milk in Trackpad - 13" Macbook Pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by cavtma, Nov 8, 2009.

  1. cavtma macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    #1
    Help,
    I have a brand new 13" macbook pro at my office and before I admit to IT that I may have broken it, I'm turning to the forum. About 5 days ago, I got a droplet of milk right on the seam between the trackpad and the aluminum casing for my mac. I believe it seeped in a bit before I was able to wipe it clear. And ever since I have been able to use the track pad for EVERYTHING but clicking. It clicks, but nothing happens on the screen.

    Is this something that will just restore on its own or should I alert IT?

    Thank you
    :eek:
     
  2. HLdan macrumors 603

    HLdan

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    #2
    It's a work computer. Tell the I.T. department. Things happen.
     
  3. sam10685 macrumors 68000

    sam10685

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #3
    I just took got my computer (unibody macbook pro) back from the apple store and I had the exact same problem they said... My track pad wasn't clicking so they took it apart, found there was liquid, cleaned it and now it's fine. Is there anything I can buy to prevent water from getting between the track pad and unibody?
     
  4. striatedglutes macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    Yea seriously. OP, I don't know who you work for, but it's not like they're going to dock your pay, right?
     
  5. l.a.rossmann macrumors 65816

    l.a.rossmann

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #5
    Alert IT.

    It's their fault for supplying a vanity machine for work duty. They could have got a thinkpad, which you can pour a fishbowl into and still have it work fine. But they chose a machine that becomes a doorstep if liquid gets in the keyboard.

    I am not saying this to bash Apple products, I am doing it to point out this:

    YOU SHOULD NOT FEEL BAD FOR SPILLING MILK INTO A LAPTOP IN 2009.

    It happens. It's been over 20 years that this has been happening. Some companies engineer fixes. Others don't.

    Business environments demand fault resistant products and services. That's why they have SDSL, T1s and T3s instead of consumer DSL lines. And that's why they should have liquid resistant laptops instead of macbooks, especially when the fault resistant alternative COSTS LESS.
     
  6. sam10685 macrumors 68000

    sam10685

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #6
    Yes-- Apple engineers have chosen not to remedy the problem for whatever reason. Is there a product available to purchase that can deter that problem though? Like a silicon or rubber guard similar to what many brands sell for keyboards.
     

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