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Magazine Industry Already Preparing for Possible Apple Tablet

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Ad Age reports that the print industry is not sitting idly by while it becomes increasingly obvious that Apple is planning to enter the tablet market. In fact, these traditional publishers are worried that Apple may quickly dominate the industry in the same way they dominated the music industry with iTunes and the iPod.

As a result, publishers are discussing the creation of an industry-wide digital storefront to allow customers to purchase digital content and subscriptions in an effort to bypass whatever solution Apple might provide.
It's true that magazine and newspaper publishers are eager to sell digital editions tailored for the tablet and other devices -- but they're just as determined to prevent Apple from getting between them and their readers along the way.
These concerns don't appear to be unfounded, as reports have described Apple's plans as "redefining" print media. Sources within The New York Times claim that Apple has already approached the newspaper regarding plans to distribute its content on a "new device".

Article Link: Magazine Industry Already Preparing for Possible Apple Tablet
 

davidwarren

macrumors 6502a
Aug 28, 2007
782
2
hum, I imagine apple would require them to use the itunes store, and just make their store inaccessible from the device. I would welcome the competing storefront if it meant lower prices for consumers.
 
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iOrlando

macrumors 68000
Jul 20, 2008
1,811
1
You fight for your papers? Keep them! You fight for your bank account? She will be wealthier and more powerful than ever before! You fight for you readership? You will be proclaimed warlord of all paper, answerable only to the one true master of the world! NYT, your victory will be complete if you but lay down your arms, and kneel to holy Jobs.
 
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mobi

macrumors 6502
Jul 26, 2004
407
15
Penn's Woods
Traditional publishers wake the hell up! It is 2009 and they have been floundering for years. If they couldn't figure out how to make the shift, let Apple show them the way.
 
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-hh

macrumors 68030
Jul 17, 2001
2,528
324
NJ Highlands, Earth
Resistance is ... interesting

This is an interesting report, since what it is suggesting is that Apple has made a "Kindle-esque" tablet device, but with the distinction that it is integrated into the iTunes Store ...

... the potential is clear: the consumer signs up (buys) various weekly/monthly magazine subscriptions (eventually: daily Newspaper), which are simple "PodCast" -like downloads onto the device.

From the AT&T angle, one would expect that this would more likely be default as WiFi instead of 3G (current cost of bandwidth), but in either case, it would be capable of being synched either directly, and/or to a home desktop computer (preferably Mac).


What makes this interesting is the resistance to it by the potential content providers - - particularly because this is a competitive business: all it takes is for one of the weaker (or "more in trouble") publishers to agree, and it is going to be hard to resist.

Personally, I see & expect that the traditional Publishers will try to keep control by trying to keep their e-Publishing in-house.

The problem with this is that they don't have hardware ... and/or they'll have to try to support a bunch of hardware devices ... plus they have to figure out how to encourage the retail consumer to come to their website to buy their product.

Thus, Apple shows up on their doorstep with a turnkey solution .. but at a price.

The hardcopy publishing industry isn't in healthy enough shape to remain a solid & unified front of resistance to Apple. Someone will fold, and then the rest will pragmatically be forced to follow ... it will always be reluctantly, because it wasn't their idea and it wasn't on their terms.

The real question is which publishers will be so opposed that they would rather go out of business than change.


-hh
 
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crees!

macrumors 68000
Jun 14, 2003
1,920
27
MD/VA/DC
So these newspapers already have paper and online versions. Now they're worried Apple is going to cannibalize the portable market? The newspaper companies are not going to be the ones building a device together that they can all distribute content on as that's not their business/business model. You would figure any additional means to get their content out there and receive revenue from it would be welcome; especially in this day and age.
 
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Chaszmyr

macrumors 601
Aug 9, 2002
4,267
85
They're probably smart to be trying this, but ultimately I think it will be bad for consumers if they're successful. Apple isn't just on top of the music selling industry because they offered a solution, it's because they offered the best solution. I would hate to see publishers reject Apple's good ideas and instead go to the market with a half-baked solution of their own.
 
