Max spend on on tech?

olindacat

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 15, 2011
164
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Greenwich
Is anyone contemplating at 2015 or older? I've been trying to snag a 2015 15" but waffle over options, e.g., a littl,e bit of AC left, condition (hard to tell on eBay), or just going with some $200 2011 thing to save me from IOS madness until I can trust that newer machines won't be time bombs (although a 2015 is a time bomb too).

How much is smart to spend on this old tech? I'm leery about dropping the same as I can buy a 2018 on a 2015. Thoughts?
 

Stephen.R

macrumors 68000
Nov 2, 2018
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Every generation has some kind of issue that’s inevitably covered by apple warranty and/or a service program.

Keep in mind that any repairs to a 2011 model you’ll need to do yourself, if you can even find the parts.
 
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olindacat

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 15, 2011
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Greenwich
Every generation has some kind of issue that’s inevitably covered by apple warranty and/or a service program.

Keep in mind that any repairs to a 2011 model you’ll need to do yourself, if you can even find the parts.
Nice to see you again, Steve. I used to be able to swap parts myself. Still probably could. The concern is paranoia about OS/software development rendering the old tech useless, or crippled. I design my own (1x a year) print magazine and use InDesign (on my iMac). Nice to be able to do some edits in the MBP I get, but it doesn't need to render 4K with countless titles and effects.
 

Stephen.R

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Well software wise 2011 MacBookPros aren’t supported by Mojave. Not sure about Adobe support for older hardware though.
 

Spudlicious

macrumors 6502
Nov 21, 2015
405
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Bedfordshire, England
Although I'm a proud 2015 owner, I think it's an absolute gem of a laptop, I have to say it would have to be chirpy chirpy cheap cheap to be a star buy in 2019. The battery is ageing (regardless of charge cycles), the CPU is far behind current chips, and Apple hardware support may not be for long, important if you have the misfortune to need (for example) a keyboard replacement.
 

jerryk

macrumors 603
Nov 3, 2011
5,038
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SF Bay Area
Nice to see you again, Steve. I used to be able to swap parts myself. Still probably could. The concern is paranoia about OS/software development rendering the old tech useless, or crippled. I design my own (1x a year) print magazine and use InDesign (on my iMac). Nice to be able to do some edits in the MBP I get, but it doesn't need to render 4K with countless titles and effects.

If your situation allows, you might want to look into some of the online sites that will do this for you. They can have some attractive rates and have tools that let you do the layout online and push a button (after your give them a credit card #). They handle all of the printing, binding, and shipping.
 

olindacat

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 15, 2011
164
15
Greenwich
If your situation allows, you might want to look into some of the online sites that will do this for you. They can have some attractive rates and have tools that let you do the layout online and push a button (after your give them a credit card #). They handle all of the printing, binding, and shipping.
I have been publishing a golf magazine for 24 years. It is a sheetfed job that runs at a commercial printing company. Each year I compare prices for printing it. Most ‘online’ printers run digital short-run jobs, e.g., letterhead, sell sheets, biz cards. They do publications but the economies of scale are such that it is cheaper for me to have that work priced out by brick and mortar printing companies that are located close to the distribution routes I need, e.g., ships that go to Hawaii out of Portland. So, I use a Portland printer. I used to print locally in HI but now the main printing co there shut down. Prices are just so high I can’t affford to print there anymore.

As far as page layout, etc., is concerned: I create the now 84-page magazine in my head. It starts with sales then moves to a bedsheet diagram where I plan out what pages go where, then I shoot the images and write the content th n do the page layouts. There are online sites like upwork, formerly elance, that have freelance designers and I always collaborate with one to add sparkle to my otherwise lackluster skills as a publication designer. Twelve years ago I made enough to employ full time designers in a real office! We had a network of iMacs and I was rich! Now I’m poor, on here, trying to split hairs over a laptop ha ha!

Thanks for the suggestion. I appreciate the help, believe me for every idea we all trade it only takes one good one to have a really positive impact.
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Although I'm a proud 2015 owner, I think it's an absolute gem of a laptop, I have to say it would have to be chirpy chirpy cheap cheap to be a star buy in 2019. The battery is ageing (regardless of charge cycles), the CPU is far behind current chips, and Apple hardware support may not be for long, important if you have the misfortune to need (for example) a keyboard replacement.
Okay. Now I’m hearing what I fear the most, and suspect/ed: the tech is such that is devolves and somwith it are opportunity costs vs diminishing returns as our basic conundrum (apologies to all of you who have painfully analyzed this in other threads).

