MBP i5 15" Memory Upgrade?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jlc1978, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. jlc1978 macrumors 68000

    jlc1978

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    #1
    I have a 15" i5 with 4GBs that I plan to upgrade to 8gb. I bought two 4GB Patriot sticks from Frys ($60 each after rebates) but am not sure they'll work. Has anybody had any experience with Patriots 4GB 1333 CL9 SODIMMS(PSD32G13332S)? Fry's has a restock charge if I take them out of the box so if anyone has tried them and knows if tehy work or don't work I'd appreciate the feedback.

    Searchs brought up mixed results over the stability of 1333mHZ CL9 (9-9-9-24) memory in a MBP and no references to this particular brand hence this post.

    thanks
     
  2. TopHatPlus macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Location:
    Southern Ontario
    #2
    i am not sure that the bus speed is correct, and i have not seen that bus speed available for a laptop, the new macbook pros run 1066 bus speed ram. As long as it is laptop size it should work just worried about the speed.
     
  3. mulo macrumors 68020

    mulo

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Location:
    Behind you
    #3
    arrogant like I always am I'd be careful when opening them and if they don't work I'd put it back in the packaging and play the plausible deniability card.
     
  4. CW Jones macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Location:
    CT
    #4
    I replied the same in another thread saying I didn't think the bus speeds would work together, I was however quickly corrected by someone smarter than I saying they would be fine just downgrade the RAM. DO some more searching on it tho and don't take just my word on it.

    Make sure you do enough research the first time so you don't end up wasting $120 too.
     
  5. mulo macrumors 68020

    mulo

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Location:
    Behind you
    #5
    I know you can use PC10600 in the MBP's but they will be underclocked to the speed of a PC8500 module.
     
  6. Covart Guest

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Location:
    Europe
    #6
    Yep, one chip will work, when used in conjunction with another chip rated at 1066, but try to put both in and your computer won't boot up (in OSX). It will in bootcamp though. :D

    You bought the wrong memory. You need DDR3 1066 PC3 8500.
     
  7. cluthz macrumors 68040

    cluthz

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    Norway
    #7
    Memory will downclock just fine. I had PC2-6400 in my SR MBP, it downclocked to PC2-5300.

    Use maching pairs tho
     
  8. Covart Guest

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Location:
    Europe
    #8
    If you put two chips in your MBP, both rated at a higher clock speed, OSX WILL NOT boot up.

    If you put a chip in that is rated for your computer and one chip that is clocked higher, the computer will boot into OSX, but both chips will be clocked at the slower, correct speed.

    You DO NOT need to have matching pairs either. You can use a 2GB and 4GB chip in conjunction and your system will be just fine. It will have a minor impact on performance, but nothing the average user will notice.

    I know all this because I have played with a bunch of memory and conducted my own personal experiments. :D If you don't believe me, try it yourself.
     
  9. jlc1978 thread starter macrumors 68000

    jlc1978

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    #9
    So far so good

    Well, I decided to give them a try. For$60 each they were too good to pass up.

    So far, they work fine - passed memory test on techtools 5; the Mac sees them as 8GB of 1066 so it appears they downclock fine. Will see if system is stable for the next few days as the real test.

    If they start acting strange they'll go back for as set of $210 Crucials.

    As a side note; it would make sense for Apple to use the higher spec memory in iMacs and MBPs; even if they call for different specs. From a supply chain standpoint buying x+y of one type should be cheaper than x of iMac and y of MBP. Apple could claim different specs, and even label them differently but use the same underlying chip for cost reasons. I'm not saying they do; but I think it would make sense form a cost perspective.
     

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