Maverick running slow, solutions?

2012Tony2012

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Dec 2, 2012
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After going from Snow Leopard to Maverick, my iMac 2007 + 4GB RAM runs slow, and apps are slow to open, and it seems like the hard drive grinds away regularly.

Is there anything I can do to speed this iMac up?
 

w0lf

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Feb 16, 2013
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4) iMac 2007, impossible to do.

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1) How much do they cost?

2) And how does it plug into my iMac 2007?

3) And won't the iMac 2007 systems I/O limit me?
1) Generally about $0.50 per GB

2)
http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+20-Inch+EMC+2133+and+2210+Hard+Drive+Replacement/1008
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1395521

3) Yes but it'll still be something like 3-4x as fast as your HDD.

4) You can upgrade to 6GB ram.
http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Other World Computing/5300DDR2S6GP/
 

2012Tony2012

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Original poster
Dec 2, 2012
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I have decided NOT to go the SSD path or get more RAM!

So next question... what can I do with current iMac 2007 + 4GB RAM to speed up Maverick? Any hints and tips?

I would go back to Snow Leopard but it no longer gets security updates :(

Any advice what to do in Maverick besides RAM and SDD?
 

Dranix

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Feb 26, 2011
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After going from Snow Leopard to Maverick, my iMac 2007 + 4GB RAM runs slow, and apps are slow to open, and it seems like the hard drive grinds away regularly.

Is there anything I can do to speed this iMac up?
There's the problem: 4GB is simply not enough RAM for Mavericks. Have a look at my current memory status on a nMP under Mavericks:



I have nothing special running, just normal browsing with iTunes in the background.
 
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2012Tony2012

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Dec 2, 2012
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There's the problem: 4GB is simply not enough RAM for Mavericks. Have a look at my current memory status on a nMP under Mavericks:

Image

I have nothing special running, just normal browsing with iTunes in the background.
How come when I check RAM, it says, "2.20GB Free" for example, yet Maverick runs sluggish it seems, and apps take longer to open than Snow Leopard ever did.

I don't understand... because I always have FREE RAM, usually it's around 2.20GB or 1.80GB FREE RAM at the worse even after awhile of using and having some apps open. SO why oh why? Please someone explain that to me? Anyone able to shed some light on this for me?

If it's not a RAM issue, which I can't understand how it could be seeing I always have lots of FREE RAM, what else could I try to solve this slow Maverick issue?

This is my screen, and this is running Maverick for awhile and around 5 apps running, notice I have around 2.2GB FREE RAM:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ij1sgd4s4a80dyn/Screen Shot 2014-04-28 at 11.48.01 am.png
 
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Dranix

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Could you show us the same part of activity monitor as I have when your system gets sluggish?

I think your system can't use file-caches, has to swap a lot etc. As You see I have around 2.4GB of file caches alone.
 

53kyle

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Mar 27, 2012
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Sorry, but there is nothing you can do other than upgrade to an SSD. If money is an issue, I completely understand, but otherwise, why not upgrade to an SSD? Also, 6 GB of RAM is very cheap, so I would recommend that at least.

PS, even though you are only using 1.8 GB of RAM, apps only use so little because they don't have much to take advantage of. When you have more, apps will adjust and take advantage of the boost. The screenshot below is how much I am using with 5 apps open:
 

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2012Tony2012

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Dec 2, 2012
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Could you show us the same part of activity monitor as I have when your system gets sluggish?

I think your system can't use file-caches, has to swap a lot etc. As You see I have around 2.4GB of file caches alone.
I already showed you above. It's sluggish now, even though it says only 1.8GB RAM is being used out of 4GB. Snow Leopard was always smooth and fast for me, but Maverick is sluggish all the time, and opening new apps takes ages and loading videos on websites is slow and sluggish and videos jerky etc. This never happens on Snow Leopard.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ij1sgd4s4a80dyn/Screen Shot 2014-04-28 at 11.48.01 am.png

Any other ideas please what I can do?

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Sorry, but there is nothing you can do other than upgrade to an SSD. If money is an issue, I completely understand, but otherwise, why not upgrade to an SSD? Also, 6 GB of RAM is very cheap, so I would recommend that at least.

PS, even though you are only using 1.8 GB of RAM, apps only use so little because they don't have much to take advantage of. When you have more, apps will adjust and take advantage of the boost. The screenshot below is how much I am using with 5 apps open:
It's no so much money, it's that I am not technical and have NO desire to get technical to install an SSD. If it was just a matter of buying and plug and go that would be ok, but it's not.
 

