Macbook ram memory question!

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by VaDor, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. VaDor macrumors regular

    VaDor

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Location:
    Portugal,Palmela
    #1
    Hi,

    In apple site they say that "PC2-5300); two SO-DIMM slots support up to 2GB".

    I am a little confuse this is 2GB for EACH slot (so I can achieve 4gb in total) or max 1GB EACH slot (so I can achieve 2gb in total) ?
     
  2. yukon0013 macrumors regular

    yukon0013

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    #2
    Yeah its up to 2 GB total... people have been putting two 2gbs in and been able to use like 3.3 gb on their macbooks.
     
  3. kolax macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #3
    3.3GB is the maximum amount of RAM the MacBook can address. This is limited due to the CPU, nothing else.
     
  4. byakuya macrumors 6502a

    byakuya

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    #4
    Hi,
    I've come across this article on TUAW and was wondering:
    does it make sense to put in 2*2GB RAM in your Macbook? Will it work? or is the best setup to use 2*1GB RAMs? If you say max. is 3.3GB is it hypothetically possible to put in one 2GB RAM and 1GB RAM without any conflicts? Would appreciate any replies.
    On a side note: I have the MB C2D 2Ghz with Superdrive (the version before the latest update)

    byakuya
     
  5. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #5
    See the Guide on this subject

    VaDor: Apple's official specification is 2 Gb total (2 x 1 Gb SODIMMs)

    KM: Not limited by the CPU as such -- limited by the memory controller on the motherboard.

    By and YK: 3.3 is usable on Core2Duo Macbooks and MacBook Pros. CoreDuos are limited to 2 Gb. MBP and iMac C2D Santa Rosas can take the full 4 Gb

    On Core2Duos, you can install 1 Gb + 2 Gb, or 2 Gb + 2 Gb. The 4 Gb (really 3.3 Gb) install gives you as 6% - 8% advantage in average speed because of Dual Channel Memory access, but costs more, obviously.
     

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