Microfiber cloths -- TERAGLOVE or MONSTER iCLEAN?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Amnesiac1, Jun 25, 2011.

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  1. Amnesiac1 macrumors 6502

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    #1
    I picked this up today:

    TeraGlove Microfiber Screen Cleaner
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The reason I picked it up is because of the bold bit in the quote above. Apple suggests that you use a lint free cloth and water. While I am sure the Monster spray is safe, it isn't exactly water and therefore the TeraGlove conforms better to Apple's own directions. Oh, and it's machine washable. Pretty great.

    HOWEVER -- the Monster iClean stuff comes with another cloth that supposedly gets rid of 99.99% of bacteria. I don't know if the Teraglove cloth offers this. I suspected that the bacteria fighting cloth in the Monster iClean stuff is a marketing gimmick and decided to get the TeraGlove.

    What do you think? Should I go and pick up that Monster iClean kit just for that ant-bacteria cloth?
     
  2. AbeFroman77 macrumors 6502

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    #2
    Don't use the search function and keep posting threads for every little thing that pops in your head.
     
  3. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3
    I used the search function and it yields only a handful of threads, none of which pertain to the specific query noted in the thread title.
     
  4. Steamrunner macrumors member

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    #4
    It's your money, if you're happy to just throw it around, go nuts. Why do you think you need an anti-bac cloth, though?
     
  5. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    To be honest, I'm not sure if I need one or not. When I first saw that the iClean kit comes with one, I suspected it was some spurious marketing ploy. Of course, I cannot confirm this having never used the product before. If that cloth can rid my screen of bacteria, whereas the Teraglove cannot, I suppose I might see a difference that would justify the purchase. Then again, the Teraglove could do everything that Monster's supposedly "anti-bacteria" cloth does...

    The only solution I'm seeing is to pick up the Monster cloth in addition to the Teraglove cloth, but that I also feel like that would be an unnecessary expenditure.
     
  6. Steamrunner macrumors member

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    #6
    Let me put it another way: buy the same antibacterial cloth you used to clean your previous computer screens. If you never used one, and yet you're still alive, it proves that you don't actually need one.

    But like I said, it's your money; you're clearly not short of a bob or two because a) you bought a specced-up iMac and b) you're considering not one, but TWO bits of overpriced cloth! Buy both of them, then you've got your bases covered. It's the only way you'll truly be happy (otherwise you'll always be thinking you should have got the other one).
     
  7. Amnesiac1, Jun 25, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011

    Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #7
    Question: if you just want to wipe up a couple of spots on the iMac that seem like little bits of condensation or water or something...very miniscule...is dampening the cloth necessary? I'm thinking applying the microfiber sans water directly onto these spots will do the trick as they are not fingerprints or smudges, but glistening little spots...

    I hope you guys understand what I'm referring to. I saw some of these glistening spots at the Apple store, too. Tiny, glistening spots... looks like tiny condensation on the outer layer of the screen, as if a tiny speckle of water got on it or something...

    Anyways, can I just directly apply a dry microfiber to spots like those?
     
  8. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #8
    To use it properly, the percentage of water used on the cloth should be equal to ⅔ the humidity or ¾ the dew point, whichever is less. If you don't follow this, you will get unpredictable results.
     
  9. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #9
    Only attempts at mean spirited put downs. huh? Great.
     
  10. Steamrunner macrumors member

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    #10
    What did you expect? Your question is basically "How do I use a cloth".
     
  11. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #11
    No, it wasn't -- it was a specific question ('is it okay to apply a dry cloth to the screen?'; see above for further details) that did not warrant these unnecessarily patronizing replies.
     
  12. Objector macrumors member

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    #12
    I think everyone is just saying you've opened so many threads the past days, that it seems you are overacting. Don't worry about your mac, it'll be a great machine! It doesn't matter whether you put the extra memory in before or after the initial boot, you won't damage it when you move it around your desk when it's on, you will probably be fine even without a surge protector, yes Crucial RAM is good,...


    You see what I mean? If you look at all the threads you've started, you'll realize that most of those questions could of been answered by either the search option or common sense. Stop worrying so much, because you'll make yourself go crazy of stress.

    On topic: just buy a cheap microfiber cloth and don't worry about it. The first couple of days you'll probably keep cleaning the screen, but you can't keep it smudge-free.

    And if you don't use an anti-bacteria cloth on your iMac, you risk the chance of getting it sick. You know those problems with the HD's where they make a clicking sound? Well... That ain't clicking. That's their iMac coughing and sneezing like hell.
     
  13. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #13
    Are you done ridiculing me now? Great contribution. Hope it gave you whatever satisfaction you were looking for.
     
  14. Big-TDI-Guy macrumors 68030

    Big-TDI-Guy

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    #14
    I have yet to see a Microfiber cloth do anything that "old-school" cotton cannot. If you feel safer this route - all the power to you.

