MBP LG display replaced with crappy Chi Mei 9C6D--help!

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by drasil, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. drasil macrumors newbie

    drasil

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    #1
    hello everyone.

    I'm the proud owner of a 2.2ghz/2gb RAM Penryn MBP (2007) that is about to leave the AppleCare nest. I took it into the apple store to get a couple minor issues fixed before it expired--one of which included some spotting on the screen that I thought was accumulated dead pixels but which turned out to be some kind of pressure markings.

    To make a long story short, I convinced the geniuses to replace the display, which was a matte LG that had, apart from the marks' appearances, been fantastic with great color balance.

    Unfortunately, when I got my machine back the next day, I was horrified to discover that my screen had been replaced with a 9C6D Chi Mei display that looks very... blue. There's a blue cast to everything, and although I'm not sure the average user would notice it, I see it every time I look at the screen, no matter how I try to calibrate it. It's making me crazy and giving me a headache.

    Before I take it back to the Apple store, I wanted to have an open solicitation for advice. Does anyone have any further information about the 9C6D displays? do they have problems in general? has anyone else seen one?

    And how can I explain this to Apple? Like I said, it's not like everything is completely blue. It's more like a cast that I can't get rid of even if I cut half of the blue in the balance in calibration. I'm worried they won't see it or believe me.

    Thanks in advance. I hope someone's got something for me.
     
  2. robotmonkey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    #2
    You asked for it to get restored to original condition, not something new. IDK if they don't carry your screen still, but if they do I suggest making an issue over it. But I'm just that type of person:rolleyes:
     
  3. Reapur macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    #3
    Sell it buy a new MBP, its 3 years old!
     
  4. drasil thread starter macrumors newbie

    drasil

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    #4
    I'm not sure I understand your reply. Apple replaced my old (and spotted) LG display with a new Chi Mei one. The new display seems to be uniquely defective, barring the revelation of any further info about the 9C6Ds--which I hope someone has!


    I wish I had the disposable income to do that, but I don't. I also love this computer and have treated it very well.
     
  5. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #5
    Have you tried calibrating it with a hardware calibrator? If you haven't, consider picking up a Pantone Huey, it did wonders for my MacBook Pro's LCD.
     
  6. MICHAELSD macrumors 68040

    MICHAELSD

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Location:
    NJ
    #6
    The truth is that Apple uses multiple display manufacturers, so consistency isn't fantastic, and you have a chance that they will say it's an acceptable specification. Have you tried calibrating your display? Go into System Preferences - Display - Colors (I believe), then hit calibrate. Try looking through the color temperatures, a warmer temperature (more yellowish) may fix your issue. I mow that LG has been rated as having the inferior display in previous MacBook Pro generations, with side-by-side comparisons showing the Chi Mei displays to have a much higher contrast ratio.
     
  7. panzer06 macrumors 68030

    panzer06

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Kilrath
    #7
    It's a nvidia 8600 time bomb. Sell it now before the 3 years are up.

    You might get enough to put toward a more recent MBP 15. Best of luck.

    Btw, if u decide to keep it I'd start saving my money because that 8600 won't last forever.

    Cheers,
     
  8. drasil thread starter macrumors newbie

    drasil

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    #8
    A good suggestion.

    I should explain a reason I can detect the color weirdness--I do a lot of photographic retouching. I do all my work by eye, so I'm particularly sensitive to color balances in general. I'm not sure a hardware calibrator would be able to do anything I haven't done, but it's worth considering. Maybe if I told Apple I have one they'd believe me more readily.

    Right now, the closest-to-even color balance I can get is:

    R: 255
    G: 238
    B: 135

    The red/green discrepancy seems normal, but that's almost a 50% cut in the blue--so it must be defective?

    Bueller? Bueller?
     
  9. jbyun04 macrumors 6502a

    jbyun04

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #9
    Any ideas on approximate lifespan for someone who uses Adobe CS4 and Final Cut Studio on a daily basis (MBP Mid 2009 2.8GHZ)?
     
  10. kny3twalker macrumors 65816

    kny3twalker

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    #10
    The 2009s do not have the 8600gt gpu.
     
  11. MICHAELSD macrumors 68040

    MICHAELSD

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Location:
    NJ
    #11
    I'd give the video card and processor at least ten years. As long as you don't haw any random issues, I'd say 10-15 years at the least.
     
  12. drasil thread starter macrumors newbie

    drasil

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    #12
    I've treated this computer like gold, which was the main thrust of how I got Apple to replace the screen in the first place even though pressure marks aren't under warranty. The chassis still looks brand new. I hope that everything inside is in decent order as a consequence of my good care. If any 8600 is going to last, it would be the one inside this machine.

    I'm still hoping for more information about the Chi Mei 9C6D I've been given. How do they compare to the other manufacturers' displays? Is this blue problem common?
     
  13. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #13
    If you're doing photographic retouching you should definitely already have a hardware color calibrater. I do a lot of photographic work as well and since getting the hardware calibrator I can tell you that it is more than worth its price. This one is only $50 with free shipping and is the one that I currently own and use. The prints that I get are very close to what my monitor now displays, so I would say that it is a very good deal.
     
