MacBook Vs MacBook Pro for Photography

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jsfpa, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. jsfpa macrumors regular

    jsfpa

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    #1
    I've notice when you see any professional photographers with a laptop, it's a MBP. Is there a reason for the MBP over the MB for photography? I can understand if you were doing video you might need the extra power but what are the benefits for still photography?
     
  2. Hmac macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 30, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    #2
    A MacBook would work fine for digital photography. The MBP is faster, but not fast enough to justify the cost difference, if you're counting that way. I do a lot of digital photography, including tethered shooting...I use a MacBook Pro.
     
  3. nick9191 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Britain
    #3
    Because of the glossy screen on the MacBook, which is no good for photography. That and the bigger screen.
     
  4. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #4
    If you use Aperture, a MBP will give you significant performance increases with raw image files since Aperture leverages the gpu. Adobe has also stated that with Photoshop CS4 it, too, will begin to significantly leverage the gpu's horsepower. If you don't plan on getting these, then a MB would be fine for all intents and purposes. With the savings over a MBP you can buy yourself a nice 24" matte display and bluetooth keyboard and mouse to go with it. While the second display won't perform as nicely as a second display on a MBP, it won't be too much of an issue.
     
  5. bart rijksen macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    #5
    The macbook pro is much better for it. You can take the 17 inch hi res, so all your pictures will look better. The pictures are more accurate in colors with matte, it has a real graphics card, that will help a lot with photoshop, and other photographic apps. So i think the mbp is a lot better
     
  6. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #6
    FWIW, Discreet graphics help in most cases, but Photoshop's activities are more raw mathematical functions (or something like that), but in any case, its more CPU and Ram intensive. GPU won't matter too much, but like another user posted, PS may utilize the advanced processing capabilities of a GPU.

    However, I wouldn't get a macbook, because it can't drive a 30-inch monitor (and I wouldn't show my clients my work on anything less).
     
  7. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #7
    Photoshop does not use GPU, nor does Aperture, or any pro-apps for that matter, so you need the small size, the MB is good enough.
     
  8. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    actually go read up on aperture. Aperture mainly uses the GPU, which is why it was dog slow on most machines when it first came out since most of apple's machines didn't have a decent GPU.

    And Macbook Pro's have a matte display which is better for color reproduction, so for any photography work a Macbook Pro is going to be a lot better than a Macbook.
     
  9. SubaruNation555 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Location:
    Arlington, VA USA
    #9
    I chose a MacBook Pro because of the matte screen option as well as the larger screen. The extra horsepower never hurts either.
     
  10. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #10
    Yo, Alphaod! Aperture does indeed use the gpu. This is the principal reason why Apple required a Mac with a dedicated graphics card when they released Aperture 1. It wouldn't even install on my Mini, thus I had to use Pacifist to get it onto it. But the sped pickup with a discrete gpu is remarkable, for sure.
     
  11. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #11
    Has virtually no relevance to the current Photoshop.

    The biggest problem with notebooks (not just Apple's, but all) is that they have 6-bit TN panels that make accurate evaluation of photos impossible. Regardless of which route the OP goes, s/he will need to buy an external display with an 8-bit panel if they want accurate rendition and fine control over tonal values.
     
  12. super98111 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    #12
    the viewing angle of Macbook is very limited and it is difficult to get good black and low grey.
     
  13. dtklamf macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    #13
    oh and the WOW factor as well.

    plus the larger screen doesn't hurt either
     

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