Macbook - processor speed - HELP

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by joffibiza, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. joffibiza macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    #1
    Hi,

    i have a decision to make, and really need some help.

    i currently have own:
    -early 2011 unibody 13"
    - 2.7 GHz Intel Core i7 (Does this have a turbo boost?)
    - 16gb ram (crucial)
    - 750 GB harddrive (NON SSD)

    i really want to upgrade my 750gb normal harddrive to a 1TB SSD. I also really want to remove my cd drive, and put in for now a normal 1TB 5400rpm harddrive, then when i get some cash maybe upgrade that also to a SSD.

    I was about to do this, when i suddenly thought, that maybe i was making a mistake. The newer unibody model, has a faster processor, 2.9GHz dual core, with 3.6 GHz turbo boost.

    Is it silly to upgrade my existing laptop, taking all the time & trouble to upgrade to SSD, and be left with the slower processor speed? How much faster s the 2.9ghz, over the 2.7GHz in reality?

    I know i can get even faster with the other newer models, with retina, but i really wanted to have the second harddrive space.

    I can sell mine, but there is still a large price difference with selling and buying, or just upgrading

    How much will i notice the processor speed?

    please please help
     
  2. joffibiza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    #2

    Attached is the comparison from a website - yes it scores higher, but what is this in reality?

    Screen Shot 2015-12-29 at 01.55.10.jpg
     
  3. ifrit05 macrumors regular

    ifrit05

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2013
    Location:
    Near Detroit, MI. USA
    #3
    The speed difference between Sandy Bridge (2011) and Ivy Bridge (2012) CPU performance is about 3-6%, with about 25-68% better integrated GPU (HD Graphics 3000 vs 4000) performance. The die shrink from 32nm to 22nm also means less heat is generated and marginally better battery life.

    Honestly I'd say go with just upgrading your current machine. I have an early 2011 MBP 15" with a OWC Data Doubler with a 120GB SSD (OS) and a 750GB HDD (Data/Home folder) and it's really speedy.

    If you do get a SSD make sure you enable Trim using Terminal (El Capitan) or by using 3rd party apps (Yosemite or below using TrimEnabler, etc.). And yes, all i5 and i7's support Turbo Boost.
     
  4. joffibiza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    #4
    Ok, if that's the only cpu improvement, you are right. Gpu means nothing to me.

    I do however have another problem, I forgot to mention, my laptop has started approx 6 months ago to start freezing.

    When I am doing simple tasks, like watching movie, or even just listening to iTunes. It freezes and sound stops, and/or screen too.

    If watching a film he screen goes white, and slowly fades back in. There is none of the movie skipped, and it restarts back at the point it froze.

    When it's the sound, I just get as pinning cursor, and it frozen.


    I have monitored the computer when this happens and the cpu and ram are never under any pressure of use, sometimes very low.


    I have dropped the laptop several times, and I always assumed it was the spinning hard drive, and always assumed when I upgrade to add this will stop. I suddenly thought maybe the damage is too the cpu or similar??

    Any ideas?

    Is there a way to check this?

    How long will an upgraded laptop last, forgetting the spec which will be fine, I mean the actual motherboard etc??

    My battery is bad and needs replacing which is easy and I notice laptop gets quite hot??

    Thanks
     
  5. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #5
    Run Apple hardware test?

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201257

    Ideally they'll last 3-5 years, but if you're going to drop it, that'll shorten the life significantly.

    Use activity monitor to see what processes are using the most CPU. That should help pinpoint what is making the computer run hot.
     
  6. snaky69, Dec 29, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2015

    snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #6
    Yes, your processor has turbo boost.

    Since you never bothered mentioning what you actually do with a computer, it's impossible to say whether your usage would benefit from a faster processor at all. Keep in mind today's model and your own both have a dual core with hyper-threading, the actual raw processing power isn't all that different. Maybe, MAYBE 10%. Most people I know wouldn't even be able to choke an iPad's processor with their usage.

    As for your other post, If I were a betting man, I'd say your hard drive is near its death. It's approaching 5 years old in a laptop. Your slowdowns are freezes are consistent with that also. I hope you keep a good backup handy.
     
