MBP screen calibration with huey-pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by MBX, Mar 2, 2008.

  1. MBX macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    #1
    i just did a screen calibration with huey pro and i was curious if any other people experienced the same:

    - Apple's "Color LCD" Calibration does appear more yellowish but has a stronger contrast (which i like).

    - My new huey-pro callibration does have a better over-all color balance (less yellow) but has a bit less contrast.

    I'm happy with the new one so far. I'm just curious what other people think and why apple did a standard color calibration that does appear yellowish tinted? Couldn't they calibrate it all before shipping?
     
  2. rezonat0r macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    #2
    Yes, the default color profile is terrible and consistently yellowish on the six 17" MBP screens I have calibrated. Losing contrast is normal with any calibration.

    It would be far too expensive for Apple to calibrate each screen individually, but since most of their screens are starting to use LED backlights, which should be more consistent from unit to unit than CFLs, I would think they could improve their default profile.
     
  3. cobbe1 macrumors member

    cobbe1

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    #3
    I did. The Apple profile produces a yellowish strip about 3/4 inch at the bottom of the screen. After the HueyPro calibration the discoloration is barely noticeable, and it's only when trying to look for it at a certain angle.

    I like the Huey Pro profile much better than the default. :D
     
  4. tranceteria macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    #4
    So is the yellowish tint is a calibration issue rather than screen defect? Im very concerned about this; since Im a designer and also Im going to be first time MAC user when my new MBP arrives luckly next week.
    So how can I calibrate in order to yet rid of that yellow hue?
    Thank you for any help!
     
  5. dallas112678 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    #5
    The screen naturally has a yellow hue, what people describe as the "lower 1/3rd yellow problem" or something like that, is when the lower 1/3rd of the screen is slightly more yellow. Basically if you put up a white image on the screen and its not the same color white as the top of the screen but rather it seems like it has a tint of yellow, then that is the defect. If there is no difference between the top of the screen and the bottom, then the calibration will fix it because the screen is uniform if that makes sense.
     
  6. icec0ld macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    #6
    did you use your huey on a glossy or matte lcd? if glossy, do you mind posting the icc profile? thanks.
     
  7. rezonat0r macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    #7
    IMHO, the yellowing "issue" is really a viewing angle problem. Some LCD panels have more of a color shift than others, but I bet if you were to look at the bottom of the screen at a perpendicular angle, it would look pretty normal.

    The fact that Apple's default profile is so yellow is what exacerbates the problem. I wouldn't dream of ever using a display that hasn't been calibrated; the difference before and after is like night and day.
     
  8. dallas112678 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    #8
    Its not a viewing angle problem, i have one of these MBP's with this "issue" and when i look at the bottom perpendicularly you can still tell that there is a little yellow mixed with the white, its not as bad as the SR MBP's but you can still tell a slight difference and it is still annoying.
     
  9. MBX thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    #9
    not glossy, sorry.
     
  10. JWest macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
  11. rezonat0r macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    #11
    Don't get me wrong, on my 17" (non-LED) I have a red to green shift from top to bottom, so I feel ya. What I meant to say was that the problem is really exacerbated by off-angle viewing.
     

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