MacPro Anti Virus

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by bentotzky, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. bentotzky macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    #1
    Can someone share their opinion regarding antivirus for MacPro (laptop). Is AVG 2011 and Malwarebytes is compatible with MacPro.
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
    Btw, it is called a MacBook Pro, the Mac Pro is the high end desktop tower Apple offers. And as Mac OS X runs across all Macs, software is compatible too and not tied to hardware, unless it depends on GPUs and such. But AV software does only need precious CPU cycles to eat away.

    All current Macs offered by Apple: www.apple.com/mac

    All threads about opinions about AV software on Mac OS X: MRoogle
     
  3. aussie_geek macrumors 65816

    aussie_geek

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    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    #3
    ^^^ LOL^^^ @ simsaladimbamba..

    Anyway..

    Those programs are not available on mac. The mac versions of antivirus to choose from are:
    Norton, Kaspersky, Eset, Intego to name a few paid ones.

    I am using Sophos on my Macs and it runs fine in the background - no effect on performance. You can get this for free.

    Another one is virusbarrier express on the app store - free also. It does not monitor the system - it is similar to malwarebytes free version. You can set up scans etc.

    Sophos is great and it's free - give it a go.
     
  4. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    Aug 24, 2009
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    UK
    #4
    Why use an Antivirus on OS X? That's like buying a lamp for a perfectly naturally well lit room. In my entire 3 years of having a Mac now, I have had a total of 0 of these OS X trojans.

    The built in security system in Snow Leopard detects them anyway. Not to mention you need to actually install them (including entering your admin password) to get them.

    A/V software is pretty pointless on OS X.
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #5
    Agreed, I've been on the mac platform since the MAC SE days and I've never had one single malware issue.
     
  6. bobr1952 macrumors 68020

    bobr1952

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    Jan 21, 2008
    Location:
    Melbourne, FL
    #6
    ^^
    Another chicken and egg thread. Your reply pretty much sums it up really. Seems every time I talk to any Windows user they all have a story about viruses, malware, or trojans--but no stories--just theories about OS-X. So until theories become reality, I'll stick to the common sense approach. :)
     
  7. gks, Jan 16, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011

    gks macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    #7
    For anyone wondering why you'd want to run an antivirus program on a mac.

    While there isn't a reason to use it to protect your mac it is a good idea if you're concerned about sending files that may have a virus attached to it to a windows machine.

    If you download a file, and it has a virus. It won't do anything to your mac. But if you send that file to someone with a computer running windows, or open it in a VMWare Fusion or Parallels install, you risk infecting that installation of Windows.

    By running an antivirus app on a Mac you are able to clean those files, while it won't necessarily benefit your Mac, it will benefit anyone else who may receive that file. It might be a good idea if you have a few Windows computers in the house that you're afraid of infecting.

    Now, one of the things I can tell you about viruses. Common sense goes a long way. If it is coming from a shady source, odds are it could have a virus. If you get your files from a legit source you're probably better off not worrying as much.

    So... In summary. if you have zero common sense, get an antivirus app, if you go to shady locations online, get an antivirus app ONLY if you have a windows installation somewhere that you're afraid of infecting. Otherwise, don't worry about it.
     
  8. Brumbie13 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    #8
    I have Intego VirusBarrier X6.
    It is comprehensive, and runs smoothly in the background. It does not slow my computer down. Not much slows my computer down, actually. :)

    VirusBarrier X6 is pricey, but I think it is one of the best AntiVirus programmes to have on a Mac. I have no regrets. I scan everything I download.
     
  9. munkery macrumors 68020

    munkery

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    #9
    If you require AV software for work or to connect to a specific network, use ClamXav or VirusBarrier Express. If otherwise, do not bother yourself with AV software.

    I recommend ClamXav over VB E as ClamXav can be configured to have on-access scanning for specific folders.
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #10
    Actually, it's more like installing a specialized lock that only keeps out burglars from Mars. First, there ARE no Martian burglars roaming around that have ever burglarized anyone. Second, even if there were, how do you know what they look like or how to keep them out? That's how useful antivirus apps are for keeping a Mac safe. :D
     
  11. gks macrumors 6502

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    Aug 16, 2010
    #11
    I'd suggest reading my post further up. It actually gives a good reason for using antivirus on a mac... granted, it isn't for the security of the mac, but other computers running windows that you have access to (including friends you may send files to)

    A virus still exists in files on a Mac, the only thing preventing them from doing anything is they can't really be executed on the mac. But, send that infected file to a Windows computer and it'll do what it was intended to do.

    Just because it isn't going to harm your computer, doesn't mean it can't harm other computers should that file be put on another machine.
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #12
    I did read it. I suggest you read the link that simsaladimbamba posted in the 2nd post in this thread. As stated there, any Windows user not running their own antivirus is at a much greater risk of infection from sources other than a Mac user sending a file. The only way a Mac user can get an infected file is to first receive it from a Windows user. It's like saying I'll drive on the access road to keep from running over someone walking around on the freeway. They've got much bigger worries than me. The common sense approach is for every Windows user to run their own antivirus software, so they're protected from threats, regardless of the source.
     
