MBP overheating after motherboard washing?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Cubytus, Nov 10, 2015.

  1. Cubytus macrumors 65816

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    Mar 2, 2007
    #1
    Hi there,

    I had a coffee spill accident with my MBP. While it is now safe thanks to swift action, the motherboard was washed using a "basic solution" in an ultrasonic bath. But since then, it tends to quickly rise in temperature with heavier usage, routinely over 98ºC as reported by Macs Fan Control. Idle temperature is 70 degrees. The radiator is clean, as is the fan. Before the accident, I don't remember it going over 85ºC under load.

    Is it possible the basic bath damaged the thermal paste and that it would need to be re-applied?
     
  2. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #2
    I wouldn't use the same thermal paste if it went into a ultrasonic bath. The bath couldve destroyed or dissolved the thermal paste
     
  3. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    Jul 24, 2009
    #3
    Why would you put a logic board in a sonic bath with the heat sink still attached?

    Yes you need to remove the heading clean the old compound off and apply new thermal paste
     
  4. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #4
    I haven't asked the technician if he removed / replaced the heatsink. Maybe he did, but the end result is higher uverall temperature. In all cases, I should re-do that?
     
  5. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #5
    It almost sounds like there is no thermal paste anymore and the processor and graphics unit is just heating up with no where for the heat to go
     
  6. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #6
    From the side of the CPU, I see a bit of excess thermal paste, but nothing as bad as one series of 15" MBPs a few years ago. But obviously I don't know how it looks above the core. I do know the CPU gets cooler as fast as before, though.

    CPU proximity currently shows 64 degrees, and the RAM is at 60, it hotter than I remember it was.

    I got some leftover Artic Silver 5 from previous jobs, as well as thermal paste remover. What would be the proper procedure to loosen the heatsink from the CPU without any damage?
     
  7. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    #7
    Depends on the model but normally it's losen everything then twist and lift.
     
  8. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #8
    Just loosen up the screws. Slowly remove the heat sink. It's not glued on so it won't just pop off. But don't use excessive pulling pressure either
     
  9. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #9
    And use many, many lint-free towellettes saturated with paste remover to clean the core and heatsink?
    What is a "normal" temperature for an i7 in a 13" under moderate usage?

    I would have liked to avoid dismantling the motherboard for the 4th time (1st: wash, 2nd: remove fried keyboard, 3rd: reinstall new keyboard…)… Oh well.
     
  10. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #10
    You'll know when you take it off to clean.

    When I had the 13 inch core i7, my temps ranged in the 50s idle and 70-100 on load. I didn't care too much about it since it is designed to run in those conditions
     
  11. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Looks like we have similar temperatures. From experience it usually becomes less stable above 90 degrees, even if the CPU itself is still far from a dangerous temperature. Is it worth the hassle of re-doing the thermal pasting again, knowing the only issue is the fan's noise?
     
  12. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #12
    Only if you have stability issues. Mine was stable even at max load which I normally run on my systems for days or weeks.
     
  13. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #13
    Not so far. Just a bit concerned that higher temperature would shorten the life of the already worn components. At least a side benefit to this wasted heat is I don't get cold hands anymore when sitting in my gf's cold apartment.
     
  14. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #14
    I don't think the life will shorten to the point where you'll notice. I've seen computers run in even more extreme conditions and last 5+ years. Our server room is at a constant 85-95 deg F inside with no AC and has been running for years.
     
  15. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #15


    This makes me think that possibly the thermal sensor was damaged by the spill or the clean - best way to tel is to verify the temps using a laser thermometer (remove base screws, replace base, allow to heat up, then pop the base cover off and check the actual temps...
     
  16. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #16
    Except this motherboard received a harsh treatment it was no designed for. First boiling hot coffee, then sonic washer. Plus probably some leftover particles of coffee.

    Good point. I'd have to fetch such a thermometer however.
     
  17. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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  18. Cubytus, Nov 11, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2015

    Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #18
    Because I am still unsure yet the risk / benefits ratio is worth it on what I assume is a more fragile motherboard. And, though tech-savvy, I don't know if I'll make an optimal job.

    And by the way, I noticed Arctic Silver has two other thermal compunds available: the Céramique, and the Alumina. Back in the day, the Arctic Silver 5 was widely told to be the best thermal compound available, but maybe things changed? Which thermal compound would provide the best thermal transfer for this MBP?
     
  19. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    #19
    A sonic washer gets rid of everything that could leave residue on the motherboard. We use it at work to clean products used in clean rooms and medical fields.

    I still recommend doing a thermal paste change. Especially since you got the board washed and possibly with the heatsink still attached.
     
  20. Cubytus thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #20
    Meanwhile, I read that the Gelid GC-Extreme would beat the Arctic Silver 5… If I could only find this Gelid stuff.

    Are sonic washers powerful enough to dislodge ground coffee from under the components?
     
  21. Andy2k macrumors member

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    Jul 18, 2015
    #21
    It depends on whether or not you like to spread the compound with a spreader or to just let the heat-sink do it. I like Arctic MX-4 compound. I've replaced the TIM on all my Macs and it works wonders. Use the guide at ifixit, print it out. Make sure you have all the tools and ideally, a plastic spluger to safely remove delicate connectors. I recently replaced it on a way too hot early 2011 Macbook Pro 15" i7-2820QM 2.3 Ghz. It lowered the temps by about 20 degrees C. The fans would rev up to about 6000 RPM and slowly back down not really doing anything. The best part is now the fan runs at about 2000 to 2500 RPM with moderate use and you can hardly hear it. Now I can have it on my lap and not get a 2nd degree burn. I've used the Gelid GC-Extreme, it's hard to spread, so if you do use it just let the heat-sink spread it.
     

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