Macbook retina 2013 vs 2011 graphic problem

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by patpatbut, Jul 27, 2014.

  1. patpatbut macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2009
    #1
    Hi all

    I had a MacBook Pro 2011 17 inch and the radeogate problem hit me. Luckily apple is happy to replace my macbook to new retina mac without cost

    I notice the new macbook retina does have dGpu as well. Considering most previous generation have the dGpu problem, what is the chance I will have the same problem again?

    Thanks
    Pat
     
  2. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #2
    We won't know until it's 3 years old.

    But as far as I know, the thermal paste was properly applied since the Ivy Bridge models with GT 650M. So GPU failures are less likely.

    In the 2011's Radeongate case, poorly-applied thermal paste lead to disrupted heat dissipation, hence causing the unleaded solder to break (unleaded solder is weaker than leaded solder). If the thermal paste was applied properly, the unleaded solder, although weaker than leaded, wouldn't have broken as fast.
     
  3. patpatbut, Jul 27, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014

    patpatbut thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    Macbook retina 2013 vs 2011 graphic problem

    Thanks I believe the new generation still use unleaded solder method. Even though better thermal paste is applied, does it mean ultimately the solder join could still fail ?
     
  4. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #4
    It will fail, but it'll take one hell of a lot longer time before it fails.

    I've still got a 2009 17" MBP with NVIDIA 9600M running fine today. It's never been sent in for repairs before (other than a new battery).

    The '09 models were already using unleaded solder at that time.

    Unleaded solder was used due to environmental concerns. However, some crucial appliances are exempted from environmental legislation and can use leaded solder. Such appliances range from medical equipment to military machines.
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #5
    Do you have any source material to state that the current models will succumb to the same fate?

    I can understand having angst, I'm nervous about my 2012 rMBP, but to state point blank that it will fail (unless I missed it) when there's been no news or articles about defective GPUs in the current MBPs

    ----------

    Personally OP, if you can get a MBP without dGPU, that might be enough for peace of mind. I don't think there's any evidence that the 2013 models will have GPU problems but given that the Iris Pro is a very capable GPU for most needs. I'd say go with that if you can.
     
  6. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #6
    They're all still using unleaded solder. Unleaded solder is weaker than leaded solder. So yes, it's most likely to still fail, but only after more than 6 years of usage, because at least this time, the thermal paste was properly applied.
     
  7. MarcusCarpenter macrumors 6502a

    MarcusCarpenter

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    London
    #7
    Define weaker, because Unleaded solder has a higher melting point than Leaded solder.
     
  8. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #8
    Computers have been using unleaded solder for years now, not just apple, so I'd say the usage of that product does not guarantee component failure.

    I'm no expert in this area, but from my uneducated perspective I don't think there's enough evidence to support that as fact. As opinion yes, but there's AFAIK, not fact.

    ----------

    Don't get me wrong, I'm very concerned about dPGUs on MBPs, and I'll probably avoid getting a dGPU equipped mac the next time I buy a new Mac, but I think its one thing to be concerned and another saying point blank it will fail.
     

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