  7. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #7
    If you keep dropping your computer, its lifespan'll be considerably shorter. It's nearly impossible for you to damage a CPU by dropping it. It's solid-state (no moving parts). The only thing that could break near it are solder points keeping it on the board.

    You're right in thinking you hurt your hard drive in the process though.

    As far as heat, it's probably always done this, you only just now noticed it. Aluminum bodies MBP's run warm/hot to the touch all the time. Completely normal.
     
  8. joffibiza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    #8
    ok... thats good - i think

    i am totally happy with the harddrive being damaged, as i am planning to change for a 1TB samsung evo pro 850.

    I am more worried about something else failing, after i go through all that hassle.

    Apart from CPU, is there anything else that can fail, and cause me a massive repair bill later down the line, remembering that soon, the ram & harddrive will be new, and the CPU, like you said should be ok ( a re solder, should be very possible, i assume?)

    If that is the case, ill upgrade the hardrive, give it another couple years, and buy new

    I use laptop mostly for excel, word, preview, pdf editting, work, mail (6 accounts, 20000 emails) and more work stuff + music & movies. - nothing seemingly major??? although i find excel to always run slow??
     
  9. treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #9
    It sounds like you're only going to be adding the SSD for now and that can be used for other purposes when the computer dies or you decide to stop using it. Same for the HDD. You said you already have 16GB RAM. So whatever investment you make now, you'll still have usable hardware from that investment.

    Except ... you will need a bracket for the HDD/SSD if you replace the optical drive and that you won't be able to use that in a newer machine (except for the 2012 MBP non-Retina, which is still being sold). The 2011 MBP's also have a problem with getting SATA-3 speeds with the optical drive connection so keep that in mind if you decide to buy another SSD. Also, the current Retina MBP's don't allow you to add a SATA drive internally so the SSD/HDD you buy now will need an enclosure or docking station in the future.
     
  10. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #10
    Excel runs slow because it is a very shoddily written program for OS X. It has nothing to do with processor speed and everything to do with shoddy coding. My 15"'s quad core runs circles around your machine and Excel is still slow on my Mac.

    You do not need extra processing power with that kind of use.
     
  11. ifrit05 macrumors regular

    ifrit05

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2013
    Location:
    Near Detroit, MI. USA
    #11
    Just get an OWC Data Doubler and move your HDD into that and use the original HDD bay for the SSD (That's how I'm running it).

    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/DDAMBS0GB/
     
  12. treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #12
    The OP may be outside the US (sorry if I'm wrong). But if you go to whatever Amazon site is convenient and type in "Data Doubler", you should be able to find it or cheaper alternatives (check the comments). The Data Doubler can be pretty expensive outside the US.
     
  13. joffibiza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    #13
    thank you for all your help gentlemen, i have made my decision.

    I was trapped before in my mind because i really wanted to increase the harddrive space, and convert the cd drive in another SSD, so thought i needed to do this with a unibody, as the future models have no cd drive to convert.

    but i have just realised you can now get a 2tb SSD anyway, and the samsung 850 evo or pro and perfect, and can go into another unit at a later date

    so i assume with all future models i will be able to out in a 2tb SSD, maybe more??

    therefore i think ill upgrade what i have, and wait another few years and buy the best on the market then.

    thanks again

    and anyone got any extra tips for installing a samsung 850 evo i would love to hear them. mainly with the cloning or time machine options for drive

    i have read cloning is a bad idea, and that i should install the drive new, then restore from a time machine latest back up?

    thoughts?
     
  14. treekram, Jan 1, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2016

    treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #14
    A good video from OWC on replacing the drive is at:
    http://eshop.macsales.com/installvideos/macbookpro_13_unibody_early11_hd/

    You will need a Phillips #00 and Torx T6 screwdriver.

    A lot of the people here on macrumors use cloning. What is the problems that you have read about? I don't see a problem with either method. But it will take some time. Unless you use a Thunderbolt drive for you backup, whatever method you use is going to be slow because you have USB2 (or perhaps Firewire 800, which wouldn't be as bad). You can try to find a friend who has 2 USB 3 docking stations or enclosures connected to a newer computer if you want to do it faster, otherwise you'll need to be patient.
     