  13. gks macrumors 6502

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    Aug 16, 2010
    #13
    I get that. But at the same time, running an Antivirus software on your mac shouldn't be such a big deal. So long as the user understands why they should be running it anyway.
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #14
    Except it uses system resources and benefits no one but any Windows user who's not prudent enough to run their own AV. If someone wants to do it, that's fine. I prefer not to add to my Mac's workload, simply for the benefit of someone who doesn't care enough to protect their own computer.

    You're not doing them a favor by shielding them from malware from your Mac, but leaving them exposed to millions of other sources. If you really want to help, get them to install AV on their own system.
     
  15. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #15
    I have used Macs since 1987 and the only AV I ever used was Norton, and it all but ruined my Mac to where I had to do a clean install just to get rid of the nasty beast

    I have never used any AV since

    I will install AV on my Mac only when:

    1. There is an actual virus
    2. There is an AV that will protect against that virus

    Neither of those conditions exist, so I will remain AV free

    Until then, I will practice safe computing and use common sense
    I will be aware of what I install and why I am entering my Administrator's password

    I do understand the possibility of transmitting a Windows virus
    But the AV responsibility lies with the Windows user, not with me
    Besides, my GF and my kids all use Macs :p

    This topic gets bludgeoned every week here on MR
    The arguments never change and you could go to any of several dozen threads and read the same thing ad infinitum
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #16
    You're absolutely right. Of course, there wouldn't be so many threads on this if people took the time to read some of the existing ones before starting new ones.
     
  17. gks macrumors 6502

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    Aug 16, 2010
    #17
    No no, what if I have my own windows computer over here? My primarily machine would be my mac, but lets say I transfer files all over the place and files on my Mac may end up on my PC.

    Or maybe I'm in a mixed office with a fair number of Macs and PCs running Windows.

    Sometimes it's just easier to have an antivirus program running. Again, it isn't helping my Mac, but it is helping me in the long run with my Windows machines. Or in an office setting it's helping the other Windows users...

    Imagine sending a file to a friend and their antivirus pops up "such and such a virus was found" and they blame you for sending them a virus.

    For the record, I'm not running an Antivirus program but I can see how there would be a big reason for wanting to run one.
     
  18. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    Aug 24, 2009
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    UK
    #18
    Macs cannot run Windows programs or malware, so how do you suppose your Mac could infect a PC unless you deliberately put a a virus exe onto a memory stick and executed it on a PC.

    It doesn't help anything in the long run and it is simply impossible for OS X to spread a PC virus.
     
  19. displaced macrumors 65816

    displaced

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    Location:
    Gravesend, United Kingdom
    #19
    Unfortunately, that's not true.

    Many PC viruses spread via infected Word documents, or even maliciously-crafted image or PDF files which exploit vulnerabilities in Windows' image rendering routines (or for PDFs, weaknesses in myriad versions of Adobe PDF Reader).

    Whilst these exploits will do nothing on the Mac, simply forwarding this documents to PCs via email can be enough to infect those PCs.

    Of course, one argument is that it's up to PC users to ensure their machines are up-to-date and protected, not us Mac users to help them out. But, particularly if you're in a business environment, this might not be acceptable.
     
  20. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    Aug 24, 2009
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    #20
    In which the PC antivirus will hopefully find and eliminate the threat. Having the antivirus on your Mac is just a waste of RAM.
     
  21. HDOT macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    #21
    virusbarrier X6 for sure...

    I'm using virusbarrier X6 too and it's great, it's the best, I love it and use it for many years now....it doesn't slow down my mac at all and it's more than just an antivirus because it also includes a firewall and antiphishing tools :)

    if you don't trust me, just have a look on that:
    http://mac-antivirus-software-review.toptenreviews.com/intego-virusbarrier-review.html

    for those who are wondering about what happened in 2010 regarding mac security, just have a look on that:
    http://blog.intego.com/2011/01/19/the-year-in-mac-security-2010/
     
  22. displaced macrumors 65816

    displaced

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    Jun 23, 2003
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    #22
    Sure -- but that doesn't change the fact that it's possible for a non-AV-running Mac user to infect a PC.

    For example, if your business is Mac-based and you forward on a document containing a virus to a client, you're not going to look very good. Even if their AV software removes the threat, it won't instil confidence in you if you're seen to be spreading viruses.

    Or perhaps you'd originally written your CV in a Word document on a PC but have been updating it on your Mac. You'd probably want to give that file a quick scan before sending it as part of your job application - just in case it's picked something up whilst being open on a PC.

    It's horses-for-courses at the end of the day. I wouldn't run AV on a Mac unless I had a specific need to do so (such as that explained above).
     
  23. gks macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    #23
    At least there's one person that grasps the concept I've tried to explain across 4 different posts... maybe all hope is not lost on the MacRumors Forum... Just.. most hope.
     

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