MacBook RAM upgrade 200 pin vs. 240 pin count on mem card

thespiderprince

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 5, 2006
8
0
Does anyone know the significance of pin counts on memory cards?

Corsair doens't seem to offer a dual channel kit that's actually listed as compatible for upgrading the macbook. I haven't heard whether or not the 240 pin count will work on the MacBook. The applicable pin count is 200. Is this important? Some folks have said that they have had success with Gigaram's upgrade listed below.

(http://www.newegg.com/product/product.asp?item=N82E16820221043)
 

Heb1228

macrumors 68020
Feb 3, 2004
2,216
0
Virginia Beach, VA
You need 200-pin memory. And you'll be better off going with a company that guarantees compatibility with your Mac, like www.datamem.com or the crucial link at the top of the page. I tried getting memory from newegg and had to send back 4 sticks of RAM. They weren't bad sticks, just not compatible, Macs are just more picky about the RAM they'll use.
 

slooksterPSV

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2004
3,281
126
Nowheresville
I really really really doubt that the 240-pin RAM chip will fit into a MacBook, those chips are longer than the HDD. Ok the difference is size basically. 240 = PC, Desktop, Tower, etc. whatever you wanna call it. 200 = Portable, Laptop, Notebook. Before it was 184-pin = PC/Desk/Tower, and to an extent it still is. Follow the recommendations that Apple has outlined.

200-pin chip is like 2 or 3 inches long
240-pin chip is like 6 or 7 inches long
 

CanadaRAM

macrumors G5
MacBook RAM MUST be 200 pin SODIMMs, 667 MHz, no other.

Please consider purchasing from a reputable dealer who knows what a Mac is; and offers a guarantee of compatibility with your model Mac, a lifetime warranty, and a no-cost return if it doesn't work. You're right, Corsair does not offer guaranteed-Mac-compatible RAM in their ValueSelect or TwinX series.

MR readers most often recommend aof USA dealers: Crucial, OWC and Data Memory Systems.

DDR2-667 SODIMM is only part of the compatibility equation. If you were an experienced Mac-Adept, you might be comfortable doing your own testing with generic RAM and sending it back if it doesn't work. But if you are new to Mac hardware upgrading, spend the small extra and get RAM that's guaranteed to work.

Thanks
Trevor
CanadaRAM.com
 

TangoCharlie

macrumors member
Jul 21, 2004
80
0
Horsham, West Sussex
Picky, picky, picky!

Heb1228 said:
[snip] Macs are just more picky about the RAM they'll use.
I don't believe this is true. ALL computers are picky about thier RAM. I've learnt the hard way that it's best not to mix-and-match memory in any modern computer. If you use crappy memory or mix and match different makes, specs, etc., then your PC or mac will suffer random crashes, freezing etc. So, here's my guide to optimal memory upgrades....

Get good quality memory. You can tell what that look like... it's got a name on it!
Don't mix different makes.
Don't mix different specs.

P.S. BTW, Crucial UK lists the following specs for the MacBook RAM:

200-PIN SODIMM • DDR2 PC2-5300 • CL=5 • UNBUFFERED • NON-ECC • DDR2-667 • 1.8V

The 2G ram kit is listed as part number CT541623, and costs about 200 quid.
:)
 

Heb1228

macrumors 68020
Feb 3, 2004
2,216
0
Virginia Beach, VA
TangoCharlie said:
I don't believe this is true. ALL computers are picky about thier RAM.
I think you're right that cheap RAM in any computer is more likely to cause problems. But there seems to be a consensus around here that Macs tend to be more picky than PCs. PowerMacs G4s typically less-so that other models, and some (iMac G5) are notoriously more picky.

I don't have any qualms about mixing different brands of memory, I have two different kinds in this powerbook (currently 46-day uptime) without problems and my iMac just had a 50 day uptime with two different brands.

But the point remains the same, saving 20 or 30 dollars on a stick of memory is not worth the headaches that may come with cheap memory.
 

slooksterPSV

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2004
3,281
126
Nowheresville
Heb1228 said:
I think you're right that cheap RAM in any computer is more likely to cause problems. But there seems to be a consensus around here that Macs tend to be more picky than PCs. PowerMacs G4s typically less-so that other models, and some (iMac G5) are notoriously more picky.

I don't have any qualms about mixing different brands of memory, I have two different kinds in this powerbook (currently 46-day uptime) without problems and my iMac just had a 50 day uptime with two different brands.

But the point remains the same, saving 20 or 30 dollars on a stick of memory is not worth the headaches that may come with cheap memory.
Just be sure if you do get one that is 20, 40, 80 cheaper, then to make sure it has a lifetime warranty. The Omni-technologies 512MB Chip I have in mine, I chose that for $34.99 instead of going with a bit better known company for $39.99, but the $39.99 had a 2 year warranty where Omni ($34.99) has a lifetime warranty, so weigh your choices out.