  15. treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #15
    Looking at the threads, I saw this one which maybe the one you were referring to:

    http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/best-option-to-install-clone-new-hard-drive.1879417/

    The problems in that thread was when the SSD was in a USB docking station (or enclosure?) for cloning purposes. I had a problem with my Mac Mini not recognizing my SSD when it was in 3 docking stations (2 USB3 and a USB2). It worked in an old USB2 enclosure I hadn't used for some time. This was not the problem in the thread above but it does show the problems with SSD's in some docking stations/enclosures. If you have this problem, as suggested in the thread, put the SSD in the computer, put the HDD in the docking station/enclosure and boot from the HDD and clone that way. I didn't do it that way with my Mini because it's difficult to remove/replace the drive. For my 2012 non-Retina MBP (like the 2011 MBP) which is relatively easy to change the drive, I put the SSD into the MBP and the HDD in an docking station for cloning purposes. Because the computer was new, I hadn't done a TM backup, but had customized the computer somewhat, so cloning was the way to go.
     
  16. joffibiza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    #16
    I have no docking station.

    Can i time machine (as I already have arrive doing that?)

    And then install it new, and time machine restore?

    Will this work?

    How long will this take?

    Is it an easy process?
     
  17. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #17
    1. Yes, you can use time machine.

    2. Yes. Just follow the on screen instructions, a new OS X install will ask you if you want to migrate data over.

    3. Yes, it will work.

    4. Impossible to say, it depends on too many things. Why does it matter so long as it works?

    5. You have a few clicks to make, and that's it.


    A 2TB SSD is pretty expensive, do you truly need that much data with you at all times?
     
  18. treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #18
    Do you have the original install disks? If so, boot from the disk and hold down the "C" key after you turn it on.

    If you do not have the install disk, you can use Internet recovery, but you have to make sure you have the latest EFI.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201518

    Following the instructions to see if you have the latest EFI. If not, you need to install that first.

    Once you have the latest EFI, you can use the Internet recovery (requires network connectivity). See:

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201314

    Either booting from the install disk or Internet Recovery should take you to a Utilities menu. I think you have to first format your SSD - use the "GUID partition map" and "OSX Extented (Journaled)".

    After the SSD is formatted, go back to the Utilities menu and there's a menu item to restore from the Time Machine.

    I believe these are the right steps - somebody can correct me if not.

    Also, it would be good if you can buy an disk enclosure or docking station. Then you can use your HDD as a bootable clone which would serve as another backup in addition to Time Machine or allow you to boot from the HDD. You don't need a USB3 - a USB2 will be fine and will be cheaper since your computer is only USB2.

    If your HDD (750GB) is full, the fastest it will be is about 4 hours. It almost certainly will not be that fast. I would think at least 8 hours if your HDD is full.
     
  19. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    south
    #19
    sandy 13" is pretty capable, ivy is better (HD4000 GPU) but not that much. I'd go for the SSD, it will make it fly. And you can keep the SSD if you get a good deal in a 2012 you know :)
     
  20. treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #20
    Huh?
     
  21. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    south
    #21
    lets try that again... the 13" macbook pro sandy bridge (2011) is a pretty capable machine, the ivy bridge (2012) is slightly better, esp. in the iGPU (integrated graphic processing unit). Switching its horribly slow HDD to a SATA ssd will make it run the modern OSX versions a lot better. At least an order of magnitude better.

    And, you can keep the SSD if you have an opportunity to trade into a 2012.

    better? :)
     
  22. treekram macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Location:
    Honolulu HI
    #22
    I understood what you were saying, but the OP has apparently made the decision about which direction he wants to go (keep his existing machine and put a big SSD in it) and is now asking for help in implementing that.
     
  23. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    south
    #23
    oh, missed that sorry.

    when I did mine I just put the SSD in an external usb3 dock, carbon-copy-cloned the HDD into it and swapped them. worked like a charm.
    then moved the HDD into one of those 'optibay eliminator' things for extra storage.

    cheers
     

Share This Page