Major iMac Surgery Gone Wrong

Discussion in 'iMac' started by rayward, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. rayward macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #1
    I just completed a replacement of my Mac's innards, including an upgraded HDD, a new SSD and a BD drive in place of the SuperDrive. And now my Mac is dead. It won't react to the power button at all.

    Swapping out the HDD and the optical drives was easy. However, adding the SSD was tough because the 3rd SATA port is on the backside of the motherboard and a bitch to get to. Having said that, I got everything connected up as prescribed, and everything fit back together (without any bits left over).

    I know this is a bit of a long shot but...has anyone else had a similar experience after opening up their iMac? It's either some forehead-slappingly obvious screw-up by yours truly, or I've done some damage while rooting around in there that will need professional help to fix.

    TIA.
     
  2. rkaufmann87 macrumors 68000

    rkaufmann87

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Location:
    Folsom, CA
    #2
    Chances are you did not connect something up. When you say it's "dead" do you mean no sounds or video at all? If so that means the power supply may be kaput.

    To be honest this is exactly why it should be taken to a professional to have these upgrades done. It's still not too late to take it to an AASP and they can help bail you out.
     
  3. Significant1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2014
    #3
    My guess, is the bd-drive causing the problems. Apple does not seem to use standard pin-layout for the optical drive. That is my experience with a similar problem. Put back the super-drive and see, if that solves your problem.
     
  4. rayward thread starter macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #4
    Thanks for your replies. It's totally dead, unresponsive. I'm going to crack it open again and see what I can see - and swap out the BD drive.

    After all what more harm can I do...
     
  5. Significant1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2014
    #5
    So was mine. I tried connecting an ssd with an ordinary 22pin SATA til 13pin Slimline SATA adapter. After I switched back to superdrive, everything was working again. I was then told by an Mac technician, that the wiring was non standard and I would need to use a hd-caddy, which he sent me. It worked..
     
  6. N2bnfunn macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
    #6
    You need to do this, it may sound stupid but sometimes when you replaced parts in a IMac it will NOT BOOT... keep pushing and holding down the power button, it is will boot up..
     
  7. Brian Y macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    #7
    Be careful upon re-opening it. Give it a fair while after having it plugged in, it might not be draining the PSU when pressing the power button and you could give yourself a nasty shock.

    Things to check:

    - Make sure all cables (back and front) are in.
    - Make sure RAM is seated properly.
    - Make sure graphics card is seated properly.
    - Make sure MLB isn't bent.
    - Make sure all cables are in again. Unplug and replug all of them.

    What diagnostic LEDs are on? On some models (can't remember which) the diagnostic LEDs are only readable with the display off, which means powering the machine on with the display off. Sometimes they're readable from the vent next to the RAM slots. If you do this, you have an exposed, 240v PSU with the ability to kill you, or give you a VERY nasty shock. Be careful.
     
  8. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #8
    Well.... not all "major surgeries" are successful.

    Just sayin'...
     
  9. rayward thread starter macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #9
    Opened it back up and checked all the cables as best I could - saw nothing wrong.

    Put the SuperDrive back in, closed it up and tried to boot - holding the power button for a good lone while (over a minute) - nothing doing.

    Taking it in for someone who knows what they're doing to have a look.

    Thanks to all for your efforts at helping me out here. I'll let you know what I screwed up once I'm told.
     
  10. antman2x2 macrumors 6502a

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    Mar 1, 2011
    Location:
    New YAWK
    #10
    Yeah keep us posted!
     
  11. rayward thread starter macrumors 68000

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    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #11
    MicroCenter has narrowed it down to the power supply or the logic board. They are putting in a new power unit and I'm keeping my fingers crossed that that's it.
     
  12. toddzrx macrumors 6502a

    toddzrx

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    #12
    Whatever dude. I've taken apart just about every Apple product I've ever bought, replaced parts, and never had any problems. I'm not specially trained; I just bought the right tools, referenced iFixit or YouTube videos, and took my time. You may not be comfortable taking electronics apart, but other people are.

    If you ask me, an older computer that can benefit from new components like an SSD is a GREAT reason to dive in and try a DIY. You might actually learn something and do it right! :rolleyes:
     
  13. rkaufmann87 macrumors 68000

    rkaufmann87

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    Dec 17, 2009
    Location:
    Folsom, CA
    #13
    Well good for you sport!
     
  14. rayward thread starter macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #14
    What Was Wrong

    There was a loose wire on the logic board that was shorting it out. It took MicroCenter a little while to find it, but they did. Now everything is up and running, both drives installed and even the BD optical drive is working.

    Cost $80. Worth every penny.

    Now if only I can figure out how to get the SSD and HDD to work together as a fusion drive...
     
  15. rkaufmann87 macrumors 68000

    rkaufmann87

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Location:
    Folsom, CA
    #15
    Excellent, money well spent and now you have a completed project.
     
  16. Yakibomb macrumors 6502

    Yakibomb

    Joined:
    May 13, 2014
    Location:
    Cape Town
    #16
    I have yet to do it, but i've had this page bookmarked for the day I do: LINK
     
  17. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Location:
    Between the coasts
    #17
    I've done my share of electronics repair (audio, broadcast, and PC) on a professional level. Having seen a fair amount of "oops!" among the ranks of my colleagues (and myself), I'd think thrice before recommending that anyone crack open an electronic device that was not built with end-user service in mind. It's hard to assess the skills and aptitudes of others, and I've seen way too many examples of people getting in over their heads, whether it be car repair, electronics, home plumbing and electrical... Mistakes will be made. Screwdrivers will slip, the heat of a soldering iron can lift circuit board traces, connector pins get bent, a static discharge zaps a chip... Repair is a skill that requires practice and experience. Murphy's Law prevails.

    iFixit is a wonderful resource - among other things, it's helped me take an old PowerBook down to bare metal several times, adding years to its life (and along the way, I learned the local Mac shop had managed to lose a fair number of screws in the course of earlier repairs). But despite my experience, I view some of those iFixit guides and think, "No, not me. It's too easy to mess up some of those steps." If I was ever tempted, my first try on a smart phone would be on a unit I wouldn't mind trashing, the same way surgeons practice on cadavers and simulators. As they say, "First, do no harm."
     
  18. apolloa macrumors G3

    apolloa

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    Time, because it rules EVERYTHING!
    #18
    I can happily strip a computer down to all it's bit, but I worked in IT for about 8 years.
    Would I suggest anyone do it? Hmm, if you feel confident enough then yes, just use guides off the internet and be VERY careful, always check for things getting trapped as you go along, take photos also so you know how to put it back together.
    But it can save you a fair few $$$ to fix or upgrade a computer yourself.

    The only problem with the iMac these day's is getting into the thing! I would rather have a thicker computer held together with screws as opposed to some micro thin one using glue. But I would give it a go personally, not sure if I would advise a novice to though...
     

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