Dranix

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PS, even though you are only using 1.8 GB of RAM, apps only use so little because they don't have much to take advantage of. When you have more, apps will adjust and take advantage of the boost. The screenshot below is how much I am using with 5 apps open:
Yes it shows that even at 8GB you have very low file cache, some swap in use and a lot of compressed memory. All this slows the system.

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I already showed you above. It's sluggish now, even though it says only 1.8GB RAM is being used out of 4GB. Snow Leopard was always smooth and fast for me, but Maverick is sluggish all the time, and opening new apps takes ages and loading videos on websites is slow and sluggish and videos jerky etc. This never happens on Snow Leopard.
Sorry didn't see the link. And it is like I thought. You have nearly no file cache, already memeory compression starting up and the system forces even the kernel into low memory mode - The kernel alone normally takes around 1.7GB.

So apps and the os try hard to minimise their ram usage, but that comes at the price of reloading much from the slow hd. An ssd could speed that up, but it can't do magic.

Best performance wise would probably using Lion in 32bit mode as that takes a good amount less ram.

But honestly that Mac is now 7 years old - give it rest and replace it. My old MP was from early 2008 and after getting my nMP I never looked back so much faster it is.
 
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2012Tony2012

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Dec 2, 2012
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Yes it shows that even at 8GB you have very low file cache, some swap in use and a lot of compressed memory. All this slows the system.

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Sorry didn't see the link. And it is like I thought. You have nearly no file cache, already memeory compression starting up and the system forces even the kernel into low memory mode - The kernel alone normally takes around 1.7GB.

So apps and the os try hard to minimise their ram usage, but that comes at the price of reloading much from the slow hd. An ssd could speed that up, but it can't do magic.

Best performance wise would probably using Lion in 32bit mode as that takes a good amount less ram.

But honestly that Mac is now 7 years old - give it rest and replace it. My old MP was from early 2008 and after getting my nMP I never looked back so much faster it is.
How can I install Lion in 32 bit mode?
 

KoolAid-Drink

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I'd suggest waiting until 10.9.3 is released, then install it using the combo installer. 10.9.3 may smooth out some of the longstanding sluggishness people has been experiencing with Mavericks. If not, then unfortunately, downgrading to Snow Leopard may be your only option. :(
 

FreakinEurekan

macrumors 68040
Sep 8, 2011
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How can I install Lion in 32 bit mode?
Start by getting back to Snow Leopard. If you have a sequestered backup (that you didn't inherit & continue updating with Mavericks), you can roll back to that. If not, erase the hard drive & reinstall Snow Leopard from DVD, and download the update to 10.6.8

In the meantime, buy Lion for $19.99. That's a code that gets emailed a day or two after you buy, so do that first.

Then redeem the code in the App Store to download & install a Lion.

To run Lion in 32-bit mode, hold down 3 and 2 while booting.

Personally, I'd either:

1. Go back to Snow Leopard & be done with it

2. Find an Apple Authorized Service Provider (Not an Apple Retail Store - they won't do it) who wil do an SSD upgrade for you, and stick with Mavericks

3. Retire the 7–year-old iMac and upgrade
 

MacMan988

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Jul 7, 2012
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That is how Mavericks is. I spend a lot of time watching the beach ball rotating when I do work on my mac. Some more ram might help you if you don't have enough already.
 

2012Tony2012

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Original poster
Dec 2, 2012
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...Personally, I'd either:

1. Go back to Snow Leopard & be done with it
...
But I was told once by someone, forgot their name, that if I run Snow Leopard I am opening myself to be hacked and my Mac not secure using banking websites etc because Apple stopped releasing security updates for Snow Leopard? :(
 

556fmjoe

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Apr 19, 2014
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But I was told once by someone, forgot their name, that if I run Snow Leopard I am opening myself to be hacked and my Mac not secure using banking websites etc because Apple stopped releasing security updates for Snow Leopard? :(
Your level of risk with Snow Leopard varies depending on the threats.

Viruses: Malware that propagates automatically and spreads from computer to computer. This is what most people think of when they think of security issues. It's unlikely that you will get a real virus on Snow Leopard. None exist in the wild (at the moment) as far as I know, though it's possible that there could be some in the future.

