MacPro Pricing Question

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by dvince2, Oct 1, 2008.

  1. dvince2 macrumors 6502

    dvince2

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #1
    Hey Everyone.

    I'm looking into getting a mac pro in the near future. I'm presently using a CD Macbook which, as good as it is, just can't perform in my school program (Computer Science and Game Development).
    I'm looking to get myself an entry level Mac Pro, which gives me lots of power immediately, plus gives me the option to update and add more in the future.

    Presently, the Mac Pro is $2899 CND (I realize thats before student discount, I'm just working in standard prices) for the entry level model. But, you are able to configure it to have a single quad core (instead of 2) for -$500, bringing the total to $2399. A Quad core would be enough for what I'm doing, so I would go this route.

    My Question is this:

    Has this been the norm in the Power Mac/ Mac Pro line? If I wait for Core i7 to come to the Mac Pro, will the $2399 model disappear for only 2900+ models?
    I'd like to stay current with technology and can wait until it's released, but I don't want to pay that much for a computer.

    Thanks
     
  2. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #2
    Both versions of the Mac Pro have had a cheaper option. The first was quad 2.0GHz down from 2.66GHz. There is no reason to think that there won't be a single quadcore option again next time.
     
  3. dvince2 thread starter macrumors 6502

    dvince2

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    Thanks Umbongo. I wasn't sure if the cheaper model was always an option or just with the octo-core ones.:)
     
  4. zer0tails macrumors 65816

    zer0tails

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #4
    what about a refurb? It's 200 dollars cheaper than the student discount.
     
  5. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #5
    Refurbs are an excellent alternative to "new". ;)
    They have the same warranty, and have been tested. :)

    Just make sure of the specs of the unit you're ordering are what you think they are. Not in the sense of a rip-off, but refurbs offered can include older models as well.

    It's a great way to get a good machine for a lower cost, so don't be afraid of them. :D
     
  6. gotzero macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2007
    Location:
    Mid-Atlantic, US
    #6
    I second the refurb option. I am writing on a refurb MP now, and I could not be happier. It is my fourth refurb apple, and I have never had as much as a ding (and there are sometimes surprise upgrades).
     
  7. sneezymarble macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    #7
    Have you thought about building your own "Mac" Pro? I don't pretend the option is for everyone but it's been fun for me and it's saved me literally thousands of dollars.

    I've been running Leopard, starting with 10.5.1, on the system in my sig since last December. When I put the system together last December the total cost of the parts from Newegg, including cooling for my overclock, overnight shipping, and a retail copy of Leopard, was $1300. For comparison, the current quad core Mac Pro with the same configuration as the system in my sig would cost $4000 from Apple.

    Even if you bought the quad core Mac Pro as a barebones system ($2,299) and then added an additional 6GBs of ram, a better video card, and another hard drive you'd still end up spending about $3000. What's even more impressive is that my system outperforms a similarly configured quad core Mac Pro in Geekbench 2 (32bit and 64bit) and Xbench. It runs beautifully. I've never had any problems with and I use pretty demanding programs (Final Cut, Photoshop, Painter X, Premiere, etc).

    Every time I've installed Leopard it's taken less time than it takes to install Vista and I've yet to run into a show stopping problem. Sure, I don't have the expandability you would have with an authentic Mac Pro with respect to ram but I'm not going to use this thing to render Hollywood movies or anything. 8GBs is more than enough!

    If you wanted more expandability you could build a system using an Intel dual socket server board with more ram slots.

    Anyway, just something to consider.
     
  8. zer0tails macrumors 65816

    zer0tails

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #8
    yeah i should have added that I too bought a refurb mac pro. Although, I could have used my education discount, the 200 dollar difference was a big one. I used the 200 dollars saved to buy myself 4GB of RAM. Sold the keyboard and mouse since I already had a set, and am going to use that towards getting Apple care.
     
  9. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #9
    Interesting method of financing the Apple Care. ;) :p
    Not bad. :D
     
  10. zer0tails macrumors 65816

    zer0tails

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #10
    thanks :p

    Just to add, if you were to go refurb, you could then consider the dual 2.8 as a viable possibility. 2399 (new) vs. 2499 (refurb) Huge upgrade there for 100 bucks, and it would further future proof the mac pro.

    Plus when Snow Leopard comes around, and as more applications begin to take more advantage of multi-core technology, your mac pro can only get better. I also think that for the work you do, having the extra quad core would be nice, and useful.
     
  11. akdj macrumors 65816

    akdj

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Location:
    Alaska
    #11
    The upgrade to dual quad core procs is actually a helluva deal. Considering the price of one of those processors is still north of $800!
     
