MBP 15" Questions

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by joss1323, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. joss1323 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    #1
    Okay so I'm going to school for graphic design and I'm buying a customized 15" Macbook Pro and what I need to know is whats best for me. I'll also be using it when I'm working. This is what I've made up for myself at this point but I have a couple questions about it.

    2.0GHz Quad-core Intel Core i7- Will this work or should I go for the 2.2 GHz?

    500GB Serial ATA Drive @ 7200 rpm- Whats the difference between this and the 750GB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm, and the 500GB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm, as well as the solid state drives?

    8GB 1333MHz DDR3 SDRAM - 2x4GB
    SuperDrive 8x (DVD±R DL/DVD±RW/CD-RW)
    MacBook Pro 15-inch Hi-Res Antiglare Widescreen Display
    Backlit Keyboard (English) & User's Guide
    Accessory Kit

    If I'm going to customize a computer I want to make sure I get it right. I'm going to be using the Adobe CS5.5 Design Standard and I want to make sure it will run smoothly as well as being able to keep the future in mind and have whatever programs I need to install in the future run just as smoothly.
     
  2. BLOCKMONSTER macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    #2
    Quite honestly... if you're a hands on type of person. I would just get the highest processor you can afford. Buy 8GB ram from Newegg and possibly a SSD too and stick the 500GB hdd in an external.

    Option #1 (Apple) 2800$+tax
    2.3 i7, 500GB hdd, 8GB RAM, hi-res AG

    Option #2 (DIY) 2600$+250$=2850+tx
    2.3 i7, 128GB SSD (self install), 8GB RAM (self), hi-res AG'

    So basically, #2 is a little more BUT you get a 128GB SSD for Lion/Apps and now you have a 500GB hdd for extra storage. Since your doing graphics, this can come in handy.
     
  3. randomrazr macrumors 65816

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    Jan 1, 2011
    #3
    there is no point of someone buying the highest spec computer and not taking advantage of the high specs. thats just blowing money right threre
     
  4. BLOCKMONSTER macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    #4
    You cant upgrade the processor down the line so might as well get the best 1 now (that you can afford). Buying a CTO Apple high-spec'ed dont mean anything but Apple doing it for you. You can ALWAYS trade out the HDD and ram to your liking.
     
  5. derickdub macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Location:
    VA
    #5
    The high end 15" is really what's best for your money with the student discount IMO. Since you are getting a $200 discount vs the $100, the extra $300 is worth the significantly better graphics and better processor.

    Also, I don't know about Apple's SSDs, but getting the high end model means you could upgrade to a 128GB SSD for only $90 with student discount. No, you won't have the 750GB (or 500GB is you opt for the faster drive) as a spare/external, but you could buy an external drive for less than the cost of a 128GB SSD from newegg - the $90 for the upgrade.

    I personally don't think the 2.3GHz is worth the $225 though.

    Edit:

    I should also note that no matter what discount you are getting, the 8GB ram really isn't worth what they charge. Get 8GB online and sell the 4GB to make up for some of the cost.
     
  6. joss1323 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    #6
    2.0GHz Quad-core Intel Core i7
    500GB Serial ATA Drive @ 7200 rpm
    8GB 1333MHz DDR3 SDRAM - 2x4GB
    SuperDrive 8x (DVD±R DL/DVD±RW/CD-RW)
    MacBook Pro 15-inch Hi-Res Antiglare Widescreen Display
    Backlit Keyboard (English) & User's Guide
    Accessory Kit

    Thanks for the replies, but what I really want to know is will this computer be able to do the things I need it to do plus more. I'm not good with hardware and have no idea how to install it myself. I need a computer ready to use out of the box. This is also my first mac and I need it to last as long as possible.
     
  7. BLOCKMONSTER macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    #7
    Yes. But if you don't mind a desktop, the imac is worth a look.
     
  8. joss1323 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    #8
    Sweet, thanks.

    But which is best for what i need it for. Does 7200rpm means it's faster and if so will that effect the way my computer runs i.e heat, crash whatever could happen?
    500GB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm
    500GB Serial ATA Drive @ 7200 rpm or
    750GB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm


    I already have a desktop computer (it's windows) and Mac is what they use in my classes and is what the teacher recommended for what I'm doing. That's why I'm looking for a mac laptop. My desktop wouldn't be able to handle the programs I need it to and I just bought it not to long ago. I could probably get it upgraded but I also want to keep my work and play separate and don't really see the point of upgrading my desktop.
     
  9. 2hvy4grvty macrumors 6502

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    Jun 17, 2011
    #9
    If you have no plans for an SSD, just stick to the 500/7200. However, if you plan on going SSD + HDD, get the 750/5400 if for storage alone.
     
  10. Ole'schooliBook macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2011
    #10
    I agree with this.

    I actually just ordered a 15", 2.2GHz, Hi-Res A/G MBP. Should be arriving tomorrow or Tuesday and I absolutely can't wait. Moving from my current 2007 White MacBook will be a *HUGE* performance increase that I'm really looking forward to. I went with the 750GB 5400RPM drive since the speed difference between it and the 7200 RPM drive is really not too drastic. Noticeable-yes, but nowhere near what the speed bump will be between 5400 RPM and an SSD when the prices moderate to a more reasonable level. At least while you're waiting for that to happen, you'll probably never have a storage problem with 750GB. Also, since you're using it for graphic design, a lot of your projects could take up a lot of space. Might as well get the max now, and then replace it with a comparable size SSD when the price is right.

    Good luck, OP, with your purchase. Trust me, the anticipation builds pretty drastically when the order is placed and you start tracking your shipment from China to your front door. Fun times!
     
