MacOS 9.1 - software from 1997

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by Macarriffic, Jun 29, 2015.

  1. Macarriffic, Jun 29, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2015

    Macarriffic macrumors newbie

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    Jun 29, 2015
    #1
    i have an old powermac 9600, running OS 9.1 - i have alot of software from around that time... is it worth anything... and where can i find more software for OS 9 ??

    thank you.

    here is the list of all the warez,

    http://www.uploadable.ch/file/EPkU8aaMZJJ4/cd.zip
     
  2. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

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    #2
    Get ready for the OS9 legions here to help you out. They are around somewhere…
     
  3. Macarriffic thread starter macrumors newbie

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  4. motulist macrumors 601

    motulist

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    #4
    It's not worth any significant amount of money if that's what you're asking. Maybe you can find a buyer for like 20 bucks if you find a collector.
     
  5. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

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    #5
    I'm not sure the OP is asking the value from a purely monetary standpoint. I think perhaps the OP is trying to get a general idea of it's value so OP can be intelligent about any future purchases.
     
  6. Dronecatcher macrumors 68000

    Dronecatcher

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    #6
  7. Macarriffic, Jun 29, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 29, 2015

    Macarriffic thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #7
  8. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #8
    Macintosh Garden is my go-to.

    I love my 9600 200MP. I have a Radeon 9200 in it, which gives it great graphics performance. Look for a PCI Rage 128, Radeon 7000, or Radeon 9200 for both VGA support and graphics much better than standard card. Mine's pretty much exclusively a CivII machine :) (it's set up to a Quicksilver where I do a lot of real work) but is a solid performer. I can even get on the internet with it-it has a 10/100 card in it that helps internet speeds a fair bit(the on-board is 10baseT) and Classilla.

    Use OS 9 Helper to install 9.2.2 on it, and you will thank yourself for the performance increase it brings. Also throw a bunch of RAM at it. You can go as high as 1.5gb if you want to spend the money(around $150) although cheaper small-capacity sticks can still give a significant boost since you have 12 slots available.

    The computer will run OS X up to 10.2.8, although I personally don't see much point(there are few apps for that version of OSX that don't also have an OS 9 equivalent-the only benefit you might see is if you have the 200MP model).

    G3 and G4 upgrades are available. A G3 will allow you to install up to OS X 10.4.11 without a lot of work(although I'd personally take a 350mhz 604E over an equivalent speed G3 for sheer performance). With a G4 upgrade, it's possible to install OS X 10.5, albeit with a fair bit of work. I have an 8600(similar to a 9600, but with fewer PCI slots) with a 700mhz G4 where I'm(slowly) working on this installation.
     
  9. Dronecatcher macrumors 68000

    Dronecatcher

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    #9
    I think it's one of those 'grey areas.' On Macintoshgarden, there's software that certainly isn't free/shareware - I'd imagine that the site owners host stuff and are happy to comply with copyright owners requesting it's removal if necessary. Obviously, software that can still be bought can't be offered online for free.
    I'd get in touch with Macintoshgarden and ask their advice - that's probably the best site to share historical software, there's great stuff on there.
    If you're interested in making music on OS 9, MacOS9Lives is a great resource too:
    http://macos9lives.com/smforum/
     
  10. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #10
    They've had a few in take-downs the past. You won't find any Maxis game downloads on there, for example, because whoever owns Maxis now requested it.

    There are also several programs which have have pages on Macintosh garden but no download because the software is still available for purchase.
     
  11. Macarriffic thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #11

    ill email MacintoshGarden and ask what i should do with all my (c) stuff. cheers!
     
  12. Macarriffic thread starter macrumors newbie

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  13. mzs.112000 macrumors regular

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    #13
  14. motulist, Jul 13, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2015

    motulist macrumors 601

    motulist

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    #14
    While that's true in general, once software becomes old enough it enters a sort of legal gray area. That's the same reason why even big organizations like archive.org can offer free copies of old obsolete software

    https://archive.org/details/software
     
  15. Macarriffic thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #15
    this is software from 1996,1997,1998 - all abondonware i hope.
     
  16. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    #16
    It's not a gray area at all - software falls under copyright law, and in the US, copyrights for anything written recent enough to be software is essentially guaranteed to stay protected under copyright until everyone reading this forum today is dead.

    The original author (or author company) retains all rights to the distribution of their software. The vast majority of software is licensed - meaning you must agree to certain terms to be permitted to use it. Those licenses are legally binding in the US. There is no such legal definition of "abandonware". Just as with books, if software goes "out of print," the original author still retains the copyright, and if that author doesn't make it available via some allowed means (or the author "vanishes" and no permission gan be gotten,) then the only legal way to get it is to purchase a legally-allowed previously-published copy.

    Just because a book is no longer printed by a publisher, and the author is dead, doesn't mean anyone can just photocopy and give away that book.

    Archive.org gets permission for all media it hosts. Audio, video, text, and software. Many authors of software that is obsolete have willingly granted "free license" for the use of it. But many haven't - especially "large commercial" program (such as Mac OS 9.) In many cases, it is because the large commercial programs use pieces licensed from other companies, and getting permission from *THEM* is near-impossible.

    Lastly, just because something is firmly prohibited by law doesn't always guarantee it will be pursued. Many companies turn a blind eye to piracy of obsolete versions of their software, just as some law enforcement agencies turn a blind eye to enforcing certain laws (jaywalking is a commonly unenforced law.) It doesn't make the behavior legal, it just means it goes unenforced. That is why Macintosh Garden is generally allowed - if an author complains, Macintosh Garden removes their software.

    Again, There is no such legal definition of "abandonware". Just as there is no such thing as "legal illicit drugs". There is just "unenforced violations." It doesn't matter that Apple hasn't sold Mac OS 9 in 12 years. Unlike patents, there is no short-time expiration beyond which it's legal to duplicate. With software, covered under copyright, the SHORTEST time something would fall into the Public Domain is 70 years (assuming it was self-published by the author, and the author died immediately after publication, as individually-authored works retain copyright for the life of the author plus 70 years.) "Works for hire" (as most products by large companies are,) are 95 to 120 years.

    Note that these times are for any copyrightable work created in 1978 or later - covering nearly all software we might possibly be discussing. For works created in 1978 or later, copyright is automatic upon creation, and falls under the 70-120 year copyright range.
     
  17. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #17
    I believe that there is a process to release the copyright for "abandoned" media. I haven't researched it extensively, but basically it requires that you make extensive effort to contact the author and then make your argument before a court.
     
  18. Macarriffic thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #18
    first, you have to prove that your work is original, then you have to enforce it - like george lucas. theres nothing AUTOMATIC about it.
     
  19. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    #19
    There was an effort to pass a law allowing that for orphaned works (the legal term for abandoned copyrighted works,) but it failed. Under current US law, an orphaned work is completely illegal to reproduce. You have to wait for the copyright to expire.

    The legal protection is automatic. Enforcement isn't. But speed limit enforcement isn't automatic, either - you must have a police officer there to record you speeding and pull you over. That doesn't make it legal to speed just because there is no police officer there.
     

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