  14. joelypolly macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2003
    Location:
    Melbourne & Shanghai
    #14
    Sound like you just need to get the right profile for your display

    Blue cast can be very easily caused by incorrect color profile and or white point
     
  15. wschutz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #15
    And? Life is about using devices and not having the latest of the latest when the old ones still satisfy your needs...

    /Proud owner of a 3 years old MB ;) and a 6 years old PC Laptop :)
     
  16. drasil thread starter macrumors newbie

    drasil

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    #16
    Yes... I am aware. As I posted above, I have to cut the blue by half to make the display look passable, so I don't think this is a normal color balance issue. And I'd never use someone else's color profile for my own display; manufacturing variance makes that feasible only for casual users.

    I think it's interesting that nobody has pointed out that I probably shouldn't be color-correcting photos on a notebook display, which is true. But then, so's this:

    ...or if you don't have the money to upgrade.
     
  17. joelypolly macrumors 6502

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    Sep 14, 2003
    Location:
    Melbourne & Shanghai
    #17
    What about changing the white point? I know in mine when it was set incorrectly it was really blue
     
  18. drasil thread starter macrumors newbie

    drasil

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    #18
    Freehand manipulation of a display's color balance is the same thing as adjusting its white point, which is the same thing as adjusting the "color temperature" (here meaning the emulation of a color temperature unless your monitor is as hot as the Sun).

    So, yes, that is exactly what this thread is about. The white point of my display cannot be placed at a desirable location without overdoing the manipulation. Imagine a monitor for which an image can only be seen if you turn the brightness all the way up. It's usable, but you know something is wrong because you have to set the controls in an unusual way.

    I'm still hoping that someone knows something I don't about the Chi Mei 9C6D.
     
  19. panzer06 macrumors 68030

    panzer06

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Kilrath
    #19
    in general perhaps but the nvidia 8600s are not so good. Too many have died and been replaced to believe one will make it for too long.

    No way i'd feel comfortable with thinking an 8600 will last anywhere near thar long.

    Cheers,
     
  20. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #20
    +1

    Always use a hardware calibrater. It doesn't matter how good you think your eye is, the human eye will always be fooled by the ambient light in the room as well as surrounding colors on the desktop.

    EyeOne colorimeters are fairly cheap, I paid roughly $300 for mine and they work great. Also others have stated the Hueys but I have never used one of those so I can't comment on it.
     
  21. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    Jan 26, 2008
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    Isla Nublar
    #21
    It's not though. By name it is, but the results are completely different. You have basic control by doing it free hand but a dedicated colorimeter can do it much better. The color profile that a colorimeter produces has much more options for adjusting color then what an end user does by adjusting color in the software or on the monitor itself.

    The guy in my office used to hand calibrate everything and was also convinced he had a bad monitor because he could not get the colors adjusted the way he wanted. I popped one of my colorimeters on his monitor and now its flawless.

    With a colorimeter, you manually get it as close as you can, then the software will flash colors that the device reads. The software then takes these readings and mathematically adjusts the colors your monitor is producing to make the colors its producing perfect via the profile it creates. (Theres a bit more to it but I won't go into the programming nitty gritties).

    When you do it by hand, you may be able to get close with one color, but then another color will be off, the colorimeter doesn't have this problem it can adjust them all individually.
     
  22. MICHAELSD macrumors 68040

    MICHAELSD

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    Jul 13, 2008
    Location:
    NJ
    #22
    That was in reference to the mid-2009 MacBook Pro somebody had asked about, which has a 9600M GT.
     
  23. EHVio macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    #23
    ^^ Pantone should have been paying me, considering the number of Hueys I sold while working at Wolf Camera... Try one out, it could very well be the solution to your problems.
     
  24. panzer06 macrumors 68030

    panzer06

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Kilrath
    #24
    Ah yes, the newer replacement nvidia chipset which thus far has shown itself to be considerably more stable than it's predecessor. Perhaps it will last longer, though I doubt many folks have a 10 year life expectation.

    Cheers,
     
  25. wschutz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #25
    For what it's worth... I had a Late 2008 MBP... which I sold last January after the flickering was fixed... and I was about to buy the 2009 model until I saw the waiting thread... I waited for the current one until I saw the freezing problems... and since then I said "no, thanks".
    I can buy whatever MBP I want, and I could surely use the 15" screen ;) because I prefer Mac OS X over Linux for non-server work but... I don't want to deal with problems Apple hasn't been able to fix ;)
    What I have satisfies my needs, I could do things with the latest of the latest, but I realized after all this time, that I don't really need it. I can do what I do with what I have, there's no point on showing an aluminium computer to my friends :)
    In my case Apple's failure to fix a problem have taught me to fully analyze my needs, and the result is... no money for Mr. Jobs ;) When you say you have the best laptops in the market and all that marketing-crap... the least you could do when you have some problem with that hardware is to acknowledge... and then fix it. None of them have happened yet.
    Next revision... we'll see :)
     

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