    If you want to keep your display clean, without damage to the anti-reflective coating - don't clean it constantly. Everyone I know who was paranoid over damaging their AR coatings cleaned the hell out of them, whether it be LCD, Plasma, or Tube - now, all of them - their coatings are now peeling / rubbing off! The more you clean it, the more likely you are to scratch it up. It's a microscopic thin, soft layer on a hard substrate- the less touching, the better.

    I'd use compressed air if dust really irks you, or a static duster for the heavy stuff. I'd only wipe the screen down if you spilled something on it, like coke, or other spatter - as those can etch into your AR coating. Aside from that, only clean if you really need to.
     
  15. Steamrunner macrumors member

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    #15
    I read your question, and I hate to break it to you, but 'is it okay to apply a dry cloth to the screen?' actually does mean "How do I use a cloth?". It's questions like this, and "Can I move my iMac?" which are opening you up to ridicule.

    Do you ring up your dentist every time you get a new toothbrush? Do you spend a week asking your doctor's opinion of which burger is going to increase your cholesterol the least? Do you ring up Chevrolet to check which air freshener to use in your car?

    It's just a computer. It's nothing special; in a few years you'll have got rid of it and moved on to something else, so really, there's no point obsessing over exactly which cloth to use and whether to wipe with a circular motion or a side-to-side motion.
     
  16. Objector macrumors member

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    #16
    I wasn't ridiculing you, I was ridiculing the fact that an anti-bacterial cloth for a SCREEN exists... If one place on a desk needs an anti-bacterial cloth, then it's the keyboard, because that is filthy as *****.

    And I was just giving you the tip to try and don't worry so much. I also have the tendency to keep looking up information before I make a big purchase, but in the end you just give yourself sleepless nights for no valid reason.
     
  17. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #17
    Thanks!

    What would you recommend here? Dry cloth OK?

     
  18. Big-TDI-Guy macrumors 68030

    Big-TDI-Guy

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    #18
    While everyone on the internet is an expert - take this from someone who actually gets paid to clean (very expensive) coated optics for a living.

    Blow off heavy sediment first - any dust, even on the worlds best, safest, purest wipe - will act like sandpaper / polishing compound. Remove it with either compressed air, feather duster, static duster, or "California duster" use a light touch.

    After that, use a dampened wipe - as the moisture will act as a lubricant, in addition to helping captivate molecular contaminants. I do not know how hydrophobic the AR coating on an iMac is - and won't claim to. But - using distilled or deionized water is the safest bet, mixed with a little isopropanol will help cut any oils that may have condensed on the screen. That's just about exactly what you can buy from Lenscrafters for cleaning the coated eye wear - if it's safe enough for those, it's likely plenty safe for your glass screen.
     
  19. Amnesiac1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #19
    You just provided an elaborate and assured answer. Thank you.

    However, I should provide some context:

    I have had this iMac for all of one day. I don't think it is ready or needs an extensive cleaning.

    All I am 'concerned' about are these very tiny little condensation like spots on the screen. There are three in total. I imagine one light dab with my microfiber cloth will take care of them. I'm not wiping the whole screen down as, like I said, this iMac is brand new. However, I would like to simply remove these miniscule glimmering spots. Can I do this with just a dry microfiber cloth?
     
  20. Big-TDI-Guy macrumors 68030

    Big-TDI-Guy

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    #20
    Spots = residue that has dried. If you took a plastic sheet and dripped salt water on it, it will leave behind salt crystals after drying. If you tried to wipe that dry, you'd scratch the hell out of your panel.

    If you used water, it'd dissolve without a trace, and you'd be up and running.

    Cut and paste this with minerals, sugars, anything water soluble. Odds are good, a lightly dampened cloth with clean water - will set things straight with minimal effort.

    Edit: FYI - most photographers are far more worried about damaging lenses - so if you follow their methods, you'll be fine.

    A quick "Google" yielded this - I'm sure there are plenty - but this one sounds pretty sane... http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/tutorials/lens_filter_cleaning.html
     
  21. iAmYou macrumors 6502

    iAmYou

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  22. coolspot18 macrumors 65816

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    #22
  23. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

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    #23
    most dollar stores sell microfiber cloth for a buck
     
  24. Blue Sun macrumors 6502a

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    Australia
    #24
    I use this Tech Link spray and cloth.

    It is without a doubt the best cleaning solution for computers I've come across. It takes care of the aluminium exterior, keyboard and screen without any streaks.

    I highly recommend it.
     
  25. mrfoof82 macrumors 6502a

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    Lawton, OK
    #25
    iMac displays are glass.

    I use the exact same things I use to clean all the other glass in my home. Either glass cleaner, or vinegar & water. With a paper towel.

    I clean a goddamn Noguchi table with that, and so did my father, and my grandfather (who originally bought it in the 50s). Still doesn't have a scratch on it after decades of being cleaned that way (though back then they probably used terrycloth instead of paper towels).
     
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