  12. Sinarman macrumors newbie

    Sinarman

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Co. Cork, Ireland.
    #12
    I too have spent the last couple of weeks pondering over the purchase price of a Pro and trying to justify the extra cost of an 8 core 2.8 as opposed to the single processor.

    My requirements could certainly be met by the cheaper model (2D photographic mostly working on large individual images, infrequent batch processing, some panoramic stitching; Design layout; using Dreamweaver and the rest of the CS3 Design package; usual office tasks; Browsing, Facebook, etc.) and any Pro would adequately ensure "future proofing" and the ability to upgrade and expand, obviously the 8 core model slightly more so.

    Additionally, bearing in mind that: the most optimistic dates for the "Nehalem" Pro's ready availability over the counter is now March '09 (more likely September here in Ireland); Adobe's 64-bit Mac suite is probably one-two years away; and Sno Leopard perhaps as long as eight months (if other Posts are to be relied on) then the 4 core seems to be waving it's pom-poms as a justifiable purchase, for me, at the moment.

    Anyway, why does a sardonic smile touch my lips when I read of others agonising over the purchase price of their new Mac Pro, particularly in $US? Well, just take a look at what we are being asked to pay in the Euro zone! Even £Sterling, taking into account the exchange rate, is hundreds cheaper.

    No disrespect intended to anyone, by the way, the market is what it is but just to add insult to injury the plant where Apple manufacture these computers is only half an hour down the road from where I'm writing this.

    You (the OP) could equip yourself with an 8 core Mac Pro and a top of the line MacBook Pro for the equivalent layout! Am I jealous? You'd better believe it!

    Getting serious for a moment, I'd like to suggest that anyone for whom money is an issue and who believes the Pro to be the best platform for their foreseeable requirements should seriously consider purchasing one of the current models, now. Why? Because I think the Mac line up is going to change (perhaps as soon as January?), with the introduction of the long overdue "Semi Pro/ Mac Mini replacement" model; ie: monitor extra.

    It seems obvious that, in it's next incarnation, the Pro will become over-specced for anyone except the heaviest power users and so this will evolve into an elite model (ie: more expensive) and the new product (probably a midi-desktop design with perhaps two H/drive bays, a blueray drive, and up to 8GB of ram - can you say "Insipidron" - no thats unfair, I've had good mileage from Dell in the past) will charm us with it's stylish looks and, no doubt, custom docking ports for your i-accessories.

    I know I'm just trying to justify my own purchase but I intend to buy the Pro now (whilst it's still just affordable for someone like me) enjoy the benefits from the excellent speed, ergonomics, case design, and ECC memory, and to use it until the software, hopefully one day, exceeds the hardware's capacity.

    At which point I shall no doubt ponder the acquisition of the unbeliveably specced Mac Pro of 20?? (an Olympics special edition capable of virtual participation in the Beach Volleyball contest?).

    Now then... 4 cores or 8...? Anyone need a left testicle? Going cheap at 4000 Euros...

    Have a good day, everyone!

    S.
     
  13. sneezymarble macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    #13
    I guess my sig isn't showing up. Here's the computer I'm referring to in my post above.

    Inetel Core 2 Quad Q6600 3.6GHz
    GA-P35-DS3L Motherboard
    8GBs DDR2 800MHz Ram
    nVidia Geforce 8800GTX 768MBs

    The point being that if you've got the know how you can build a "Mac Pro" for thousands cheaper including the cost of a retail Leopard installation disc and it will perform the same (actually better) than a similarly configured authentic Mac Pro.
     
  14. designed macrumors 6502

    designed

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Finland
    #14
    Sneezy: How do you fool the Leopard to think it's Mac?
     
  15. fiatlux macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    #15
    sneezymarble, your computer, equipped with a Q6600 overclocked at 3.6GHz, may match the performance of a Mac Pro, especially on single threaded applications, but it is NOT similarly configured.

    You can't seriously compare a Core 2 Quad with regular DDR2 RAM to a dual Xeon system with FB ECC RAM, even if I concur the latter does not always bring real life improvements. A Mac Pro will go all the way up to 32GB of RAM for instance, which may be of importance to some. Try building a similar workstation from parts and the saving will be much less.

    Now, I understand your approach and also tried installing OS X on a cheaper upgradable PC. But do not confuse others: installing OS X on a non-Mac isn't straightforward and involves hacking and hunting for compatible parts/drivers. I've given up and decided my spare time was too valuable to waste it in trying to solve compatibility issues.
     
  16. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #16
    We don't discuss that here.
     

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