Malware help?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Lion (10.7)' started by 76ShovelHead, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. 76ShovelHead macrumors 6502a

    76ShovelHead

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Location:
    Florida
    #1
    I was browsing the internet and got a pop up from Adobe Flash player where it says it blocked the connection from /about/blank to speed.pointroll.com :confused: Am i infected?!?!? help please :eek:

    BTW,

    I right–clicked the /about/blank and tried to "reveal" it in finder but to no avail. Finder just reports that the directory doesn't exist.
     
  2. Soliber macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    #2
    What do you do when you think you have a virus? Install a reputable virus scanner ;-)
    Try the Sophos for Mac, it's free :)
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    The only way you can have malware infecting your Mac is if you installed it yourself.
    No, don't try Sophos. Read on.

    You don't need any 3rd party antivirus software to protect Mac OS X from malware. Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released 10 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided with some basic education, common sense and care in what software you install. Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
    If you insist on running 3rd party antivirus software:
    • ClamXav is a good choice, since it isn't a resource hog, detects both Mac and Windows malware and doesn't run with elevated privileges. You can run scans when you choose, rather than leaving it running all the time, slowing your system.
    • Sophos should be avoided, as it could actually increase your Mac's vulnerability, as described here and here.... and here.
    • iAntiVirus has an inaccurate malware definitions list that includes many items that aren't even malware, so their detection accuracy is untrustworthy. This post will give details.
     
  4. Soliber macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    #4
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the on-access scanning that Sophos does, requires elevated privileges, no?

    Wether or not the OP installed the malware himself is largely irrelevant at this point, he needs to know if there is malware and if so to delete it.
    In my opinion, it can't hurt to have an antivirus that has on-access scanning (apart from the privileges thing apparently); it's not like a virus scanner has a noticeable impact (at least, I don't notice it, nor do the people around me).
    I think it's far too complacent to suggest that virus scanners are completely unnecessary for OS X. Lest we forget, the built-in anti-malware protection OS X provides normally only works if the scanned file is downloaded by Safari.
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    Sophos runs with elevated privileges, but other AV apps can do on-access scanning without elevated privileges. Read the 3rd link I posted about Sophos for more reasons why it's not a good choice.
    The OP would know if they installed something. Their post did not indicate any installation. If that's the case, they don't need to scan. If the OP is running Snow Leopard or Lion, the existing trojans are already blocked by XProtect.
    It's not necessary to have on-access scanning, and yes, it does consume system resources. Whether or not the impact is noticeable varies from one user to another, depending on the demands they place on their system.

    There is simply no Mac OS X malware in the wild that can't be avoided by common sense and a bit of education. I encourage you to read the Mac Virus/Malware Info link I posted for more information, if you haven't already done so.
     
  6. Soliber macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    #6
    I always assumed elevated privileges were necessary *-) I'll check out alternatives then.

    Not necessarily. Plenty of people out there who might have clicked on something without thinking it through; it happens.

    System resources, like money, exist to be spent. If something like a virus scanner places an intolerable toll on the OP's system, his is a special case and he should weigh for himself the pros and cons.

    The same can be said and is being said about Windows. Does that stop us from running virus scanners on Windows boxes?
    Like I said, I find it too complacent to think that a Mac user will be safe if he's careful. **** happens and safety nets are nice :)

    At any rate, the OP now knows how he can proceed. I prefer to keep my virus scanner, no matter what that makes people think of me.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    Installation takes more than clicking on a link. It's pretty obvious when software is being installed. In most cases, the admin password is required, as an additional reminder that software is being installed.
    Unlike Mac OS X, there are true viruses in the wild that can infect Windows systems without the user's knowledge or interaction. For those, AV is required for protection.
    If a Mac user practices safe computing, they will be completely safe. The danger with antivirus software is the possibility of the user having a false sense of security, abandoning safe practices. Since detection rates are less than 100%, that's a recipe for disaster.
    That's certainly your right. Anyone can run a 3rd party AV if they choose to. It's simply not required to keep a Mac safe.
     
  8. 76ShovelHead thread starter macrumors 6502a

    76ShovelHead

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Location:
    Florida
    #8
    Exactly. I ran quite a few antivirus tests with ClamXav and all came up negative in all areas I searched. I know what to and not to authorize on my computer, but I wanted to be extra thorough when personal information such as account details or credit card numbers may be at stake. When adobe popped up with that message it alarmed me to take further action, but the only malware problems I've ever had were on a Windows PC, therefore I didn't know what to use or where to go for help on a Mac, so I came here. :D

    Mind you, I am very literate when it comes to computers, I build them! and got my first mac when I was 4 ("Fat Mac").

    Thanks everyone for the help.
     

Share This Page