Made the jump :)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Josher22, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. Josher22 macrumors newbie

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    Jun 29, 2011
    #1
    Hey guys,

    I'm new in the Mac world. Just bought my first apple computer; a 13' macbook pro base model. I've always had PC laptops...3 HP computers. Each of them has had problems with them. 2 of the most recent had viruses. I never really paid any attention to anti-virus software.

    Is anti-virus software really necessary on a Mac? I hear they're pretty good at keeping clean...
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #2
    You don't need any antivirus software to protect your Mac. No viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any, since it was released 10 years ago. The handful of trojans that exist can be easily avoided with some basic education, common sense and care in what software you install:

    You may have better success in attracting responses to your thread, and you'll make your thread easier to find for those searching for the same answers, if you follow this tip.
     
  3. Genocide macrumors member

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    Jun 7, 2011
    #3
    While there are significantly less threats towards your Mac it is always a good idea to have anti-virus software running on your computer. A cheap program is all you need for a Mac, this will stop basic threats from infecting your computer.

    All in all, there is a significantly lower risk of your Mac being infected, though it is good practice to always have something to protect such an investment.
     
  4. Josher22 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jun 29, 2011
    #4
    Thanks for your help!
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #5
    It's really not necessary. Read my post and the link to find out why.
     
  6. Genocide macrumors member

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    Jun 7, 2011
    #6
    The above information is wrong, there has been a virus for Mac. See link:

    http://computer.howstuffworks.com/worst-computer-viruses9.htm

    Also, solely relying on the user to determine whether or not a file may contain a trojan is not very good security. While many users will be able to distinguish these files as infected, unexperienced users may not. This is not to call the OP an unexperienced user though assuming that everyone can tell whether a trojan exists simply by common sense is not what I call top notch security, and a simple anti-virus software program can efficiently detect this.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #7
    Leap-A is not a virus, despite what an uninformed blogger says. It cannot spread without user action.
    Read the link I posted to learn the difference between a virus, trojan, worm, etc.
    If you don't install pirated software or software from less-than-reputable sites, you don't have to worry about trojans. Even inexperienced users can remember not to torrent apps or install software from porn sites, etc.
     
  8. Genocide macrumors member

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    #8
    While it may have been erroneously dubbed a virus, yet is in fact a worm, it still poses a threat to the computer. Also, since the worm propagated through iChat it would be harder for the user to simply use common sense to identify it as a worm.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #9
    If you're determined to run antivirus on your Mac, that's your choice. However, it isn't required if the user employs safe computing practices. No antivirus can protect a Mac from careless or irresponsible user actions.

    Before you go down this road with me, you would do well to read the link I posted, then read a few of the many Mac virus/malware threads where I've had this same discussion with numerous others. It will save us both a lot of typing.
     
  10. Genocide macrumors member

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    #10
    Not all infected software programs are downloaded from such common places. Recently the program known as MacShield tricked many users into downloading the infected software by using a simple fear tactic that worked on many inexperienced users.

    On a side note, I don't run anti-virus software on my computer :p. Though I recommend it for less experienced users, or people who like the extra protection. And considering the OP said he just switched to Mac he is probably inexperienced with the OS.
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #11
    And safe computing practices suggest that you don't install software when you didn't initiate the installation process. PLEASE stop posting until you've read the Mac Virus/Malware Info link I posted. You're just rehashing the same uninformed arguments that have been shot down dozens of times. Rather than embarrassing yourself, educate yourself.
    Inexperienced users need to understand and practice safe computing. They don't need an antivirus app giving them a false sense of security.
     
  12. Icy1007 macrumors 6502a

    Icy1007

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    #12
    Wirelessly posted (iPhone 4: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

    If someone got tricked by those obviously fake websites and got infected by the MacDefender malware, they deserve what they got. The same goes for PC users who get tricked by the same tactics.
     
  13. Genocide macrumors member

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    #13
    Yes, and do you expect every user to know these safe computing practices? I am simply saying that you can only benefit from having an anti-security program installed upon your computer. Relying on your own detection skills, which inevitably will fail after numerous times as humans do make mistakes. Albeit no anti-virus program is foolproof, the level of security it provides to a computer is a better guaranteed defence than the user's safe computing practices.

    Though combined, safe computing practices and an anti-virus program will provide better security for your computer than either can provide on their own.

    Also, I do not feel as if I am embarrassing myself to anyone as I am engaging in a debate. Expressing one's own opinion's should not lead to embarrassment, and if I do feel that I am wrong I do not feel ashamed to do so, though this is not the case.
     
  14. deadwulfe, Jun 29, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2011

    deadwulfe macrumors 6502a

    deadwulfe

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    #14
    I think advising people to be paying for something they don't need (and don't use yourself, which means you have no experience with), to give them a false sense of security for something they'll think they'll never need to know about, because of said paid-for-product, is poor advice. I'd probably even consider it bad advice.