  11. Oxonian3 macrumors regular

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    Jul 13, 2011
    Location:
    Trinidad
    #11
    Hands down yes man
     
  12. wegster macrumors 6502

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    Nov 1, 2006
    #12
    The 7200RPM is indeed faster. If you don't want to spend the $$$$$ for SSD, and as you mentioned graphics design, I'd go up to the 2.2GHz as it brings a better GPU with it with more dedicated video RAM.

    2.2GHz CPU
    HR/AG screen
    4GB RAM (buy gskill or crucial 8GB kit yourself for $50 or less)
    I'd buy the 500GB 7200 RPM drive unless you *know* you'll be buying an SSD *soon*, or depending on the discount, buy the apple ssd, and pick up an ebay optibay kit for $20 + your choice of 7200RPM HD.

    I wouldn't pay Apple $200 for the 8GB RAM kit, and I wouldn't pay another 250 for the jump to the 2.3GHz CPU. I would go with the 2.2GHz for the jump to better gpu and more dedicated VRAM for your claimed usage.
     
  13. joss1323 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    #13
    If I did upgrade to sdd would that mean it would be installed in addition to the hdd that would already be there?

    How would I go about upgrading it, would I have to do it myself or would I be able to pay for someone whose qualified to do it?

    And also if I end up getting the sdd installed will that screw my warranty?

    Thanks for your replies.
     
  14. BLOCKMONSTER macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    #14
    when youre doin CTO and pick a SSD, thats in place of the the standard hdd. but if you just pick the standard then down the line you can add a SSD and still have you're hdd (and vice versa).

    you can install it yourself... real easy. 10 screws, pop off the back, detach batt cable, 2 screws, pop sata cable, switch drives, go in reverse to put it back togethr. or have someone install it.

    no, it wont void your warranty.
     
  15. Mac-key macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 1, 2010
    Location:
    Alabama
    #15
    I second this ^^^^

    I have this exact same configuration, well slightly different, I upgraded my HD to 750/7200. Either way, this machine is MORE than capable.

    As long as you are not a hard-core gamer or do intensive 3D modeling - the base will be plenty for you.
     
  16. deadlystriker macrumors regular

    deadlystriker

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    #16
    I recommend the high end 15" 2.2 processor because that is not upgradeable. Also applies for the screen, go for anti glare. The 6750M (only available with 2.2, 2.3 cpu) will last you much better than the 6490M. Ram and storage are upgradeable so less worries there. I definitely recommend 8GB of ram and a SSD if you can afford it. If money is tight, go with the 500GB 7200rpm drive for now and wait for SSD prices to drop in future. Can't go wrong with this.
     
  17. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    #17
    The main difference between the 2.0Ghz i7 and the 2.2Ghz i7 are:

    Ability to use 16GB of RAM
    Ability to use 1600Mhz RAM
    The GPU

    So, what you're paying $400 more for is practically the GPU. Which might be worth it for many people.
    The 2.3Ghz is NOT worth it, it's just a 0.1Ghz difference that you pay $200 more for.

    8GB RAM is much cheaper when bought from Newegg. Same with the hard drive.
    The hi-res screen is, IMO, a must. The glossy is fine, but if you really hate glare then go with the antiglare.

    For the price of your maxed out 2.0Ghz MBP on Apple's site, you could get a DIY maxed out 2.2Ghz.

    The 750GB 5,400RPM hard drive has more space but is slower. The 500GB 7,200RPM hard drive has less space but is faster. The 500GB 5,400RPM hard drive has less space and is slower.
    ALL hard drives are mechanical, which means moving parts and more susceptibility to physical shock. Solid state drives store data through transistors and other electronic components, which means no moving parts. So, what you'll get with a SSD is monstrous speeds, no noise, extreme durability, and an empty wallet.
     
  18. Mac-key macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 1, 2010
    Location:
    Alabama
    #18
    are you sure you can't upgrade a base model 15" to 16GB of RAM?

    OWC says otherwise
     
  19. joss1323 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 21, 2011
  20. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

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    Nov 18, 2010
    #20
    Intel released the CPU, which has the memory controller, which can only handle 8GB 1333Mhz
    Check out Intel ARK data on 2630QM.
     
  21. Titanium81 macrumors 6502a

    Titanium81

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    Jun 23, 2011
    #21
    So only the High End 15" MBP and 17" MBP can upgrade to 16GB RAM?
     
  22. Naimfan macrumors 68040

    Naimfan

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    Jan 15, 2003
    #22
  23. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

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    Nov 18, 2010
    #23
    Intel Core i7-2820QM 2.3Ghz supports 16GB and 1600Mhz.


    Intel Core i7-2720QM 2.2Ghz supports 16GB and 1600Mhz.


    Intel Core i7-2630QM 2.0Ghz does not support 16GB and 1600Mhz.


    Intel Core i7-2620M 2.7Ghz does not support 16GB and 1600Mhz.


    Intel Core i5-2410M 2.3Ghz does not support 16GB and 1600Mhz.


    By "support" I mean that the processor can take full advantage of the 16GB. You can stick 16GB RAM into a 13" MBP but they'll only be able to use 8GB of it, since that's the maximum amount that the CPU supports.

    Therefore, only the high-end 15" and the 17" are able to fully utilize that monstrous amount of RAM.
     
  24. 2hvy4grvty macrumors 6502

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    Jun 17, 2011
    #24
    Unless you have a PC. Then 1600/1866 works perfectly fine in a 2630qm.
     
  25. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    #25
    It'll run at 1333Mhz, but yes they will work fine.
    Also, this is regardless of the operating system, because it is a hardware issue.
     

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