maintenance scripts - with blank password

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by spunklemonkey, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. spunklemonkey macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    #1
    Ive tried running:

    sudo sh /etc/monthly

    etc

    But since I have a blank password for my user account (dont say this is silly since for me account pass is pointless) it doesnt seem to do anything in the terminal? Will it not run without a password? It askes for one, since its blank I just press enter and then nothing happens, it just says the default line:

    rsimac:~ rs$ sudo sh/etc/monthly

    WARNING: Improper use of the sudo command could lead to data loss
    or the deletion of important system files. Please double-check your
    typing when using sudo. Type "man sudo" for more information.

    To proceed, enter your password, or type Ctrl-C to abort.

    Password:
    rsimac:~ rs$
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    That is silly. It's your first and last defense for security. But anyway..

    You need to have a password to use sudo. I suggest you create another admin account and su to it to run periodic scripts.

    oh.. and it should be used thusly:

    sudo periodic monthly

    Check out the periodic man page.
     
  3. spunklemonkey thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    #3
    So how would a password on my user account stop a hacker exactly? Out of interest. I never used to have one on windows, seems to me its a waste of time. I put one on to do the scripts. but I would have one if there's any point, but is there really? I mean I doubt its going to stop any internet hacking for instance or is it?

    Anyway thanks for info
     
  4. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #4
    To be honest, I don't want to rehash that which has been well covered.

    If someone physically stole your computer, they have instant access to everything. Where you've surfed, passwords stored in your keychain, personal information, etc.
    If someone were to get your username, they instantly have complete admin control over your Mac remotely. Again, where you've surfed, passwords stored in your keychain, personal information, etc.
    I don't think Microsoft's lack of security model has worked very well for them.. It's a good practice to get into, basics of security. The world is getting more complex and it's good to be informed.
    Finally, you're clearly into using the command line. You should get into best practices too.

    Of course it will. Simply having a password means that a "hacker" has to work to get into/use your computer for nefarious purposes. Most likely via exploits in software, or spending time trying to break your bad password. Beyond that, having a password (particularly a GOOD password) would encourage someone to move onto easier & green pastures for exploit.. like perhaps a Windows box with no admin password? ;)
     
  5. spunklemonkey thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    #5
    hmm well I suppose its just a good idea to use one. Ill keep my password on then just to be on the safe side. Consider my converted over! :D
     

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