MacBook pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ryanqc, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. ryanqc macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    #1
    Just a quick question guys

    Was wondering if it is possible to have an a 256gb SSD as a dedicated Mac OS/Mac drive and to partition my stock 750gb in half with windows and Mac?
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Yes, it's possible. I assume you're talking about replacing your internal HDD with a SSD, then using the HDD as an external drive, shared with Windows and Mac OS X.
     
  3. ryanqc thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    #3
    Move my SSDto main slot and the HDD to optibay
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
  5. ryanqc thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    #5
    Sorry I didn't clarify earlier

    But what I wanted to do was since I'm adding an SSD to my cMBP 15" 2012 and partitioning sections for Windows and Mac, is it possible to allocate disk usage of my HDD (that will be in the optibay) for each operating system? Or is that even necessary?

    On the SSD:
    - 30-50gb for Windows
    - The rest for Apple

    HDD:
    - 250gb for Windows
    - 500gb for Mac

    Sorry for such newb questions. Just made the switch over
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #6
    Are you talking about sharing with Windows that's installed on your Mac via Boot Camp? Or sharing with a separate computer running Windows?
     
  7. ryanqc thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    #7
    Yes, with Windows on my Mac via bootcamp (in HD bay)
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    Yes, you can partition any drive, internal or external, using Disk Utility.
     
  9. ryanqc thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
  10. wethackrey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #10
    There's no issue with this setup – whether you're keeping one of the drives external or swapping out the internal optical drive. Any volume, no matter if it's a single partition on a drive or one of many partitions, can be used to boot either MacOS or Windows. You need to pay attention to what type of partition map you format the drive with. The MacOS will only boot from a GUID partition map, for example.

    Personally I use VMWare virtual machines for Windows 7 and Server 2008R2 (and other OS's like Linux and Solaris). Unless you're gaming, it's a very good solution. I ran a presentation yesterday that had Mac desktops for Powerpoint, several web browser windows open to web services on some cloud orchestration software, and two different Windows VMs doing two different things. It was very slick to just be able to swipe between them on the trackpad.
     
  11. ryanqc thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 17, 2012
    #11
    I would consider it but I'm not to sure how it will work with FL Studio. How is it running a virtual system and downloading software? I haven't quite understood how that part works
     
  12. wethackrey, Sep 9, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012

    wethackrey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #12
    It actually works very well. I have to do that all the time. You can set it up different ways, but the default setup is the VM runs on a private subnet with the Mac serving as a router. The VMs are NATed to the network the Mac is on.

    For example, at the moment, my Mac is on 172.16.100.106, on a private subnet that sits behind my router. You no doubt have a similar setup, with your WiFi router setting up a LAN on something like 192.168.1.0. VMWare then establishes a 192.168.157.0/24 network internally and each of the VMs sits in that. My primary Windows 7 VM is at 192.168.157.130.

    You don't need to understand networking to make this happen. All of this is under the covers. The software takes care of it. Just understand that the VMs get routed to your home or office LAN using NAT (network address translation) in exactly the same way your laptop uses NAT to get to the Internet. It's seamless. Any of the VMs can talk to each other on the 192.168.157.130 network and can talk to both the host Mac and any other devices on your LAN. A Windows VM can print to a printer on the LAN, for example.

    Think of it like this: Each VM is a stand-alone computer. It shares resources with its host (the Mac) and it communicates over a network to both the Mac and the outside world.
     
  13. ryanqc thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    #13
    What is the amount of storage that a virtual system is entitled to? I'm also not to sure how this will work with fl studio as well, but I'm not recording
     

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