macbook shocking me.. normal?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by ricecook, Jan 23, 2008.

  1. ricecook macrumors regular

    ricecook

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    #1
    my macbook shocks me sometimes i know it from friction but will it affect the hard ware inside the macbook?

    i can hear all the statics when i take my SPECK clear cover case from the macbook then SAP SAP SAP SAP..then i wont get shock any more may sometimes..

    THIS IS NORMAL RIGHT? NOT DAMAGING ANY HARDWARE/SOFTWARE?

    thanks
     
  2. psychofreak Retired

    psychofreak

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #2
    This is NOT normal. Stop using it and phone Apple asap.
     
  3. ricecook thread starter macrumors regular

    ricecook

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    #3
    well it only dose it when i take the cover off the macbook the plastic case collects lots of static from moving it in out from my carring case/slidding from my bed but after that its gone..and my weather as of now its pretty cold..

    dose any one have that problem? well depends on your weather climate..i think:confused:
     
  4. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #4
    There are certainly situations when bad things can happen, but psychofreak may be overreacting in this case--plastic friction + very dry winter air can lead to a significant amount of static. So long as you're POSITIVE (pun unintended) that's where the shock is coming from, you're physically safe. (Note, by the way, that static electricity is very high voltage compared to, say, a bad connection in the computer, which would likely be at much lower voltage, so the sort of crackly shock you get from static generally can't be generated by a malfunctioning laptop.)

    As for the question... probably ok. If the laptop is plugged in, and you're using the grounded cord with its brick (the 3 prong one as opposed to the 2-prong mini plug), then it's almost certainly ok--the metal case is grounded, which essentially eliminates any risk of electrical damage to the components.

    If its not plugged in, I can't be as confident. If the shock is coming from it, it should be superficial and thus safe. Any shock from you that hits the outside of the case would just travel to whatever it's grounded to, which should also be part of the case and thus safely away from any sensitive components. And I can't say I've ever heard of static damaging a computer outside of someone handling sensitive components inside. But at least theoretically there is some chance of a freak set of conditions frying something sensitive inside.

    I probably wouldn't worry about it, but I might make sure I was using a grounded plug.
     
  5. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    In a Hell predominately of my own making
    #5
    More importantly, why are you removing the Speck? It doesn't need removal except for replacement, or if you're really compulsive, cleaning every six months or so. Kind of an "install & forget" accessory. Also, leaving it on prevents shocks. ;)
     
  6. ricecook thread starter macrumors regular

    ricecook

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    #6
    do the case make the macbook heat up more? i mean it traps the heat under there are vent grills but i think it traps more heat..or it dosent matter it will not affect the temp of the macbook?
     
  7. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    In a Hell predominately of my own making
    #7
    I've had the Speck on my 2.16 MB for 9 months without removing it. It's no hotter than an uncovered one. The Speck has all the airflow it needs, the solid portions of the MB's case aren't an effective heatsink.
     
  8. ricecook thread starter macrumors regular

    ricecook

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    #8
    speaking of heat..do you think buying a laptop/notebook fan cooler is a good investment? will it help the macbook feel lil cooler? im looking to get one..
     
  9. zblaxberg Guest

    zblaxberg

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    #9
    No its normal at least for the macbook pro because I get shocked all the time and they replaced the cpu and fans which have nothing to do with it and I'm still getting shocked...Apple hasn't been impressing me lately.
     
  10. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #10
    My guess is you'd be better off just turning up the internal fan some. Using the freeware Fan Control pref pane, you can set a ramping curve that is cool enough for your taste without running the fan any harder (and thus noisier) than necessary. Using a relatively modest curve on that keeps my 17" MBP cool enough to use comfortably on my lap, and it's not only free but I don't need to fiddle with an unwieldy cooler (and the fan is pretty quiet so long as I'm not doing anything processor intensive).

    If you have other reason to want the physical cooler, that of course doesn't apply, and I expect it'll make at least some difference.

    Though... I just realized you're talking about a MB not a MBP, which will probably do a lot better using the internal fan than trying to dump heat through the solid plastic bottom.

    It also changes what I was saying about the static, mainly that there really isn't any way that the plastic parts of a MacBook could shock you due to a physical problem--that would ONLY be static, no question, and no risk to the laptop. Just don't go shoving your fingers into the USB or video out ports.


    zblaxberg: I seriously doubt Apple's design has anything whatsoever to do with static build up due to fiddling with a plastic cover for a plastic computer in very dry weather, nor could they realistically prevent (any more than a car company can prevent you from getting a shock when you slide out of an upholstered seat). If yours has a physical issue other than just static buildup, then that's obviously different (though I'd be a lot more inclined to suspect a bad ground in my house than the computer), but if it's static, that's almost certainly not the computer itself.
     

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