    Imagine a scenario where someone (with an aversion to learning about computers, because they're used to a world without them) has anti-virus software installed on their Mac. Since they haven't ran into any malware, they don't know what happens when or if the app will even do when it does find malware. Mac Defender pops up, saying a virus is detected! Pay some money for the upgraded version of whatever anti-virus to remove it. Hmm, kind of lame to have to pay twice for it, but I guess I will to remove this virus. I mean, it must be the anti-virus telling me about this, right? Because I have it installed when Genocide told me I can only benefit from it!
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #15
    Of course not. That's why when they ask, as the OP did, I provide them with information so they will know safe computing practices. If I just recommend using an antivirus app, they still wouldn't understand how to responsibly protect themselves by prudent user actions.
    Not necessarily. Besides the false sense of security, the AV app will consume system resources with no meaningful benefit, leaving less available for needed apps.
    You don't need "detection skills". You simply need to avoid known sources of malware, namely torrented and pirated apps, apps that try to install themselves without your permission, and apps from unknown/untrusted sites.
     
  16. Icy1007 macrumors 6502a

    Icy1007

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    #16
    Wirelessly posted (iPhone 4: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

    No antivirus program will protect a user if they deliberately choose to install an infected application. Antivirus is pointless on a Mac. Since all Mac malware requires the user to manually run. No antivirus program can't protect the computer from stupid users.
     
  17. Genocide, Jun 29, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2011

    Genocide macrumors member

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    #17
    I have used multiple anti-virus programs on my Mac and Window's computers, though I do not at this time. Therefore I do have experience with these programs. Also, this is not a "false sense of security" as these programs DO work well and DO prevent the user from downloading most infectious files. This happens by warning the user of a potentially malicious file that is requesting download. Of course a user should have already recognized this, though on the off chance they didn't the anti-virus software prompts them.

    The best defence is a combination of safe computing practices and an anti virus software. Neither are infallible but together they make a strong defence.
     
  18. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #18
    No, they don't prevent downloading infected files. They can sometimes alert you once a file is downloaded, but they can't prevent the download. Also, as you could have seen form the MacDefender experience, no antivirus was able to protect against that threat when it surfaced, but users employing safe computing practices were not affected.
     
  19. Genocide macrumors member

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    #19
    Personally I feel it is ignorant to think that the user themselves can prevent all malicious software that threatens their computer. Humans are not perfect, therefore neither is this method. Nor am I saying that an anti-virus program is perfect either. But it is untrue to say that the combination of anti-virus software and practicing safe computing methods is less effective at preventing attacks than using only one of these methods.

    Also, stating that the anti-virus software uses up computer resources is true yet this is a nominal amount considering computers have numerous programs running constantly. Also, the benefit they provide to the computer's security outweighs the resources required to run these.


    This is my final response as I think we have both discussed this issue to the near end and don't seem anywhere close to reaching an agreement :p. Good debate.
     
  20. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #20
    Users don't have to be perfect to effectively avoid all Mac OS X malware that exists in the wild. All they have to do is be careful what software they choose to install, and its source, and not install anything else. That's it. Simple.
    Antivirus software adds no extra protection that safe computing practices won't already provide. Therefore, it is not necessary. If someone wants to run it, that's their choice, but I'd rather educate users about how to protect themselves, rather than place their trust in an app that won't protect them as well as they can protect themselves. Practicing safe computing is the highest protection available for Mac OS X. Antivirus software is a poor substitute.
     
  21. deadwulfe macrumors 6502a

    deadwulfe

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    Feb 18, 2010
    #21
    Eh, I think his Mac Virus/Malware Info link makes a good argument against anti-virus software having any benefit at all.

    Without any viruses, how would software vendors even know how to set up a heuristics scan for catching unknown viruses? They can base it on Windows viruses, but what good does that do for a completely different OS? Even though the software's intended purpose is a benefit, there is still no evidence that it even adds any benefit to the user before the malicious software has already infected hundreds/thousands of users.
     
  22. Glockcubed macrumors member

    Glockcubed

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    May 24, 2011
    #22
    I am new to Mac and had the same question. Called support and they said that Apple could not suggest an Anti-Virus. However, since Mac is becoming more popular, it is just a matter of time before the virus will come. I have been very happy with Kaspersky on my PC's. That is what I have protecting my MBP. BTW, I still have a 21 second start up time with Kaspersky running.;)
     
  23. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #23
    They've been saying that for years. Macs already ARE more popular, with a larger installed base and more market share than ever before. We're still waiting. The market share theory simply doesn't hold water.
     
  24. simsaladimbamba

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    located
    #24
    The Mac OS X Malware Myth Continues
    Btw, there have been viruses in the 90s for Mac OS (7 and 8), when Mac OS was less popular then it is today, thus this market share myth is just that, a myth, full of crap.
     
  25. Glockcubed macrumors member

    Glockcubed

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    May 24, 2011
    #25
    I agree with the market share theory being a load of crap. But for 52.99, I felt that was a pretty good investment for me. You just never know.
     

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