Making a Promotional Video...

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by acearchie, Mar 27, 2010.

  1. acearchie macrumors 68040

    acearchie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #1
    So I have been tasked by my friends dad to make a promo for his business. They specialise in timber-framing.

    I will be getting paid for the job so I have to take it seriously.

    I am not very familiar with what you would want to get from a promo video so if anyone has any links to share they would be very helpful!

    If anyone has any tips on things to do, look out for etc. then they would be much appreciated.

    The kit I will be using is my Panasonic HDC TM300 with a wide angle lens and then edited and retouched in After Effects and Final Cut.

    I realise the main thing is to ensure that I do what the client wants and maybe when I have a clearer brief I will post it here to see if anyone can help me.

    Thanks guys.
     
  2. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #2
    Is there a script? If not, who will be developing the script - you or the client?

    If it's the client, then you simply follow the script like a builder would follow a set of blueprints.

    But if it's up to you to develop the script, talk to the client to find out exactly what (and how) he wants to promote. What does he want the viewer to think, see and feel after they've viewed the promo. From that information, you should be able to at least develop an outline or draft and begin formulating how you can shoot and edit to achieve that goal.

    -DH
     
  3. matteusclement macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #3
    talk to the customer

    I often find that the customer has no idea what they want. I try to find this out one of two ways:

    1. sit down with them with some youtube videos you found (or vimeo) and see what they like and hate. This is tricky as you can get sucked into doing some ****** effect that you think is totally lame and the customer this is "cool".

    2. Start shooting and throw something together for a beta run. This is dangerous as you have to make it crystal clear that it's a beta. This doesn't give you permission to make an absolute piece of junk, it just means that you used the first few clips you got.

    I'm not a pro, but these have worked for me in the past.

    Oh, and for the love of god, especially since it's your buddies dad, GET EVERYTHING IN WRITING. Don't go into this blind as it could turn into a 6 month project.

    Also, what is the final output? DVD, Youtube, ipod... this will make a difference on what works for your composition and shooting.

    AND, make back ups of your work... serveral if you can.

    PLUS, keep the work for 3 months incase he wants to make an edit or add something... of course you would charge for that. (get it in writing)

    I might think of more later....
     
  4. matteusclement macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #4
    oh, and the thing about doing #1 (looking at others) is you can gauge the level of quality the customer is expecting. If you see a video that you KNOW you have no chance in hell of making due to experience, DONT take the job.
     
  5. Gator24765 macrumors 6502a

    Gator24765

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Location:
    Texas
    #5
    I create promotional videos for sports teams and when i need an idea i just browse around on youtube. I dont copy the ideas frame for frame but it just gives me inspiration on what to do.
     
  6. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Canada, eh?
    #6
    Find out who the competitors are, and watch their promotional videos. This will give you an idea of what clients are expecting to see, as well as ideas about what points you may want to make. You might discover that your company does something special that the other ones don't, so you would talk that point up a bit more. Obviously don't clone the competitor's videos, but this should give you a rough idea.

    At its most basic, a promo video says "Hey! We exist!" Beyond that, you may or may not take it in different directions including who you are, the history of the company, what products or services you provide, why you are different from everyone else (the patented process X which only your company knows how to do), what satisfied clients think, how the product works, how to get in touch.
     
  7. acearchie thread starter macrumors 68040

    acearchie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #7
    Thanks everyone for the tips! They are all very useful. However, I have found out today that it is just footage that the client wants as another company will be doing the edit aswell as some other things associated with the website.

    Personally I find this a bit odd as as I am collecting footage I am conciously thnking about the edit!

    I realise I can't really ask on tips for filming as none of you know the business but I thought I would chuck in a collection of close ups/wide angles and time lapses to hopefully cover all basis!
     
  8. matteusclement macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #8
    that's weird, I don't know how I would feel about that...
     
  9. Richardthe4th macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Location:
    Below Sealevel
    #9
    if an other company will do editing, finishing/post/outputting, it is even more important that you talk to that company to get to know what they want and expect; and, let them put it on paper. if the result is not good (it is not what the customer wants, the dad of your friend...) it is all to easy to point to the shooter (you, the friend of etc...)

    this is likely to give embarrasing situations! especially since you are not a pro with miles of experience and a trackrecord to counter the pointing at you.

    be very carefull and perhaps share youre doubts with you're friend and his dad. perhaps even not take the job. things like this have cost many friendships.

    good luck!
     

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