With a USB splitter, is it possible to attach two hard drives to the router? Would the bottleneck then be the USB 2.0 connection?
Just get the 27 inch external monitor and connect TB external storage in RAID format then you can access all your data at home when connected to the monitor
 
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