MBA fan control ?

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by mayuka, Jul 4, 2012.

  1. mayuka macrumors 6502a

    mayuka

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    #1
    Hi.

    For my old Macbook there are some apps available that let you control the fans to control the heat in and outside of the laptop. Since I'm planning to purchase a new MBA soon, I'm asking whether similar tools are available for the MBA.
     
  2. mattopotamus macrumors G5

    mattopotamus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
  3. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #3
    Macs are designed to run warm to hot.

    Just use it & ignore the heat.

    That's how you know it's a Mac :)
     
  4. mortenandersen macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2011
    Location:
    Norway
    #4
    No fan noise, then?

    It this to be understood as that the MacBook Air 11.6" emits no or very little fan noise under "normal" use (that is: Word, surfing, and the like)? Is the fan so to speak not running? And when it is running: Is the noise very low?

    For me and many others this is a critical factor. I will rather ignore a bit heat, just for not have a fan noise, which for me really is annoying and disturbing.
     
  5. mayuka thread starter macrumors 6502a

    mayuka

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    #5
    smcfancontrol does not work on my macbook. Isn't there another app?
     
  6. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #6
    Normal operation is variable from one person to the next. These laptops are so thin that you've got to expect the fan to run as needed. It all depends on the parameters Apple uses. I don't have that data.

    There's no way to know if you'll like it till you're using it in your own environment. The ambient noise level in the Apple store is too high to judge the computer.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    You don't need smcFanControl to keep your Mac temperatures in a safe operating range. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:

    Use iStat Pro to get readings of your temps and fan speeds, even if you can't hear them.
     
  8. mayuka thread starter macrumors 6502a

    mayuka

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    #8
    The problem are not overheating laptops or something similar. In normal state they're just too hot for me. When I burn my skin because the surface of the aluminium-body gets so hot, that's a no-go.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    As Apple states in the MacBook Air User Guide:
     
  10. kodeman53 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 4, 2012
    #10
    Clearly Apple assumed too high a level of intelligence and common sense. You mean we are supposed to remove the MBA from our laps BEFORE we are burned? I supposed they will have to adopt the same standards as the companies who manufacture plastic wrap (WARNING: Do not wrap around your head and keep away from babies), packing peanuts (Do not eat), prepared coffee (Coffee is hot), etc., and engrave a warning on the bottom of the MBA, WARNING: Keep away from crotch, unless you are into that kind of thing.
     
  11. mayuka thread starter macrumors 6502a

    mayuka

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    #11
    I'm not stupid. :mad: I know how to use a laptop and I know where the exhaust vents are...

    The problem is how Apple defines "hot". I guess they have totally different perceptions in that manner. If you ever touched the upper left part of a Powerbook G4 you know how hot these things can get. Maybe you're not so long an Apple user that you could remember...
     
  12. dyn, Jul 4, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2012

    dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #12
    These are notebooks which are a bit different than laptops. There is no manufacturer out there that defines it differently from what Apple does. Notebooks are not meant to be used on your lap, you should use them on a desk. At least that's what all those manufacturers say in the leaflets/booklets/etc. that comes with the notebook.
     
  13. AlanShutko macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2008
    #13
    FWIW, my 13" i7 was just at full fan speed while I was playing Sam & Max and it was not uncomfortable on my lap. Seems to run cooler than my 2009 MBA.
     
  14. mortenandersen macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2011
    Location:
    Norway
    #14
    This gives me the impression of a very high fan noise

    OK, not uncomfortable heat, but what about the fan noise? Is the 2012 MacBook Air recommendable to persons who strongly dislike fan noise? (The intended use of the Air is mostly writing documents and surfing the internet, so that gives a clue regarding the level of work being conducted.)
     
  15. mayuka thread starter macrumors 6502a

    mayuka

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    #15
    I strongly disagree. Whereas a MBP 15" is a working horse, the 11" MBA is mainly meant for traveling, and thus used often on your lap because there's either no desk around or it is more comfortable surfing or gaming with it sitting on the couch. Some models get quite hot at the underside, some at the upper surface. I want to do multivariate statistics while sitting on the couch without burning my laps.

    There's a nice tool for older Macbooks and Mac minis out there, called Fan Control:

    http://www.lobotomo.com/products/FanControl/

    But it does not work on new models.
     
  16. dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #16
    It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree with it, this is how the manufacturers themselves see their products. And yes, it is different from what most people will use it for in reality. Still, it is very useful to know their viewing point, especially if you want children later on in your life (heat from notebooks used on your lap will affect sperm quality and thus being able to conceive children; search for it and you'll find the study).
     

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