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Sokratesagogo

macrumors member
Mar 4, 2009
42
5
Cambridge, UK
Fight the powers that be G!

More power to Apple

To probably horribly mispell,misquote and marmalise Public Enemy:

Right on, c'mon
What we got to say
Power to the people no delay
To make everybody see
In order to fight the powers that be


Fight the pow-errrr!
 
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iSee

macrumors 68040
Oct 25, 2004
3,527
253
Publishers have always relied on distribution partners to get their products in front of customer eyeballs. I don't think their goal should be to shut Apple out. They do want to make sure there are viable competitors, though, to ensure Apple doesn't get a stranglehold on their electronic distribution.

That said, I doubt an industry consortium will be able to compete with Apple on something so dependent on the user experience like a storefront would be.

They need to make sure not to sign exclusive deals with Apple or others -- then they'll all be all right. Those deals always look good (lucrative) in the short term, but end up either (1) fragmenting the market if each publisher has exclusive deals with different distribution partners -- which constrains the entire market, keeping it small; or (2) making a single distributor too dominant if the distributor gets too many exclusive deals from the major publishers.

If a distributor becomes dominant without exclusive deals (as Apple did in the music business), it's because they provide a superior service. That's not a great position for the publishers, because they want to maintain control, but it is better than the alternative: not selling all the content the distributor sold for them.
 
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barkomatic

macrumors 601
Aug 8, 2008
4,153
1,950
Manhattan
Traditional publishers wake the hell up! It is 2009 and they have been floundering for years. If they couldn't figure out how to make the shift, let Apple show them the way.

The article states they have indeed awakened. They are trying to create a universal standard that Apple will have to use--along with competing devices. This is actually a good thing, since we don't want too much popular media controlled by one company.

What if one of these publishers decided to run a story that Apple didn't like? Apple could pull that newspaper from iTunes if it wanted. If newspapers and magazines truly switch to digital only--that would effectively cut off that peridodical from the entire group of people using it.
 
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str1f3

macrumors 68000
Aug 24, 2008
1,859
0
This is laughable. It is already too late. They will have to do anything Apple says and like it. They have no leverage. The industry is already in shambles.
 
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felt.

macrumors 6502a
Mar 13, 2008
698
222
Canada
tyrese sure did an amazing job on the first digital release for a comic book (mayhem @ itunes store) I'm ready for print media to die :apple:
 
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Clive At Five

macrumors 65816
May 26, 2004
1,438
0
St. Paul, MN
The reason people starting using iTunes is because it was an excellent jukebox that synced with an excellent portable media player. The music service grew out of that.

Before iDistribution can be successful, Apple has to prove to "the people" that they have a dependable, convenient model.

On the other side of things, as far as the news-print industry is concerned, they have neither the distribution infrastructure nor the related hardware to push digital distribution on their own.

Fact of the matter is, they need companies like Apple and Amazon (Kindle) - who have both - to move their old-fashioned and dying business model towards something more modern.

-Clive
 
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CapturedDarknes

macrumors newbie
Sep 24, 2009
13
0
Amen!

Traditional publishers wake the hell up! It is 2009 and they have been floundering for years. If they couldn't figure out how to make the shift, let Apple show them the way.

Definitely, the newspapers have tried to sell digital subscriptions for the last 4-5 years, if they can't do it, let a company with a huge market share of digital media subscriptions and sales do it for you. Period.
 
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DipDog3

macrumors 65816
Sep 20, 2002
1,184
679
https://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogodarkd.png

Ad Age reports that the print industry is not sitting idly by while it becomes increasingly obvious that Apple is planning to enter the tablet market. In fact, these traditional publishers are worried that Apple may quickly dominate the industry in the same way they dominated the music industry with iTunes and the iPod.

As a result, publishers are discussing the creation of an industry-wide digital storefront to allow customers to purchase digital content and subscriptions in an effort to bypass whatever solution Apple might provide.These concerns don't appear to be unfounded, as reports have described Apple's plans as "redefining" print media. Sources within The New York Times claim that Apple has already approached the newspaper regarding plans to distribute its content on a "new device".

