Mid-2012 15" MBP: SATA II SSD Quesiton

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Reg88, Apr 27, 2016.

  1. Reg88 macrumors regular

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    Jun 8, 2010
    #1
    Hi,
    I've read that my MPB won't take full advantage of SSD b/c of the SATA II limitations.

    That being said, is there any advantage of getting the Samsung 850 PRO vs. the 850 EVO? It's my limited understanding that the PRO advantage is the reliability, and not so much the speed difference.

    Thank you!
     
  2. treekram macrumors 6502a

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    #2
    If you have a mid-2012 non-Retina MBP, it will run SATA3 on both ports, provided there are no cable issues (sometimes the cable will need to be replaced). Your assumption about the Evo vs. Pro is the correct one. I think the Pro has a 10-year warranty vs. 5 for the Evo.
     
  3. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #3
    The machine has SATA III and can take full advantage of all SATA SSDs.

    In addition to the increased durability and warranty of the 850 Pro over the EVO, the Pro also is able to sustain greater performance by a factor of up to 3 under extremely intensive workloads.
    For most people, the EVO is quite sufficient.
     
  4. MacInTO macrumors 6502a

    MacInTO

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    #4
    You probably read that about the 2011 models.

    I have a 2012 MBP with two SSDs and they both work at 6 gb/s.
     
  5. Reg88 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 8, 2010
    #5
    Awesome - thank you everyone!!
    Now the question is whether or not to pull out the optical drive and run an SSD-RAID stripe
    (just kidding)
    --- Post Merged, Apr 27, 2016 ---
    Actually I do have one more question -- do I need to do anything special re: TRIM? Or does El Capitan handle that for me.
    This would be my first SSD.
    Thanks!
     
  6. MacInTO macrumors 6502a

    MacInTO

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    #6
    Re Trim, in Terminal, use the command, "sudo trimforce enable" and then follow the directions. It's pretty simple.
     
  7. Reg88 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 8, 2010
    #7
    Thank you!
    1) Is running Trim necessary? I've read back and forth about yes and no, etc.

    2) I've also read here that you want Trim on before you clone the original HDD to the SSD (or risk heavy wear on the SSD early on). How do you turn on Trim before the SSD is even connected?

    Do I:
    a) connect the SSD via USB, etc.
    b) enable Trim in terminal
    b) clone the HDD to the SSD with CCC?

    Thank you again!!
     
  8. MacInTO macrumors 6502a

    MacInTO

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    #8
    I think trim is necessary. Here is an article about trim,

    http://www.buildcomputers.net/trim-support.html

    I try to enable trim as soon as possible after installing in my Mac. I'm not sure it's possible to do it before loading the OS, but you can run terminal after you format the drive. I've never run one from USB so I'm not sure about that. I also never clone drives. I load everything from scratch.
     
  9. Reg88 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 8, 2010
    #9
    Ok I'll check that out! Thanks.

    Also, can you point me to a reference to where I can simply put OS X on the SSD so I can boot in to OSX and then add all of my apps, etc.? Thank you!
     
  10. MacInTO macrumors 6502a

    MacInTO

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    #10
    If you have the SSD in an enclosure, you can download El Capitan or whatever OS and then load it onto the target drive. You can also load it onto a USB memory stick and load it from there if you have installed the new drive in your Mac.

    https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT201372
     
  11. Reg88 thread starter macrumors regular

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  12. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #12
    - It's better than not running it and it has no disadvantages.

    - TRIM doesn't function over USB, so you couldn't do exactly this.
     
  13. Mac 128 macrumors 601

    Mac 128

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    Apr 16, 2015
    #13
    So would it be best to install the Unformatted SSD, put the old HDD into an external enclosure and then boot up from the externaL?

    I'm still confused about enabling TRIM on an Unformatted internal SSD. Seems a shame to waste a write cycle to install OSX just to enable TRIM and then completely write over the drive.

    Does TRIM require a complete install of OSX on the drive in order to work? Or does it only need to be formatted?
     
  14. MacInTO macrumors 6502a

    MacInTO

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    #14
    When I get new drives, I install the unformatted one and then boot from a USB stick with the OS loaded and install from that.

    You can turn on TRIM at any time on an installed drive formatted and with the OS loaded.
     
  15. Mac 128 macrumors 601

    Mac 128

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    Apr 16, 2015
    #15
    Thanks. That's more or less how I would do it. I was just trying to get to the bottom of the recommendation to turn on TRIM before copying over your original files.

    So it sounds like the only way to do it, is to waste a write cycle installing MacOS, then copying over the original drive -- I use CCC.
     

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