MacKeeper

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by moderngamenewb, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. moderngamenewb macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2011
    #1
    I am thinking about buying MacKeeper (since it's now 38 dollars on their website). Is it reliable? I tried using it for the fully functional trial to recover lost data (not that much important stuff, but I did want to see what I could get back). I tried to hit recover on the supposedly free functional 15 day trial, but they make you pay to recover. Is it worth the 38 dollars for long run? I use diskdrill from the app store, but it only recovers external drives (and it's not even that great). Has anybody tried using a fully functional version of MacKeeper? If so, what do you think about it?
     
  2. moderngamenewb thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2011
    #3
    Thqnks. After reading the posts, I don't think I'll be getting it.
     
  3. old-wiz macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Location:
    West Suburban Boston Ma
    #4
    When you consider the nasty marketing they use, I can't believe they are even a legit developer.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    I also recommend you stay away from MacKeeper and similar apps.

    You don't need "cleaner" or "maintenance" apps to keep your Mac running well, and some of these apps can do more harm than good. Some remove files/folders or unused languages or architectures, which does nothing more than free up some drive space, with the risk of deleting something important in the process.

    These apps will not make your Mac run faster or more efficiently, since having stuff stored on a drive does not impact performance, unless you're running out of drive space. Some of these apps delete caches, which can hurt performance, rather than help it, since more system resources are used and performance suffers while each cache is being rebuilt.

    Many of these tasks should only be done selectively to troubleshoot specific problems, not en masse as routine maintenance.

    Mac OS X does a good job of taking care of itself, without the need for 3rd party software. Among other things, it has its own maintenance scripts that run silently in the background on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, without user intervention.

     

Share This Page