MBP "Low end" vs. "High end"

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by vchalupa, Mar 9, 2008.

  1. vchalupa macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    #1
    I'm looking to buy a new MBP and I wanted to know if there was a big difference from the "low end" to the "high end" especially with the new penryn processors. For example, if I had to MBP in front of me, both upgraded to 4GB RAM, is there going to be a significant performance difference.

    I intend to do some video and photo editting and I play games rarely. I will be an engineering and pre-med student so I'll need some CPU power to run the engineering programs. And there's a good chance that I'll need to run windows for proprietary engineering programs that are made only for Windows.

    So in the end, is it worth the extra $500?
     
  2. digitalpencil macrumors 6502

    digitalpencil

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #2
    If your not playing games and are intending on maxing to 4gb anyway, i'd say you'll be more than happy with the base model.
     
  3. markrivers macrumors 6502a

    markrivers

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    Valencia, California
    #3
    the difference in L2 cache matters to me.

    the base has 3 the next has 6

    if you're wiling to spend more than 2000 for a laptop, go with the high end MBP
     
  4. chrisbeebops macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    #4
    Both laptops will be able to run the same programs. The high end MBP will just have slightly better performance. If you are already going to dish out that much money for a low end MBP you might as well spend the extra $$ for the high end one if you have the $$ on hand.
     
  5. EvryDayImShufln macrumors 65816

    EvryDayImShufln

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    #5
    If you have the money on hand, you should probably put it in your bank or invest it. Don't piss it away on a small performance boost unless you're a professional to whom the performance will actually increase productivity and profit.

    Trust me, even games will work just fine on the base model, and I believe the base model might also have slightly longer battery life.
     
  6. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Location:
    5045 feet above sea level
    #6
    you will NOT be running engineering programs on your computer. sooner you realize that the better

    a) you wont have licenses to
    b) the lab computers are significanly more powerful than a mbp
     
  7. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Location:
    Pa
    #7
    a) Not true at all. Some engineering schools have a site license that applies to students' personal computers as well.

    b) Once again, this depends on the school's machines. Drexel was using G5 PowerMac's (with an outrageous amount of RAM though) when I got my C2D Macbook Pro.

    What you should realize is that the extra power isn't going to do you any good, for your first year or two. And by the time it would do you some good, well, your computer will be old anyway.
     
  8. burningrave101 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    #8
    The more expensive 2.5Ghz model only gives you a small boost in performance due to the extra L2 cache. In most applications there will be almost no difference in performance between the T8300 and T9300 due to the 100Mhz speed difference. People always look at benchmarks and think a few points here and there translate to actual real world differences that you will notice. If you can't run your application on a T8300 then you won't be running it on the T9300 either. If it only cost an extra $100 to upgrade to the T9300 from the base model then I would go with it but definitely not for $500. Save the money and put it towards your next MBP. There will always be faster processors coming within just a few months of each other.
     
  9. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Location:
    5045 feet above sea level
    #9
    a) fine for SOME but not close to all you use i admit as does mine. however you will find that your mbp wont stand up to lab computers if the school is shall i say funded well

    b) how does an engineering school use macs in the first place when all mainstream engineering software is windows....
     
  10. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Location:
    Pa
    #10
    a) true, some programs didn't have a license that would allow you to use them.

    b) I have no idea, but the only professors I ever saw who used Windows based computers at Drexel was in the Math department, and I think that was because they required tablets, which Apple obviously doesn't make-- the special software that the math department used was cross platform.
     

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