Trojans: This is the classic nasty email attachment or innocent looking download that takes over your machine. It's most likely avenue of attack and the most likely to succeed, but also the easiest to defend against. Don't click on suspicious email links or attachments and don't download software from shady sources and you will be safe from trojans. It doesn't matter what OS you run; smart practices will keep trojans from being an issue.

Browser exploits: This is a pretty common attack that is usually moderately successful. It would happen if you visited a malicious site, or if there was a malicious script running on an otherwise benign website. There have been cases where malware authors have paid to have ads on legitimate sites and installed their malware instead. Many of these exploits are Flash and Java based, and not getting security updates for Java and Flash would be a big deal. In Firefox, you can install NoScript to block all scripts automatically. This will prevent malicious scripts from exploiting your machine, but it will also prevent normal scripts from running as well and may break many websites. You will have to manually allow the scripts you need, which isn't hard, but can be a little irritating.


Individual hackers: This might be the most dangerous attacker, but the least likely. Most of the time, this occurs on public Wifi networks where a hacker scans the ports of the machines on that network and attempts to run exploits against running services on them. Since you are asking about a desktop, I can't imagine this being an issue, unless someone got access to your home network throgh your router. Router security is not too impressive in my opinion, but successful attacks against them are rare. A much more likely problem would be someone guessing your wifi password and getting himself on your network, then port scanning your iMac and attempting to exploit vulnerable services on it. In that case, a lack of updates to your OS would be a problem. However, the chances of this actually occurring are low and you can mitigate the risks by using long, random passphrases and WPA2.
 

2012Tony2012

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 2, 2012
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2
Yes that is right. Bugs don't get fixed anymore.But websecurity could be reached by using i.e. Firefox instead of Safari.
I thought security updates were operating system at times, not dependant on apps alone?

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Your level of risk with Snow Leopard varies depending on the threats.

Viruses: Malware that propagates automatically and spreads from computer to computer. This is what most people think of when they think of security issues. It's unlikely that you will get a real virus on Snow Leopard. None exist in the wild (at the moment) as far as I know, though it's possible that there could be some in the future.

Trojans: This is the classic nasty email attachment or innocent looking download that takes over your machine. It's most likely avenue of attack and the most likely to succeed, but also the easiest to defend against. Don't click on suspicious email links or attachments and don't download software from shady sources and you will be safe from trojans. It doesn't matter what OS you run; smart practices will keep trojans from being an issue.

Browser exploits: This is a pretty common attack that is usually moderately successful. It would happen if you visited a malicious site, or if there was a malicious script running on an otherwise benign website. There have been cases where malware authors have paid to have ads on legitimate sites and installed their malware instead. Many of these exploits are Flash and Java based, and not getting security updates for Java and Flash would be a big deal. In Firefox, you can install NoScript to block all scripts automatically. This will prevent malicious scripts from exploiting your machine, but it will also prevent normal scripts from running as well and may break many websites. You will have to manually allow the scripts you need, which isn't hard, but can be a little irritating.


Individual hackers: This might be the most dangerous attacker, but the least likely. Most of the time, this occurs on public Wifi networks where a hacker scans the ports of the machines on that network and attempts to run exploits against running services on them. Since you are asking about a desktop, I can't imagine this being an issue, unless someone got access to your home network throgh your router. Router security is not too impressive in my opinion, but successful attacks against them are rare. A much more likely problem would be someone guessing your wifi password and getting himself on your network, then port scanning your iMac and attempting to exploit vulnerable services on it. In that case, a lack of updates to your OS would be a problem. However, the chances of this actually occurring are low and you can mitigate the risks by using long, random passphrases and WPA2.
Ok, well reading that, maybe I just use Snow Leopard, never install anything outside of App Store, Use firefox with noscript and I should be ok? :)

Any Apps I can run regularly to check Snow Leopard as well?
 

556fmjoe

macrumors 68000
Apr 19, 2014
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903
I thought security updates were operating system at times, not dependant on apps alone?

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Ok, well reading that, maybe I just use Snow Leopard, never install anything outside of App Store, Use firefox with noscript and I should be ok? :)

Any Apps I can run regularly to check Snow Leopard as well?
That would be a good combination that would deal with most threats. It's also good to disable running services you don't need and don't do any internet browsing while logged in as root (don't login as root anyway unless you have to). You can look at the NSA hardening guide for Snow Leopard here which includes some other tips.