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bigpoppamac31

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Aug 16, 2007
2,452
432
Canada
Why was my reply deleted? I'm just trying to get an answer to my problem. With over 1500 views how does no one have a solution?
 

kohlson

macrumors 68020
Apr 23, 2010
2,425
736
- With over 1500 views how does no one have a solution?
OK, I'll respond. I was one of those views. The subject intrigued me - make video clips with VLC? Huh, wonder what that's about. Like many people on the forum, I am always looking for new approaches to things I do all the time, and while VLC is part of my video app toolkit, I don't use it for that. On viewing the post, I saw nothing to add. I can't tell you if the other 1499 thought this way, but that was my thinking.
 

bigpoppamac31

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Aug 16, 2007
2,452
432
Canada
Why the Advanced controls aren't there can be found at Advanced controls option in Mac
Info: How to trim/cut clips with VLC

Your attempted links don't work. Please try again.

- With over 1500 views how does no one have a solution?
OK, I'll respond. I was one of those views. The subject intrigued me - make video clips with VLC? Huh, wonder what that's about. Like many people on the forum, I am always looking for new approaches to things I do all the time, and while VLC is part of my video app toolkit, I don't use it for that. On viewing the post, I saw nothing to add. I can't tell you if the other 1499 thought this way, but that was my thinking.

Well it just seemed kind of odd seeing as VLC is pretty popular that no Mac user has used this feature. Unless this feature is not on the Mac version but I know it is. I have done it before with a previous version. I just can recall how to do it.
 

ColdCase

macrumors 68040
Feb 10, 2008
3,363
276
NH
I use FCPX, but iMovie also works OK for clips. Sometimes just QuickTime is adequate. I stopped trying to save a nickel by spending hours of my time with free apps while still ending up with substandard work years ago. But there are more clever folks than me that should chime in here soon... :)

That being said, there are some very good free tools for the toolbox, handbrake, subler., makeMKV.. VLC can display a wide variety of video source files.
 

bigpoppamac31

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Aug 16, 2007
2,452
432
Canada
I use FCPX, but iMovie also works OK for clips. Sometimes just QuickTime is adequate. I stopped trying to save a nickel by spending hours of my time with free apps while still ending up with substandard work years ago. But there are more clever folks than me that should chime in here soon... :)

That being said, there are some very good free tools for the toolbox, handbrake, subler., makeMKV.. VLC can display a wide variety of video source files.

Hmm okay. The Quicktime clip editor seems awkward. But maybe it's caused I've never used it before. I guess it would make sense to make a duplicate of the original video file so I don't ruin it. But I don't know the difference between "split clip" and "trim". But also QT doesn't play mkv files which are the files I want to make clips from and piece together. Handbrake I've always found confusing and I've never used any of the other ones.
 

Gwendolini

macrumors 6502a
Feb 5, 2015
589
127
random
MPEG Streamclip (www.squared5.com - still working, just not in development anymore as it seems) can open MKV files with the help of Perian (www.perian.org - still working, just not in development anymore) and then you can make IN and OUT points to create new, shorter clips and save them in whatever format you desire, but as far as I have experienced, does it involve transcoding and not remuxing, thus will take longer.

There is also the VideoContainerSwitcher from MacRumors Forums member "floh", which allows you to mux the MKV to an MP4 or a MOV file, which makes it easier to open them in QuickTime or even iMovie or LightWorks or other tools.
 

MacBH928

macrumors G3
May 17, 2008
8,364
3,740
MPEG Streamclip (www.squared5.com - still working, just not in development anymore as it seems) can open MKV files with the help of Perian (www.perian.org - still working, just not in development anymore) and then you can make IN and OUT points to create new, shorter clips and save them in whatever format you desire, but as far as I have experienced, does it involve transcoding and not remuxing, thus will take longer.

There is also the VideoContainerSwitcher from MacRumors Forums member "floh", which allows you to mux the MKV to an MP4 or a MOV file, which makes it easier to open them in QuickTime or even iMovie or LightWorks or other tools.

why they keep juggling between .mkv , mp4, and mov (is this still used today?) ? Why can't it be like images where Jpegs, gifs, and PNG are supports by 99% of image editors?
 