I suppose buying new tech, with the intent of replacing it every few years, knowing its quality is somewhat dubious, and the ultimate destiny of said unit is the eBay aftermarket, where savvy buyers (and those unsavvy on s, like me, hopefully go on forums like this and learn) can pay market value of said unit, probably less valuable than say an2015, is where we all eventually congregate (or the machines do). I guess we keep hoping for Apple to improve, like I used to hope Bill Gates would, and that means we ar destined for iPads, or our tough luck. The old tech will only work so well, so long.

That all said my OP is still a toughy... I see a unit w AppleCare until 2020 (2015!) it’s got hours left on the auction and is already at $1400! Odds are it’ll fetch $1650.

At that point, you can get a 2018 with more AppleCare left in the tank (2021, for example) and new tech for $500 more. SDColorado has had five replacements, or four, of his 2018. That’s a huge opportunity cost. I’m sure he could weigh in on the financial hit that equated to....

The hassle is more than mailing in a machine for a week, loss of use, etc.

Maybe Uber cheap backup unit and new, to hedge when new breaks. Hmmm.
 

olindacat

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 15, 2011
164
15
Greenwich
$1650 is much more than I paid in 2015 - I didn't realise I was making a shrewd investment!
Very ;-)

Think the old tech will need to be a throw away for now. I’ll have to get some dirt cheap and scrub it down and hold to see what unfolds this year...
 

mcpix

macrumors 6502
May 13, 2005
279
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The 2015 MBPs are popular right now and usually command a higher used price. However, if you go for the 2014 models you can usually find a much better deal. I have both a 2014 and 2015 (my daily driver) MBP and there is virtually no difference between the two. Of course, you probably won't find one with any AC left, but I always check out the battery cycles to get an idea of how much it has been used.
 
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olindacat

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 15, 2011
164
15
Greenwich
The 2015 MBPs are popular right now and usually command a higher used price. However, if you go for the 2014 models you can usually find a much better deal. I have both a 2014 and 2015 (my daily driver) MBP and there is virtually no difference between the two. Of course, you probably won't find one with any AC left, but I always check out the battery cycles to get an idea of how much it has been used.
Oh right. Okay. I see ‘14s on eBay and given the age of the 2015, just assumed the ‘14 wasn’t even a starter. I just don’t see the wisdom in paying $200-300 less (for a 2016-7) over an ‘18, and the better ‘15s are averaging about $1350-$1450 if they have 6-12+ months of AC.

This led me to the conclusion I’d go with a strong new machine to replace my aging iMac, and go cheap with a ‘15 as a bridge device while I wait for whatever is coming on the horizon for ‘19-‘20.

The ‘14-‘15 can just die wh n it dies, but I’d sure feel a lot better knowing it has two years left in it. I can open and sit an InDesign file on a 2014-5. It may not be ideal, but it isn’t like I’m churning 4, 6, 8K Red raw!
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,474
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I would recommend a 2015 if you can find one in good shape.
If it still has a little AppleCare left, all the better.

The 2015 MPB will go down as one of the best MacBooks ever made.
A well-refined, mature laptop.
 

pshufd

macrumors 68000
Oct 24, 2013
1,543
976
New Hampshire
I just bought a 2015 yesterday from a place that refurbs commercial PCs. The parking lot and warehouse looked like it was out of a villain scene in Star City in it was in a city with a very high crime rate and a hub for drug distribution. So they have low operating costs. It would have been fun to look at all of the other stuff that they have.

If I really needed something new, I'd get a Mac Mini + portable KVM and a carrying case. But 2014/2015 is good enough for what I do. BTW, my 2008 still works - but needs a new backlight. I can use it with a KVM.

There are lots of these coming off corporate use as they've been expensed and replaced with newer models. My company gives out MBPs and they replace them after five years.
 

olindacat

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 15, 2011
164
15
Greenwich
Thanks for the tips. I have been lurking in eBay for a used 2014/15 and bid on several and lost. I am near NYC but doubt there is anything quite like Star City near me, ha ha. I have an iMac so don't want the Mini and keyboard and screen set-up. Been there done that before. The laptop is ideal for living room or travel use. My wife and i fight for the two iPads we use but we both hate them. They have sufficed for email and basic browsing but are painful to type on (for us).