Article Link: Magazine Industry Already Preparing for Possible Apple Tablet

They will either adapt or die.
 
Comment

sishaw

macrumors 65816
Jan 12, 2005
1,147
19
They're probably smart to be trying this, but ultimately I think it will be bad for consumers if they're successful. Apple isn't just on top of the music selling industry because they offered a solution, it's because they offered the best solution. I would hate to see publishers reject Apple's good ideas and instead go to the market with a half-baked solution of their own.

Well, that's where market forces will work. If the industry's ideas are "half-baked," people won't buy them and Apple will get its opening. If, on the other hand, the threat of Apple forces the industry to come up with some better solutions, so much the better for consumers. I say: bring it on and let the best product win!
 
Comment

irishgrizzly

macrumors 65816
May 15, 2006
1,461
1
They need to make sure not to sign exclusive deals with Apple or others -- then they'll all be all right. Those deals always look good (lucrative) in the short term, but end up either (1) fragmenting the market if each publisher has exclusive deals with different distribution partners -- which constrains the entire market, keeping it small; or (2) making a single distributor too dominant if the distributor gets too many exclusive deals from the major publishers.

Good points. Instead of signing any exclusive deal with Apple the publishing industry should band together and come up with a set pricing structure that they sell to many different storefront platforms (eg. iTunes, Amazon).
 
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babyj

macrumors 6502a
Aug 29, 2006
586
8
I find it amazing that the newspaper and magazine industry seem intent on copying the music industry and make a complete hash of selling content online.

They currently make close to nothing from selling content online and haven't got a single revenue model that is ever likely to work. Along come Apple who will no doubt create a new standard file format, offer access to an online shop with over 50m potential customers and handle all distribution and sales aspects for a reasonable 30% cut. All of which will lead to massive sales, yet they seem ready to oppose it.

There seems to be this built in concept of Apple being bad across the entire media industry. They don't have a good reason for Apple being bad, they just are. Trying to oppose Apple will be just as successful as the music industry working against iTunes.
 
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dXTC

macrumors 68020
Oct 30, 2006
2,033
50
Up, up in my studio, studio
More power to Apple

To probably horribly mispell,misquote and marmalise Public Enemy:

Right on, c'mon
What we got to say
Power to the people no delay
To make everybody see
In order to fight the powers that be


Fight the pow-errrr!

Yo, drop the rhyme in overtime, G! Yeaaaaah, booooyieeee! :p

(sorry everyone, just had to)
 
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Vulpinemac

macrumors 6502a
Nov 6, 2007
677
0
Anybody ever hear of William Randolph Hearst?

What he did to the newspaper industry at the turn of the 20th Century could well be considered shameful... but it sold newspapers and made an Empire of his name. The name still stands as one of the biggest in national media. It appears that Steve Jobs and Apple, Inc. are becoming the Hearst of the 21st Century.
 
Comment

Sol

macrumors 68000
Jan 14, 2003
1,564
6
Australia
I think the print publishers are being a bit reactionary by uniting against Apple like this. Seems like a collected effort to bargain for a better deal than Apple is likely to be offering now. Publishers know there is demand for a colour electronic book or tablet from Apple and want their content on it. Ultimately if traditional newspaper and magazines do not sell their content on iTunes then new players like Salon and The Huffington Post would be happy to fill the void.
 
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Takeo

macrumors 6502a
Nov 10, 2004
667
246
Canada
How is this different from the web? Other than the fact that they would make you pay for it... and there would presumably be no banner ads? Would the pages not scroll? Everything on one screen with pagination and multi-touch page flipping? Does that make a difference to people compared to scrolling pages? I don't understand why I would pay for a tablet to read a magazine when they already have websites. Exclusive content maybe? The Kindle makes more sense as a reader because a) it uses eInk and b) it's focus is books, novels, textbooks... content that's not already available on the web. If it was a full color eInk device... that would be pretty great. Otherwise... I don't get the business model.
 
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