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Apr 12, 2001
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To celebrate the upcoming launch of the new Mac Studio from Apple, we've teamed up with GRID Studio to offer MacRumors readers a chance to win a new M1 Max Mac Studio or one of GRID Studio's deconstructed Apple device art pieces.

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GRID Studio is known for creating art from vintage Apple devices that are an important part of Apple's history. Each device is disassembled, and the components are artfully displayed behind a glass frame that can be hung on the wall of any Apple fan.

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Because GRID Studio works with classic Apple devices, there won't be any deconstructed Mac Studio art pieces for sale for some time, but there are plenty of other offerings on the GRID Studio website, with prices starting at around $40 and going up depending on complexity.

The GRID 1, for example, is one of GRID Studio's most popular pieces because it features an original iPhone, perhaps the most important device in Apple's history. Priced at $400, the GRID 1 is often sold out, but GRID Studio has a new series of GRID 1 pieces coming later in March.

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Measuring in at 13x13x8, the GRID 1 features a torn apart iPhone with all of the internal components separated out and labeled so you can see everything that made the original iPhone so special at a glance. The shell of the iPhone is displayed next to individual components that include the power button, headphone socket, speaker, logic board, circuit board, ear piece, and other components.

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Each piece of GRID art highlights what was important about the featured iPhone. With the $140 GRID iPhone 4S, for example, there's a clear look at the classic squared-off edges that Apple recently brought back for the iPhone 12 and iPhone 13, along with the circular volume buttons and the A5 chipset.

If you have a favorite classic iPhone, there's a good chance that GRID has taken it apart. In addition to the original iPhone, there are also GRID pieces for everything up to the iPhone X, along with A-series chips like the A5X, the Apple Watch, the Magic Mouse, and more.

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The $269 GRID iPhone X is interesting because the iPhone X was Apple's first iPhone with a notch and the Face ID facial recognition system. You can see the Face ID components laid out next to other iPhone X parts like the dual-lens camera, Taptic Engine, and A11 Bionic chip.

Every GRID Studio piece includes all of the original parts of the device, but the company does not use real batteries to prevent any issues with the battery expanding or exploding with age. GRID's artwork is perfect for an office decoration or as a gift for an Apple fan. Disassembled devices are attractive to look at, informative, and offer a fun glimpse into Apple's history.

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One grand prize winner will receive an M1 Max Mac Studio with 10-core GPU, 24-core GPU, 32GB unified memory, and 512GB SSD, plus a GRID 1 that features the original iPhone. A second prize winner will receive the GRID iPhone X, a third prize winner will receive the GRID iPhone 4S, and three additional winners will receive the GRID A5X.

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To enter to win our giveaway for one of GRID Studio's art pieces, use the Gleam.io widget below and enter an email address. Email addresses will be used solely for contact purposes to reach the winners and send the prizes. You can earn additional entries by subscribing to our weekly newsletter, subscribing to our YouTube channel, following us on Twitter, following us on Instagram, or visiting the MacRumors Facebook page.

Due to the complexities of international laws regarding giveaways, only U.S. residents who are 18 years or older, UK residents who are 18 years or older, and Canadian residents (excluding Quebec) who have reached the age of majority in their province or territory are eligible to enter. All federal, state, provincial, and/or local taxes, fees, and surcharges are the sole responsibility of the prize winner. To offer feedback or get more information on the giveaway restrictions, please refer to our Site Feedback section, as that is where discussion of the rules will be redirected.

The contest will run from today (March 10) at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time through 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time on March 17. The winners will be chosen randomly on March 17 and will be contacted by email. The winners will have 48 hours to respond and provide a shipping address before new winners are chosen.

Article Link: MacRumors Giveaway: Win a New Mac Studio From GRID Studio
 

dysamoria

macrumors 68000
Dec 8, 2011
1,698
1,325
Uh... I’m all for art... I try to be an artist sometimes myself... but the cost of these things as working tools is so high that I would always rather have a working machine than one disassembled and turned into an art project. ??‍♂️

EDIT: Nevermind. Reading comprehension fail. Or skimming. Not sure which. The Mac Studio prize isn’t turned into an art display. But I still don’t want to add myself to yet another mailing list, so...

EDIT 2: ... then again, I’m poor and have no chance of not being poor, so, sacrifice of email address is less expensive than buying a lottery ticket. I hate my life.
 

jclo

Editor
Staff member
Dec 7, 2012
1,864
3,985
California
Part of me always wonders about the legitimacy of these kinds of giveaways. There is very little transparency into how they are run, no real oversight to stop them from doing shady things. All we can do is hope that one day we end up being the lucky one.

Giveaways are run by me, MacRumors Senior Editor of 10 years. A company that wants to give away something to MR readers emails me, I write up a giveaway article, I create a giveaway widget in Gleam, and I publish. Giveaways run for one week, at which point I use the built-in Gleam random number generator to pick a winner. I email said winner, collect their contact details, and provide those details to the partner company to ship the prize. There is indeed oversight.
 

dysamoria

macrumors 68000
Dec 8, 2011
1,698
1,325
I never win crap.
I’ve won stuff, but it’s always been kinda... meh, ultimately.

As a kid, I once won a complete Borland Object Pascal developer package by raffle just by attending a local(?) Borland development seminar. My dad was thinking I’d become a programmer (parents really tried to push me away from music or art! ?).

Oh the irony of winning a development kit. I can’t program; I have dyscalculia. Trying to learn Object Pascal really drove the point home (yet, I tried to learn C++ during my BeOS days anyway; foolish). I recycled the Borland package’s many pounds of ancient and useless documentation fairly recently.

Then I won Windows 98se from Microsoft Magazine because I submitted the winning tip of adding Notepad to the SendTo context menu (well, it really was a good tip).

Oh the irony of winning something from Microsoft (a company I learned to hate some time between Windows XP and Vista; entirely earned hate, via Microsoft’s many abuses & failures). Not to mention this prize just helped Microsoft further the goal of entrenching Windows usage.

Then I finally won something actually appropriate to my interests: Future Music sent me an M-Audio Sputnik microphone for some magazine contest or raffle (I can’t remember which anymore).

It’s the ONLY example of expensive M-Audio products I own that wasn’t turned into useless garbage by the sale of M-Audio by Avid to the scummy inMusic Brands corporate vulture (OS driver support was dropped for all FireWire products after the sale, turning my ProjectMix I/O and LightBridge units into garbage as soon as I upgraded beyond Snow Leopard; replacing both has been costly and incomplete).

The still-useful Sputnik microphone is the only one in which I did NOT actually invest any of my own money. It’s a nice microphone. It even came with a shock mount. The thing is, I already had bought a Neumann TLM103 microphone years prior, so I didn’t need the Sputnik (they didn’t have an alternative prize to offer, so I accepted it).

Winning isn’t everything... ?
 
Last edited:

HylianKnight

macrumors 6502
Jul 18, 2017
389
364
Giveaways are run by me, MacRumors Senior Editor of 10 years. A company that wants to give away something to MR readers emails me, I write up a giveaway article, I create a giveaway widget in Gleam, and I publish. Giveaways run for one week, at which point I use the built-in Gleam random number generator to pick a winner. I email said winner, collect their contact details, and provide those details to the partner company to ship the prize. There is indeed oversight.
Followup question: Is the ending of the email address that winners should be on the lookout for @MacRumors.com? Thank you.
 
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