Gwendolini

macrumors 6502a
Feb 5, 2015
589
127
random
why they keep juggling between .mkv , mp4, and mov (is this still used today?) ? Why can't it be like images where Jpegs, gifs, and PNG are supports by 99% of image editors?
Because they have different purposes.

.mov files are still around, plenty of video professionals use them to store ProRes material in.
.mp4 files are probably the most known format out there, being provided by cameras and many hour sources.
.mkv files are just "better" than .mp4 files, as they offer more streams inside compared to .mp4s. Something like that.

And it is a lot harder to support video extensions than it looks, as the codec used inside that extension (container) is not easily visible upon first look.
 

MacBH928

macrumors G3
May 17, 2008
8,364
3,740
Because they have different purposes.

.mov files are still around, plenty of video professionals use them to store ProRes material in.
.mp4 files are probably the most known format out there, being provided by cameras and many hour sources.
.mkv files are just "better" than .mp4 files, as they offer more streams inside compared to .mp4s. Something like that.

And it is a lot harder to support video extensions than it looks, as the codec used inside that extension (container) is not easily visible upon first look.

why not just use one of them for everything as the standard?
 

ColdCase

macrumors 68040
Feb 10, 2008
3,363
276
NH
One shoe size does not fit all applications well. Fitting Video into distribution channels is much much more complex than images. Many compromises.
 

Gwendolini

macrumors 6502a
Feb 5, 2015
589
127
random
why not just use one of them for everything as the standard?
That would be fine by me and many others, but different formats offer different capabilities, sadly a format offering all capabilities will not offer them sufficiently well.

It's like with all the different kinds of tapes and optical media from the past. Why one standard when several bring in more money?
 

MacBH928

macrumors G3
May 17, 2008
8,364
3,740
That would be fine by me and many others, but different formats offer different capabilities, sadly a format offering all capabilities will not offer them sufficiently well.

It's like with all the different kinds of tapes and optical media from the past. Why one standard when several bring in more money?

I don't understand much in video, but all I understand is the lossy(compressed) and lossless. Otherwise all videos look the same to me, and give you headache when using different players as some won't play, some will stutter, some just audio, and some video with no audio. Whats the advantage in that?!
 

Gwendolini

macrumors 6502a
Feb 5, 2015
589
127
random
I don't understand much in video, but all I understand is the lossy(compressed) and lossless. Otherwise all videos look the same to me, and give you headache when using different players as some won't play, some will stutter, some just audio, and some video with no audio. Whats the advantage in that?!
You only see, what is being delivered to you, and that is most of the time compressed video and audio encapsulated in a format of the distributor's liking. You have to ask the distributor, why it chose .mp4 or .mkv or .rm or .avi (the last one still being around, sadly, the second the last probably dead since forever).

As mentioned before, different formats offer different possibilities, even ones with DRM involved or multiple audio tracks and subtitle tracks. Maybe all those files will be a thing of the past once streaming becomes more ubiquitous. But there will probably just plenty of stream formats then, like Amazon Prime only showing SD when there is no HDCP display device connected or some ******** like that.

I can live with the various formats, VLC plays all of the ones I encounter, and HandBrake does convert the ones I do want as .mp4 or .mkv (my preferred container).

Maybe read up on the different formats on Wikipedia and get an understanding, what each of the offers and what each of them does not offer.
 
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MacBH928

macrumors G3
May 17, 2008
8,364
3,740
You only see, what is being delivered to you, and that is most of the time compressed video and audio encapsulated in a format of the distributor's liking. You have to ask the distributor, why it chose .mp4 or .mkv or .rm or .avi (the last one still being around, sadly, the second the last probably dead since forever).

As mentioned before, different formats offer different possibilities, even ones with DRM involved or multiple audio tracks and subtitle tracks. Maybe all those files will be a thing of the past once streaming becomes more ubiquitous. But there will probably just plenty of stream formats then, like Amazon Prime only showing SD when there is no HDCP display device connected or some ******** like that.

I can live with the various formats, VLC plays all of the ones I encounter, and HandBrake does convert the ones I do want as .mp4 or .mkv (my preferred container).

Maybe read up on the different formats on Wikipedia and get an understanding, what each of the offers and what each of them does not offer.

thanks for clearing this up
 
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