Mid 2012 swap to SSD on El Capitan

Jaymin

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 13, 2015
8
2
I am doing my first upgrade to samsung SSD 850 pro. I need step to step guide on how to replace and install it back to working my MBP. also what are steps required to enable Trim.
Is there anything else i need to do other than enabling trim.
thank you
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,534
25,261
I am doing my first upgrade to samsung SSD 850 pro. I need step to step guide on how to replace and install it back to working my MBP. also what are steps required to enable Trim.
Is there anything else i need to do other than enabling trim.
thank you
Don't enable TRIM.

Easiest thing would be to backup existing HDD to Time Machine, fit replacement SSD, boot into Time Machine by holding Alt on startup. Format SSD through Disk Utility, restore Time Machine backup to formatted volume.
 

Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
30,461
10,268
California
OP> I agree with Keys suggestion on how to do the update, but I don't share his concerns about TRIM now that is is built into the OS.

After you get the new SSD up and running from the Time Machine restore, just boot to the SSD and in Terminal run the command below to turn on native TRIM support.

Code:
sudo trimforce enable
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
19,689
6,863
OP:

If by your original post you mean that you intend to swap out the HDD for the SSD, I would like to offer some advice.

My strongest suggestion:
"Prep and test" the new SSD -externally-, BEFORE you "do the drive swap".

This way, if you encounter any problems, you will still have a working computer with which to solve them.

You will need an external USB3 enclosure, but this will come in handy anyway for the old HDD.

I suggest when shopping for an enclosure, that you ONLY buy one that SPECIFICALLY STATES that it has "UASP support". This is needed to achieve the fastest speeds that USB3 can offer.

Numerous enclosures are available at places like amazon for $20+/-.

Put the SSD into the enclosure
Initialize with Disk Utility.

At this point, you have to decide whether you wish to do a "clean install" or if you'll be happy by just cloning the contents of the HDD to the SSD.

If you're going to clone, either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper can do the job.
I would suggest CCC because it also clones the recovery partition if you wish.

Once the OS is installed, do a test boot.
Restart and hold down the option key until the startup manager appears, then select the external SSD and hit return.

Do you get a good boot?
Does everything look as you want it to look?

If so, now is the time to power down and do the drive swap.
One important advisory:
Be sure you use THE RIGHT TOOLS for the job.

I think you'll need a Phillips #00 screwdriver and a TORX T-6 driver.
Available at hardware stores, Home Depot, Lowe's, online, etc.

Once you get the MacBook buttoned up, restart and again use the option key trick to invoke the startup manager. Select the SSD (now internal) and hit return.

Again -- do you get a good boot?
If so, be sure to go to the startup disk preference pane and designate the SSD to be your boot drive.

Also, as Weaselboy said above, you can use the terminal to turn on TRIM...
 

Jaymin

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 13, 2015
8
2
OP:

If by your original post you mean that you intend to swap out the HDD for the SSD, I would like to offer some advice.

My strongest suggestion:
"Prep and test" the new SSD -externally-, BEFORE you "do the drive swap".

This way, if you encounter any problems, you will still have a working computer with which to solve them.

You will need an external USB3 enclosure, but this will come in handy anyway for the old HDD.

I suggest when shopping for an enclosure, that you ONLY buy one that SPECIFICALLY STATES that it has "UASP support". This is needed to achieve the fastest speeds that USB3 can offer.

Numerous enclosures are available at places like amazon for $20+/-.

Put the SSD into the enclosure
Initialize with Disk Utility.

At this point, you have to decide whether you wish to do a "clean install" or if you'll be happy by just cloning the contents of the HDD to the SSD.

If you're going to clone, either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper can do the job.
I would suggest CCC because it also clones the recovery partition if you wish.

Once the OS is installed, do a test boot.
Restart and hold down the option key until the startup manager appears, then select the external SSD and hit return.

Do you get a good boot?
Does everything look as you want it to look?

If so, now is the time to power down and do the drive swap.
One important advisory:
Be sure you use THE RIGHT TOOLS for the job.

I think you'll need a Phillips #00 screwdriver and a TORX T-6 driver.
Available at hardware stores, Home Depot, Lowe's, online, etc.

Once you get the MacBook buttoned up, restart and again use the option key trick to invoke the startup manager. Select the SSD (now internal) and hit return.

Again -- do you get a good boot?
If so, be sure to go to the startup disk preference pane and designate the SSD to be your boot drive.

Also, as Weaselboy said above, you can use the terminal to turn on TRIM...

Thank you for this explanation I think it will help a lot.
 

Jaymin

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 13, 2015
8
2
OP> I agree with Keys suggestion on how to do the update, but I don't share his concerns about TRIM now that is is built into the OS.

After you get the new SSD up and running from the Time Machine restore, just boot to the SSD and in Terminal run the command below to turn on native TRIM support.

Code:
sudo trimforce enable

Thank you I will do it for sure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weaselboy

Jaymin

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 13, 2015
8
2
OP:

If by your original post you mean that you intend to swap out the HDD for the SSD, I would like to offer some advice.

My strongest suggestion:
"Prep and test" the new SSD -externally-, BEFORE you "do the drive swap".

This way, if you encounter any problems, you will still have a working computer with which to solve them.

You will need an external USB3 enclosure, but this will come in handy anyway for the old HDD.

I suggest when shopping for an enclosure, that you ONLY buy one that SPECIFICALLY STATES that it has "UASP support". This is needed to achieve the fastest speeds that USB3 can offer.

Numerous enclosures are available at places like amazon for $20+/-.

Put the SSD into the enclosure
Initialize with Disk Utility.

At this point, you have to decide whether you wish to do a "clean install" or if you'll be happy by just cloning the contents of the HDD to the SSD.

If you're going to clone, either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper can do the job.
I would suggest CCC because it also clones the recovery partition if you wish.

Once the OS is installed, do a test boot.
Restart and hold down the option key until the startup manager appears, then select the external SSD and hit return.

Do you get a good boot?
Does everything look as you want it to look?

If so, now is the time to power down and do the drive swap.
One important advisory:
Be sure you use THE RIGHT TOOLS for the job.

I think you'll need a Phillips #00 screwdriver and a TORX T-6 driver.
Available at hardware stores, Home Depot, Lowe's, online, etc.

Once you get the MacBook buttoned up, restart and again use the option key trick to invoke the startup manager. Select the SSD (now internal) and hit return.

Again -- do you get a good boot?
If so, be sure to go to the startup disk preference pane and designate the SSD to be your boot drive.

Also, as Weaselboy said above, you can use the terminal to turn on TRIM...

Also can you send me this detail procedure for fresh OS install and than just copy data from old hard drive
 
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